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Marisawright

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Marisawright last won the day on November 30

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About Marisawright

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  1. Marisawright

    Taxes On A House In The UK When Living In Oz

    @Wanderer Returns, all fair points, except for one thing. The OP is coming to Australia on a temporary visa. So if they buy in Australia, they'll have to apply to FIRB for special permission to purchase (which incurs a fee of a few thousand dollars). Then they will pay a "foreign investor" surcharge on the purchase price (aorund $40,000 on a $500,000 property). Not to forget the normal stamp duty, mortgage and conveyancing costs - another $20,000+. All up, they'll be paying $60,000 to $70,000 on top of the purchase price, and then of course there's the cost of selling their UK property. Then of course, in the first few years of a mortgage, it's mostly interest that's paid off and very little principal. The final issue is that if it's a regional visa, they'll be outside the capital cities, and capital growth on houses there is much slower. Taking all that into account, if they fail to get a permanent visa and have to sell up and go home at the end of four years, there's a very good chance they'll make a loss on the investment, even allowing for the rent they would have paid in Australia. And in the meantime, who knows what the UK property market will have done.
  2. Marisawright

    Taxes On A House In The UK When Living In Oz

    Oops I had forgotten about being on a temp visa. Just goes to show how easy it is to get wrong and why you need a professional
  3. Marisawright

    Taking CAR from Oz to UK

    Bottom line, if there's something unique and special about the car, or you're emotionally attached to it, you may feel it's worth shipping it. If it's just that you feel you'll lose too much value selling it now, don't bother. The cost of shipping, compliance, expensive insurance and maintenance in the UK and then difficulty selling it in the UK because it's unusual, are all likely to add up to far more than any loss you'll make selling it before you go.
  4. Marisawright

    New Passport

    The ATO and HMRC do talk to each other about some things, but not that. I'm worried someone hacked into your computer or your phone and tried to access your personal records. It seems too much of a coincidence that you had trouble with both of them in the same timeframe. Make sure all your antivirus software is up to date and that it's scanning the computer regularly. Do a full scan and change your passwords too.
  5. Marisawright

    Cost of moving to Oz

    It varies according to the state you live in and the Award you're under. In all the jobs I worked in (in NSW in corporate jobs), you had to work 10 years to get paid out your accumulated LSL. The only way you'd get it earlier was if you got retrenched.
  6. Marisawright

    New Passport

    It's strange that it's happening after you've been using the site for so long. I wonder if someone tried to hack into your account and tried the password once too often?
  7. Marisawright

    Taxes On A House In The UK When Living In Oz

    I think your husband is being very sensible. Although you may be able to apply for permanent residency after a certain number of years, it's only a possibility, not a certainty. There are so many things that can go wrong in the meantime, including the chance that they'll change the rules and suddenly, you'll find you're not eligible. You will have to submit a tax return in both the UK and Australia but that doesn't mean you pay tax twice. You'll pay whatever tax is due on your British income to the British taxman. Then when you submit your tax return in Australia, you'll show your British income and also the British tax you've already paid. The Australian taxman will work out how much they would normally charge, compare it to what you've already paid in UK tax, and you'll only be asked to pay the difference (if any). It's fiddly, and it would be worth using a tax agent to sort it all out for you, because they'll make sure you claim all your deductions and pay the minimum tax. You need someone who's experienced in both British and Australian tax because they need to know how they dovetail. @Alan Collett can help. Of course, there's a fee, but you can claim that as an expense on your Australian tax, too.
  8. Marisawright

    Cost of moving to Oz

    I doubt it would be legal to work longer than 12 hours in one shift.
  9. Marisawright

    New Passport

    You need to clear your cookies on your computer, or use a different computer, then you’ll be able to go back to the beginning
  10. Marisawright

    Cost of moving to Oz

    I never got close to earning long service leave in over 30 years working in Oz. I don’t know many people who do get it. Sticking in one job long enough is rare in corporate life
  11. Marisawright

    Where would you live in Tasmania?

    People who make a big deal about humidity are the people who can't cope with it. You sound like it doesn't bother you as much, and I'm glad for you, but please don't diss people who aren't like you. When I'm in a humid area, I puff up like a balloon. My fingers turn into sausages. I feel physically ill. And that's just sitting still, I couldn't contemplate exercise. My face sweats - which is embarrassing. I well remember attending a business meeting at a café in Sydney on a 30 degree, humid day, and being mortified as the sweat dripped off my nose. After a humid day, I can't cool down, even if I go into air-conditioning - the only solution is a swim or a cold bath (a shower doesn't bring my core temperature down so it's no solution). I think my reaction is worse than most, but I'm not unique by any means and there are plenty of people who find humidity unpleasant. Whereas I'm wondering what on earth you mean by "unpleasant dryness" as I can't say I've ever experienced such a thing. I remember being in Adelaide on a 40 degree day and it was great. In what way does it feel unpleasant for you?
  12. Marisawright

    Where would you live in Tasmania?

    Moving all the way down to Tassie seems like a bit of a drastic move, as it's going to the other extreme. Is it the humidity or the heat that really gets to her? I'm fine with heat but I can't cope with humidity, so I can't handle Queensland either - but I would be fine in Adelaide, for instance, because it's a drier heat.
  13. You need to arrive before that date. Once you are in Australia, you can relax, because you don't need the RRV to be allowed to stay in the country. You'll only need it when you want to leave the country again. Once you've got a place to live (i.e. sign a six month lease or buy a home) and found a job, you can then apply for a RRV, citing your home and your job as "strong ties" to Australia.
  14. Marisawright

    Weird visa Question - 2005 Visa

    The Assurance of Support money is not used for anything. It's a safeguard, in case they end up a burden on the state. After 10 years, the whole amount is repaid to the person who lodged it. To be honest, it sounds as though someone conned your grandparents. There is no visa where you pay money upfront and it is then used to pay for health costs. Such a visa never existed.
  15. Marisawright

    189 Visa on 85 point

    That is true - in fact it's more like 95 points, and right now, they're hardly inviting anyone. The good news is that as a nurse, you are in a priority occupation. I suggest booking a consultation with Paul to work out your best strategy. You might be better off finding a hospital to sponsor you, but Paul will know.
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