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Marisawright

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Everything posted by Marisawright

  1. Marisawright

    Parent visa

    True, but the income test for the Commonwealth Seniors Card is fairly lenient, it doesn't take assets into account. And as @ramot points out, even if you don't qualify for the Seniors Card, you can apply for the Safety Net. It's true there is a wait after you've got your visa but that is only 4 years which compares to forever on the 804.
  2. Marisawright

    Parent visa

    The fees for a 804 are obviously much much lower. You have to look at the extra costs involved in living as a foreigner in a foreign country for the rest of your life. For instance, if you want to buy a home on the 804, you'll be up for fees of around $45k, because you'll be classed as a " foreign investor". Then there's extra health costs, for instance the difference between paying $30 or $40 per presciption item on reciprocal Medicare, or $6 per item if you're on the 143. In old age where you may be taking blood pressure pills, cholesterol pills etc etc, that can mount up very fast.
  3. Marisawright

    PBS

    Good point, that's another thing she certainly needs to know if that's the case.
  4. Marisawright

    PBS

    Considering the username is "Nanna" and a simple check of her posts shows she's looking at a parent visa...
  5. Marisawright

    PBS

    However as I noted, there is a difference in how much you pay, depending whether you have a health card or concession card of some kind. If you have one of those cards, you'll pay $5.80 per item. If you don't have a card, you pay the standard PBS prices. Although they are heavily subsidised, you will still be paying up to $40 per item.
  6. Marisawright

    Any teachers moving over?!

    Yes my ex was obliged to go to a country school so he had to teach history (which he failed at school!) as well as life skills and I forget what else, as well as science. However what you do to get a job once here is not the same thing.
  7. Marisawright

    Any teachers moving over?!

    Are you a teacher? I am not a teacher but I come from a family of teachers and my ex-husband is a teacher. They will all tell you that they chose their specialist subject(s) because they like or even love that subject. Because they love the subject, they love teaching it to others. They've spent years studying it so they can do that to the best of their ability For them, there is nothing so soul-destroying as being shoved into a classroom to teach subjects they know little or nothing about. And of course, they will then have to spend hours of unpaid overtime reading up on said subject so they can teach it intelligently. Sure, they know how to control a class, but that's not why they wanted to be a teacher. And it shows a lack of respect for the many years they spent studying their specialist subject, as well as a lack of respect for the subject they're being asked to teach.
  8. Marisawright

    PBS

    It depends what you mean by "discounted". If you have a medicare card and have PR, you pay the normal PBS price, regardless of your age, which can be up to $40 per item. If you qualify for a Seniors Health Card or a Pensioners Concession Card, then you get cheaper prescriptions (currently $6.80 per item). https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/commonwealth-seniors-health-card
  9. Oatley is lovely, it even has a village green and a clock tower. Watch out for the train line when viewing houses as there are coal trains that travel at night along Sydney rail lines. Of course the train line also means you're in town in 40 minutes! Gymea is another nice suburb with a train station. If you don't mind being farther from a train station, there are lots of nice areas around that part of the world. Visit the Como Pleasure Grounds while you're there and don't miss the Como Hotel. Many outer suburbs of Sydney are soulless with no high street and no atmosphere, so it can be a slog trying to find the ones that have some character.
  10. No, Australian landlords hate long leases.
  11. Marisawright

    Still here and still feel the pull

    This is a very good question. The son is clearly anxious not to have to disrupt his nice life for them, instead it's up to them to disrupt theirs.
  12. Marisawright

    Parent visa

    Well, if you want to buy a house while on the 804 bridging visa, it'll cost you an extra $50k in surcharges and fees. I'd say the other $40K will be eaten up eventually because you'll never be eligible for cheap medications, aged care, or the Australian aged pension. And on the 804 bridging visa, there's always a risk you could be deported if your medical bills start costing the government too much. Remember with the 804 you'll never get the visa, you'll be on a temporary bridging visa for the rest of your life.
  13. Marisawright

