Jump to content
dilby

Deciding if I should move back to Aus with children

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone - I’m an Aussie expat who’s lived in the UK since graduating in 2006, and I was hoping some kind folks could indulge me while I share a bit of my story and hopefully get some anecdotal insight that might be helpful.

I first moved for a role straight out of uni, and got married very young, and the intention was to stay in the UK for a few years, start a family and move back. However things weren’t that easy, and we ended up in a blur of surgeries and IVF treatment, which has lasted 12 years (it wasn’t something we could just walk away from for various practical reasons). 

Now thankfully we have a little baby girl, and I’m now wondering what our future looks like. I had always imagined going back and living our our lives in Aus, but the longer we have stayed here, the more we have made it home. We have a decent house here on the coast (Gower), a good network of friends and I have a business that pays me well (if it helps to talk numbers I’m on about £75k annually here before tax). But we now have the question of what is best for our little girl who is now 6 months.

Here we are near my wife’s family, but they have been surprisingly unhelpful. We are largely independent people but we really have started to notice the need for outside help. And beyond that we want our daughter to have a relationship with them which is so far lacking. Conversely, when my Aus family facetime my daughter lights up, and they regularly call.

So we just got back from a trip to Australia, which we treated a  little like a recce mission, thinking our daughter would have better family connections if we went and overall a better upbringing. However we realised that no family is perfect and found we had issues there too (although they were much more intentional with her), and didn’t feel any tug on the heart strings.

The truth is, nowhere feels like home to me now. What doesn’t help is my family are based between Canberra and another rural nsw town, neither places I particularly love. So if we chose another place to live in Aus it feels a silly move to go all that way to still be hours from my family.
My wife is also very happy here and thinks such a move would be silly too.

So I’m trying to make sense of it all really. I’d be curious what other’s processes were like when deciding if a country was best for their children, as this needs to be my driving factor. As she’s only 6 months now is that something I need to discover in time by observing, and what are people’s thoughts about a cut off for when is too old to move a child?

And has anyone moved to aus to be not-so-close to family and have anything to share on that?

And any other input is hugely appreciated. (FYI we still have more IVF to do so the move wouldn't be for 3-4 years yet but I'd need to start getting wheels in motion sooner rather than later.)

I realise this has been a huge ramble so thanks anyone who has made it this far. I really do love Aus but am so torn and want to do what’s right for my girl; I wish to put roots down soon as I’m sick of living in limbo.
 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dilby,

I can relate to much of your circumstances and am happy to share our experience if that might be of help to you.

Me (a Brit), Wife (Aussie) here in the UK since 2002.  Live 45 mins away from my family who were never equipped to be any help.  Wife comes from large and very close family.  Was tough for her to be away from them, especially once the kids came along from 2004.  That actually was a turning point for her.  Kids are a great way to make connections with people going through the same experience as you.  At kiddie club, at the playground, then at school.  Actually our closest friends were from the ante-natal parent classes.   We were able to build a bit of a support network from that friendship group and that was really great.   

I think it might have been harder if she had to work during the the pre-school period but we were fortunate that she didn't and they could work school hours only afterwards.  That made a big difference too.   It's a lot of pressure being a working parent with a kid in nursery when you get called one a fortnight because the kid is sick.

Wife's mum is a wonderful lady and has always visited us annually for a 9-10 weeks over the summer.  Of all her grandchildren (too many to count on both hands), she is closest to mine.  They built such a bond when she was here 24x7 for weeks at a time.  It's still there today.  the 18 year old calls her every Sunday to chat (nothing to do with us, he just does it on his own).  The other grandchildren visiting for a few hours on the weekend (even every weekend) is nothing near the same impact.

Over the years we've faced the question "Stay or Go" a number of times.  We've agonised over the fork in the road and played out the positives and negatives of moving at different stages of our lives.   I would tell you from that experience that you have plenty of time to make that decision.  Really, any time up until secondary school that move is going to be easy for your daughter to adapt.  After that, then you are locked in place for a few years.

They are both great countries to live in.  As you know better than me, they are just different.  Different pro's and different con's.

We are heading back to Sydney in 2026 when the youngest finishes A-levels.   The biggest concern in our minds is if, after waiting all these years for the right time, will we like it once we get there?  We are used to life in a town now and Sydney 2026 has changed a lot from Sydney 2022 when we last lived there.  You might face this same dilemma.