    Still here and still feel the pull

    It's never a good idea to ask lawyers about tax matters, as I know to my cost. You need a tax agent who is knowledgeable about the tax in both countries, because as you said, the two are related. You will fill out a British tax return and pay tax as a non-resident, then you will declare the British tax on your Australian return and the Tax Office will work out the balance due, if any. Once a tax agent has done the returns for you the first time, you may well be able to do them yourself thereafter, but it's worth paying to get it done first time through as it gets fiddly. The Seniors Health Card is income tested but not capital tested. And you'll need the Seniors Health Card to get the concession prices on prescriptions. Until you get that, you will pay the same as working people for your medicines which can be up to $30 or $40 per item on the PBS. A note about the Australian pension. If you hold a RRV, you are eligible for the Australian pension, provided you meet the residency requirements. That means you must have been resident in Australia for at least 10 years total. 5 of those years must be continuous. So even if you don't meet the residency requirements now, you will at some point in the future. How much pension you get will depend on how much money you have, because it's means-tested. Again, you may have too much money now, but the pension will be there as a safety net as your savings dwindle over future years. That may make you feel better about your financial security in the long term.
  14. Marisawright

    Still here and still feel the pull

    It's just terminology. The difference between concession with a small 'c' and a Concession Card with capital letters. We also have the Seniors Health Card and it gives us access to concessionary pricing. However as you (correctly) said in your post, there are other concession cards including a Pensioners Concession Card.
  15. Marisawright

    Still here and still feel the pull

    It's not different info, it's just how people refer to the cards. They all give you a concessionary price but the name of the card is different. The proper name for the card we have is the Commonwealth Senior Health Card. That qualifies us for the $6.80 price.
  16. Marisawright

    Still here and still feel the pull

    If you have a permanent visa (i.e. your RRV) then you get some concessions, it has nothing to do with the pension. We don't get the pension yet but we get the concession, which means each item costs $6.80. You also don't need the pension to get concessions on public transport.
  17. @EmilyVio, in the interests of "managing expectations", I read the article which Ausvisitor linked to. I had to laugh when I read the statement that "$1000 a week is a healthy budget". It's not. The couple ended up paying $1300 a week for a house in Lindfield and that's what I would expect. In fact, I woudln't have found that figure surprising even when I lived in Sydney 6 years ago. The thing is, Sydney is like London in that only young people, DINKS (double income no kids) and couples with a new baby live in the inner suburbs. As soon as the children get older, most families move to the middle and outer suburbs to find an affordable home. New arrivals feel that, especially coming from London, they should be able to afford to live closer to work, but it's not true and anyway, it's not necessarily a good idea. After all, wouldn't you rather live where other families live? If you want to stay close to the coast, which most new arrivals do, then don't overlook the south (my favourite place in the south is Oatley, which feels almost like a village--however if your children are primary school age you might struggle to get something there, as competition to get into the school is fierce).
  18. Marisawright

    Resident return visa

    All that matters is that it's a firm job offer, as far as I know
  19. Not really, as the great majority of "open for inspections" are on Saturday. Occasionally they'll open on a weekday evening, but if they're getting plenty of interest on the Saturday, they won't bother. Most agents won't agree to give you a private inspection, either. So it's a case of organising your Saturday like a military operation to sprint from one Open to the next. That's why it takes so long to find something, because how many properties can you see on just one day a week? The big advantage of a staggered move is that it takes the pressure off. If it takes two months to find a home, you're only paying for a studio or 1-bedroom AirBnB rather than a family-sized one. The idea of using a renter's agent is well-established in Sydney. I would use a specialist agency rather than a real estate agent. https://sydneyrentalsearch.com/
  20. In Sydney, the standard lease is 6 months or 12 months.
  21. Marisawright

    Parent visa

    If it's only another 4 years then it seems silly to put yourself through all the pain and risk of being a temporary resident forever. Being on the bridging visa is restrictive and expensive so you'll be much cheaper and have more freedom if you just have long visits for the next couple of years then get the 870 to tide you over.
  22. Marisawright

    Did you move back to the UK & regret it?

    Get the application in straight away and fingers crossed!
  23. Marisawright

    Furniture

    Did anyone say that?
  24. Marisawright

    Did you move back to the UK & regret it?

    They won't process your citizenship application while overseas and the whole process from application to ceremony was taking up to a year in some places, even with Covid, so I'm not sure that getting citizenship will be an option. How long have you been away? Will you be risking your PR if you don't return?
  25. Marisawright

    Parent visa

    Why not apply for the 870 and leave the 143 live? How much time till the 143 comes through?
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