"living in limbo" is no fun.  It can be draining on your mental health.  If an unqualified stranger can offer an opinion on that......make a plan.   If (for example) you decide "we're heading back before she starts high school", then you are no longer in limbo.   You're here until 2034 and then you are emigrating.  It will remove that feeling of unease that comes from indecision.    Your plan can always be changed as circumstances change.

  • Like 4

British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

5 Feb 2023 - 309/100 submitted | 14 Mar 2023 309 & 100 granted

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As always happy wife happy life.

If your wife is happy and doesn't want to leave her family then in likelihood you aren't going anywhere. And you probably need to come to terms with that.

  • Haha 1

Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm inclined to agree with Parley.  Too many stories on this site about the other half not keen on making the move and ending up being miserable and very unhappy here.  You have a house a decent job and friends where you are so you do sound like you have put roots down.

Who knows though  ...................  maybe your wife will be happier to move in a 3-4 years.

Good luck

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds something like my son who left Aus in 2002 "for a year" - he wont be coming home.  Like you he's on a good whack, has a nice house, growing son and whereas once he thought he would like his kids to have the same childhood he had, he has chosen to continue with the career he loves and it is unlikely he will ever come back - hasnt been back since 2010 and though he thought he might like to come back for Christmas his job will be changing so that wont be possible.   His wife is unlikely to want to leave TBH although at the start of their relationship she was all for it and couldnt wait (yeah right, she never was! anything outside the M25 is too far away for her)

If what you have is working then dont try and fix it - the area you are living in is beautiful and it sounds like you have it better than most tbh.  Nothing much here worth coming over for and my impression of Canberra education gets worse by the day, unfortunately so I wouldnt say that it offered much of a better future for a child - different probably but not better from my observations.  Contrary to what you think might be better - ie living near your rellies I would suggest quite the opposite.  We lived 12 hour drive from my husband's folk and 24 hour flight away from mine - that worked out well.  I think if I were closer to his family the resentment that he had it all and I had none of mine would have set in and where we were, we were a family unit doing it together.  I see you are close to your in-laws - is it that you resent them having it all (even if they arent making good use of it) and your folk missing out? 

I know what it is to have the goal posts changed on you though - I never imagined the rest of my life in Canberra and if you had told me that back at the start I would have been on the next plane home and there is a certain resentment that I am stuck here so I hope that doesnt happen to you.  We just went with the flow until we, unfortunately, went past the point of no return. So if you really feel duped and that your goalposts have been changed then either you need to address that and make changes or, like me, you work out your least worst position and live with it.  As far as your time frame goes - could be any time really.  Your kids will be citizens by descent so they may decide to move once you have retired, that would still be OK.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ultimately it sounds like the OP has a decent life and has a lot of ties to the UK (his partner more than him but still many ties)

If one of you isn't up for the move it will always be an issue, I guess it depends on are you unhappy in the UK ?

@Marisawright often comments that in reality the UK and AUS are both first world countries with pros and cons, AUS is not the land of opportunity it was in the 1960s for affluent UK people anymore.

It's a tough decision, however given you have kids and your partner sounds like she might be a Brit I'd be tempted to get over to AUS while the kids are young and wait out the time for your other half to get her citizenship in AUS, that way you get to trial living in AUS and if you do decide to return to the UK, you will all have AUS citizenship and UK citizenship to be able to move at will....

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My best advice is don’t come on to this forum looking for life advice. 
There are a lot of negative noras on here who feel trapped in Australia and don’t realise how grim the UK is becoming.  A lot of the main contributors are of a certain age, moved decades ago and don’t have much (if any) recent experience of the moving process. They will mostly tell you to stay put. (Sorry guys but this is the impression you give I’m afraid, you know who you are!). 
Only you know if this might be a good move for you. Perhaps it might be an idea to seek out families at a similar age and stage who have recently moved? You yourself can’t seem to find any particular benefit to making the move, so why are you considering it? Although you say there is no particular pull to Aus, the fact you are on here in the first place suggests there is a niggle somewhere. Maybe you need to put your finger on exactly what that niggle is? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cheery Thistle said:

My best advice is don’t come on to this forum looking for life advice. 
There are a lot of negative noras on here who feel trapped in Australia and don’t realise how grim the UK is becoming.  A lot of the main contributors are of a certain age, moved decades ago and don’t have much (if any) recent experience of the moving process. They will mostly tell you to stay put. (Sorry guys but this is the impression you give I’m afraid, you know who you are!). 
Only you know if this might be a good move for you. Perhaps it might be an idea to seek out families at a similar age and stage who have recently moved? You yourself can’t seem to find any particular benefit to making the move, so why are you considering it? Although you say there is no particular pull to Aus, the fact you are on here in the first place suggests there is a niggle somewhere. Maybe you need to put your finger on exactly what that niggle is? 

Having read your response and the shade you cast on some members, I think it's safe to say your user name is 50% dead on accurate and 50% a work of fiction.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think one of the great things about this forum is the fact that so many posters have stuck around for so many years, offering advice and opinions based not only on their own life experience but on information shared by and with other posters. And when it comes to the emotional aspect of migration all sorts of thoughts and feelings are explored and shared in Aussie and UK Chat threads. People can read, skip, ponder or ignore that stuff, but in reality those of us that have been part of the forum for a long time know that while some doubts are probably just a wobble, other worries could be key issues the poster would be well advised to weigh and consider carefully.

Migration is not an an exact science, as demonstrated by the fact that while life is truthfully very grim for many in the UK just now, other people such as the OP live in a nice place, with a decent income and a network of good friends. Gambling all of that to move from one first world country to another is a big decision and one that is hopefully helped by the shared thoughts and experiences of others. Particularly those who have been there/ done it. Tx

 

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ausvisitor said:

Having read your response and the shade you cast on some members, I think it's safe to say your user name is 50% dead on accurate and 50% a work of fiction.

Having been on the receiving end of borderline (no, scratch that, outright) abusive comments on this forum from some long standing members (several comments made by others removed by moderators due to their nature) my comments are justified. 

I’m suggesting that the OP look beyond this forum to those at a similar age/stage as them who may have made the move recently. It’s important to get a balanced view and i’m not sure you get that here. It’s not all rainbows and unicorns but it’s not all doom and gloom either. That’s life. You’re also entitled to your opinion about me based on one post in a forum, I’m not sure that’s wise or balanced either but that’s up to you. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, tea4too said:

I think one of the great things about this forum is the fact that so many posters have stuck around for so many years, offering advice and opinions based not only on their own life experience but on information shared by and with other posters. And when it comes to the emotional aspect of migration all sorts of thoughts and feelings are explored and shared in Aussie and UK Chat threads. People can read, skip, ponder or ignore that stuff, but in reality those of us that have been part of the forum for a long time know that while some doubts are probably just a wobble, other worries could be key issues the poster would be well advised to weigh and consider carefully.

Migration is not an an exact science, as demonstrated by the fact that while life is truthfully very grim for many in the UK just now, other people such as the OP live in a nice place, with a decent income and a network of good friends. Gambling all of that to move from one first world country to another is a big decision and one that is hopefully helped by the shared thoughts and experiences of others. Particularly those who have been there/ done it. Tx

 

 

I think some people will likely have been scared away by some of the doom-mongers on here. I stopped posting a while back due to this and lo and behold come back on and it hasn’t changed! I have found other communities to help me on the journey. Can people who are retired with grown families, who emigrated 30 years ago really relate to those doing so now and provide up to date information? Maybe the feelings are the same, but the circumstances are much different. 
 

Living in a ‘nice place’ on a good salary with friends doesn’t necessarily mean you can completely insulate yourself from the rest of society unfortunately. I too have those things but the way the UK is going frightens me. Most of my friends who are ‘happy’ live in this bubble where if it doesn’t affect them they don’t really care, until they have a horrendous experience with healthcare or their kid’s school and realise what’s actually happening.  Never mind trying to get to a dentist or (god forbid) trying to get your bin emptied regularly or access a sports centre. And don’t get me started on the state of our city centres. Unless you live in an affluent pocket, the UK really is on a self-inflicted downward spiral. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Cheery Thistle said:

I think some people will likely have been scared away by some of the doom-mongers on here. I stopped posting a while back due to this and lo and behold come back on and it hasn’t changed! I have found other communities to help me on the journey. Can people who are retired with grown families, who emigrated 30 years ago really relate to those doing so now and provide up to date information? Maybe the feelings are the same, but the circumstances are much different. 
 

Living in a ‘nice place’ on a good salary with friends doesn’t necessarily mean you can completely insulate yourself from the rest of society unfortunately. I too have those things but the way the UK is going frightens me. Most of my friends who are ‘happy’ live in this bubble where if it doesn’t affect them they don’t really care, until they have a horrendous experience with healthcare or their kid’s school and realise what’s actually happening.  Never mind trying to get to a dentist or (god forbid) trying to get your bin emptied regularly or access a sports centre. And don’t get me started on the state of our city centres. Unless you live in an affluent pocket, the UK really is on a self-inflicted downward spiral. 

I'm confused - with respect you sound like the biggest doom monger on here. Appreciate the help but can you please sit this one out? Thanks

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/05/2023 at 11:28, Cheery Thistle said:

I think some people will likely have been scared away by some of the doom-mongers on here. I stopped posting a while back due to this and lo and behold come back on and it hasn’t changed! I have found other communities to help me on the journey. Can people who are retired with grown families, who emigrated 30 years ago really relate to those doing so now and provide up to date information? Maybe the feelings are the same, but the circumstances are much different. 
 

Living in a ‘nice place’ on a good salary with friends doesn’t necessarily mean you can completely insulate yourself from the rest of society unfortunately. I too have those things but the way the UK is going frightens me. Most of my friends who are ‘happy’ live in this bubble where if it doesn’t affect them they don’t really care, until they have a horrendous experience with healthcare or their kid’s school and realise what’s actually happening.  Never mind trying to get to a dentist or (god forbid) trying to get your bin emptied regularly or access a sports centre. And don’t get me started on the state of our city centres. Unless you live in an affluent pocket, the UK really is on a self-inflicted downward spiral. 

I don't see that people's viewpoints are any less valid because they haven't just made the move themselves. Its still possible to keep up to date with visa issues, and the viewpoint of a long term resident with regards to housing, shopping, schools, work etc is just as valid as someone only n the country for a year. If anything, longer experience of Australia can be valuable as you haven't got the rose-tinted approach that many have in their fist few months. 

Had to smile at your list of reasons why the UK is doomed! Horrendous experience with healthcare? I lost all faith in Australian healthcare after my GP and my boss started discussing my health issues behind my back. And some of the experiences friends had in hospitals in Brisbane were just degrading. Schools? No kids myself, bit have a friend whose child was at a primary school locked down three times in a month due to knife crime. Dentist? Don't make me laugh, who can afford one of those?  Bins? Just before I left Brisbane the residents of my narrow street had our bins unemptied for a month because the bin lorry refused to enter the street saying he "didn't believe it was a real road" and the council did nothing. My only brush with sports centres was trying to get access to a swimming pool - no chance, all booked out for "length training" or schools!

Neither country wins, they are just two western nations with very similar issues 🙂 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Nemesis said:

I don't see that people's viewpoints are any less valid because they haven't just made the move themselves. Its still possible to keep up to date with visa issues, and the viewpoint of a long term resident with regards to housing, shopping, schools, work etc is just as valid as someone only n the country for a year. If anything, longer experience of Australia can be valuable as you haven't got the rose-tinted approach that many have in their fist few months. 

Had to smile at your list of reasons why the UK is doomed! Horrendous experience with healthcare? I lost all faith in Australian healthcare after my GP and my boss started discussing my health issues behind my back. And some of the experiences friends had in hospitals in Brisbane were just degrading. Schools? No kids myself, bit have a friend whose child was at a primary school locked down three times in a month due to knife crime. Dentist? Don't make me laugh, who can afford one of those?  Bins? Just before I left Brisbane the residents of my narrow street had our bins unemptied for a month because the bin lorry refused to enter the street saying he "didn't believe it was a real road" and the council did nothing. My only brush with sports centres was trying to get access to a swimming pool - no chance, all booked out for "length training" or schools!

Neither country wins, they are just two western nations with very similar issues 🙂 

A lot of people here don’t keep up to date with the visa situation though and give out dangerous mis-information as if it is fact. If I has listened to some people on here I would have thought I stood no chance of getting a visa - luckily I had the sense and resources to engage a migration agent. 

Perhaps a valid point about those having been there for years and having experienced things over time. The issue with that is that it’s often been a long time since they have experienced the UK (or elsewhere) and the rose tint can also operate in reverse!
 

I think what irks me (if I am allowed to say that without everyone getting offended) is a load of people who made a massive life change 30 years ago telling others they couldn’t/shouldn’t/can’t do exactly what they did. 
 

Anyway, I have no desire to monopolise the thread for the OP who seems genuinely to be experiencing a bit of an identity crisis which is probably not uncommon in migrants. Wish them all the best with the fertility struggles too which can’t have been easy. 
 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Cheery Thistle said:

A lot of people here don’t keep up to date with the visa situation though and give out dangerous mis-information as if it is fact. If I has listened to some people on here I would have thought I stood no chance of getting a visa - luckily I had the sense and resources to engage a migration agent. 

Perhaps a valid point about those having been there for years and having experienced things over time. The issue with that is that it’s often been a long time since they have experienced the UK (or elsewhere) and the rose tint can also operate in reverse!
 

I think what irks me (if I am allowed to say that without everyone getting offended) is a load of people who made a massive life change 30 years ago telling others they couldn’t/shouldn’t/can’t do exactly what they did. 
 

Anyway, I have no desire to monopolise the thread for the OP who seems genuinely to be experiencing a bit of an identity crisis which is probably not uncommon in migrants. Wish them all the best with the fertility struggles too which can’t have been easy. 
 

 

I do tend to agree with you Cherry Thistle about negative and incorrect advice given to prospective immigrants who post on PIO, even though I am one of the oldies who does post,  I never give immigration advice. . I think if anyone who seeks advice from a public forum, should realise that most replies will come from other posters, who however well intentioned are not M Agents So the advice might not be correct, but I also know how much help and support I have had and been grateful for over the years of my and my children’s immigration journey. 

The problem that occurs is that sometimes, potential immigrants take offence at the replies or at the tone of the reply to their questions, respond accordingly, and that doesn’t help anyone.

Long term members of PIO who stay around to help new posters, including me, do it to genuinely try to help. If we had all left, or never replied, there would be no point in PIO continuing, as not many new members who have been helped bother these days to stay around to help.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/05/2023 at 18:28, Cheery Thistle said:

I think some people will likely have been scared away by some of the doom-mongers on here. I stopped posting a while back due to this and lo and behold come back on and it hasn’t changed! I have found other communities to help me on the journey. Can people who are retired with grown families, who emigrated 30 years ago really relate to those doing so now and provide up to date information? Maybe the feelings are the same, but the circumstances are much different. 
 

Living in a ‘nice place’ on a good salary with friends doesn’t necessarily mean you can completely insulate yourself from the rest of society unfortunately. I too have those things but the way the UK is going frightens me. Most of my friends who are ‘happy’ live in this bubble where if it doesn’t affect them they don’t really care, until they have a horrendous experience with healthcare or their kid’s school and realise what’s actually happening.  Never mind trying to get to a dentist or (god forbid) trying to get your bin emptied regularly or access a sports centre. And don’t get me started on the state of our city centres. Unless you live in an affluent pocket, the UK really is on a self-inflicted downward spiral. 

The way Australia is going frightens me. Of course without the benefit of duration of time, the decline may pass somewhat unchecked. Instead of placing scorn on longer term participants, surely they are better placed to take in the changing environment and able to illuminate the situation as stands.

Obviously there is a whole industry out there selling Australia sometimes as some Lotus Land or at best as a vast improvement on UK. It can be for some. I know some that gloat over how well they are doing (especially to relatives remaining in UK) but not always forthcoming in just how that is so. But moving on. We in WA at least, have similar problems to UK , just not yet arrived at their levels of decline (thanks a lot to more than a dozen years of austerity) But then, as here many people are doing very well.  But to further the reasons why things are not so different in the real world is that the hospital system is stretched here as well. WE have the luxury of attracting a lot of UK/Irish nurses though (better pay) so would hate to think how bad it would be otherwise. Still the nurses display disquiet at conditions in recent protests. Teaching? Recent figures showed a teacher is in some form assaulted every forty minutes in a WA school setting. (must admit a result that surprised me) Police? resigning it record numbers and seems unable to stem the flow. Doctors? Close to impossible to find one not charging. Dentists? Expensive .Work? Recent figures show Australians are working some of the longest hours in the world, ( high work stress levels) carry second highest personal debt in the world , (a lot due to having some of the most inflated housing in the world) a pretty much broken rental system,  the highest level of recreational drug use in the world, but besides those few things , the sun shines, the beaches remain attractive and every thing else is hunky dory. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Blue Flu said:

The way Australia is going frightens me. Of course without the benefit of duration of time, the decline may pass somewhat unchecked. Instead of placing scorn on longer term participants, surely they are better placed to take in the changing environment and able to illuminate the situation as stands.

Obviously there is a whole industry out there selling Australia sometimes as some Lotus Land or at best as a vast improvement on UK. It can be for some. I know some that gloat over how well they are doing (especially to relatives remaining in UK) but not always forthcoming in just how that is so. But moving on. We in WA at least, have similar problems to UK , just not yet arrived at their levels of decline (thanks a lot to more than a dozen years of austerity) But then, as here many people are doing very well.  But to further the reasons why things are not so different in the real world is that the hospital system is stretched here as well. WE have the luxury of attracting a lot of UK/Irish nurses though (better pay) so would hate to think how bad it would be otherwise. Still the nurses display disquiet at conditions in recent protests. Teaching? Recent figures showed a teacher is in some form assaulted every forty minutes in a WA school setting. (must admit a result that surprised me) Police? resigning it record numbers and seems unable to stem the flow. Doctors? Close to impossible to find one not charging. Dentists? Expensive .Work? Recent figures show Australians are working some of the longest hours in the world, ( high work stress levels) carry second highest personal debt in the world , (a lot due to having some of the most inflated housing in the world) a pretty much broken rental system,  the highest level of recreational drug use in the world, but besides those few things , the sun shines, the beaches remain attractive and every thing else is hunky dory. 

 

 

Not like that here.  Must be a WA thing…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Cheery Thistle said:

A lot of people here don’t keep up to date with the visa situation though and give out dangerous mis-information as if it is fact. If I has listened to some people on here I would have thought I stood no chance of getting a visa - luckily I had the sense and resources to engage a migration agent. 

Perhaps a valid point about those having been there for years and having experienced things over time. The issue with that is that it’s often been a long time since they have experienced the UK (or elsewhere) and the rose tint can also operate in reverse!
 

I think what irks me (if I am allowed to say that without everyone getting offended) is a load of people who made a massive life change 30 years ago telling others they couldn’t/shouldn’t/can’t do exactly what they did. 
 

Anyway, I have no desire to monopolise the thread for the OP who seems genuinely to be experiencing a bit of an identity crisis which is probably not uncommon in migrants. Wish them all the best with the fertility struggles too which can’t have been easy. 
 

 

It should be obvious that participants on this forum would not be the ones to consult on the visa situation surely? That is an ever changing scenario of rules and regulations that change with the tides. Increasing one would need 'industry' advise to navigate the process as to keep abreast of changes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Blue Flu said:

The way Australia is going frightens me. Of course without the benefit of duration of time, the decline may pass somewhat unchecked. Instead of placing scorn on longer term participants, surely they are better placed to take in the changing environment and able to illuminate the situation as stands.

Obviously there is a whole industry out there selling Australia sometimes as some Lotus Land or at best as a vast improvement on UK. It can be for some. I know some that gloat over how well they are doing (especially to relatives remaining in UK) but not always forthcoming in just how that is so. But moving on. We in WA at least, have similar problems to UK , just not yet arrived at their levels of decline (thanks a lot to more than a dozen years of austerity) But then, as here many people are doing very well.  But to further the reasons why things are not so different in the real world is that the hospital system is stretched here as well. WE have the luxury of attracting a lot of UK/Irish nurses though (better pay) so would hate to think how bad it would be otherwise. Still the nurses display disquiet at conditions in recent protests. Teaching? Recent figures showed a teacher is in some form assaulted every forty minutes in a WA school setting. (must admit a result that surprised me) Police? resigning it record numbers and seems unable to stem the flow. Doctors? Close to impossible to find one not charging. Dentists? Expensive .Work? Recent figures show Australians are working some of the longest hours in the world, ( high work stress levels) carry second highest personal debt in the world , (a lot due to having some of the most inflated housing in the world) a pretty much broken rental system,  the highest level of recreational drug use in the world, but besides those few things , the sun shines, the beaches remain attractive and every thing else is hunky dory. 

 

 

Load of rubbish. The hospital system is absolutely NOTHING like as stretched here as in UK.  Appointment times are much shorter, beds are much more readily available and ED wait times dramatically lower. Schooling options are better, class sizes appear smaller and yah de yah...

You're quite a contributor to unhappiness you know Blue Flu. I'm not sure you actually help anyone with these comments despite your assertions that you "give the other side".

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm always amazed how people resent paying for things like doctors and dentists. I think this is a very English thing to expect to waltz through life not paying for services from hard working professionals.

I have no problem paying for expert advice or service from people who have studied for many years to get their experience and qualifications.

  • Like 1

Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, DrDougster said:

Load of rubbish. The hospital system is absolutely NOTHING like as stretched here as in UK.  Appointment times are much shorter, beds are much more readily available and ED wait times dramatically lower. Schooling options are better, class sizes appear smaller and yah de yah...

You're quite a contributor to unhappiness you know Blue Flu. I'm not sure you actually help anyone with these comments despite your assertions that you "give the other side".

Well if you were/are a doctor, one may assume you would be wise to the situation. I never claimed it was as stretched as UK , just on a similar path. It is hard to match twelve years of Tory austerity. Even then it would depend on where exactly in the UK one lives as to the treatment.

Now I refer to WA. Actually it was The Health Minister Cook who stated in 2022, (while addressing nurses)  " We know that staff are struggling. WE know morale is low. We know that the system is under pressure"

500 Code Yellows over 2021-22. (Ramping crisis. Well discussed over the media surprised you missed it)  Actually one of our main hospitals, Sir Charles Gardiner, went into Code Yellow 144 times alone.

Maternity Hospital King Edward Memorial had 30 code Yellows.

7000 hours paramedics made to wait to transfer their patents to care of hospitals. That was just for the month of July 2022.There was reported inadequate funding over the five years that the present government was in power. 

2,463 ambulance ramping's just in first 11 days of August 2022.

Man power shortages included..

100 Midwives

350 Junior Doctors. 

A senior clinician at that time, predicted "carnage" at WA hospitals . They said "The system is broken and compromised because people are broken at burned out".

Emergency Dept consultants raised their voices as well and told the doctors union that the situation was "dire". 

It would be wrong of me to leave out the death of baby Aishwarya. This highlighted staff shortages and resulted in nearly 1,000 nurses and doctors highlighting the problems that had been raised for years by means of protest. (a result of a 2 hour wait to be seen for medical attention) 

That did provoke a degree of tension between government, hospital administration, staff and union. 

No. Perhaps not yet as bad , as the worst case examples in UK, but bad enough for a wealthy state, with a small population but unable to cope. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, DrDougster said:

Load of rubbish. The hospital system is absolutely NOTHING like as stretched here as in UK.  Appointment times are much shorter, beds are much more readily available and ED wait times dramatically lower. Schooling options are better, class sizes appear smaller and yah de yah...

You're quite a contributor to unhappiness you know Blue Flu. I'm not sure you actually help anyone with these comments despite your assertions that you "give the other side".

As for schooling, that is a highly debated subject, but one that UK appears to come out better in, judging by comments of those that returned. As mentioned an assault of some description on a WA teacher every forty minutes. (according to recently released stats)  I would imagine I don't fulfill the role as a' salesperson' of/to Australia, but do turn the page over on the selling and advertising of the business of immigration (for that it what it is) and don't expect it will make any difference to anyone whose mind is set, nor really care to, (your choice) but do like to put a side other than the glossy selling. Well observed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Bulya said:

Not like that here.  Must be a WA thing…

Well okay..... Another Sandgroper first we'll call it then. Our expertise will no doubt reach out across the miles help you deprived eastern staters out then.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Blue Flu said:

Well okay..... Another Sandgroper first we'll call it then. Our expertise will no doubt reach out across the miles help you deprived eastern staters out then.  

No thanks, we’re doing just fine 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×