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Marisawright

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Everything posted by Marisawright

  1. Marisawright

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    Watch out, we’re getting off topic again
  2. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    That may be the case. Pub culture, as it exists in the UK, isn't a thing in most of Australia. Some suburbs in Sydney have no pub at all - all the socialising is done in cafés which is not the same thing. Don't get me wrong, there are pubs in Oz, but the vibe is different. I do think that's one key reason why many Brits can't settle. If the pub was how you met/made friends and the centre of your community, you're not likely to settle in Australia unless you're willing to make a major shift in your habits and lifestyle.
  3. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    You could say the same about London or Cambridge, for instance. It doesnt make those cities bad places. You're the one who chose the second most expensive city in the whole of Australia (and yes I know you had a good reason). You could move literally anywhere else, except Sydney, and afford a better suburb.
  4. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    Exactly. I'd say the same about Sydney, and you'd only have to ask @bug family about the dreaded boondocks of Perth. Like I said, big cities always have their fair share of dodgy suburbs. @Dan Not Dale, how does your partner feel about going back to Blighty? I think that's the biggest question, because it's got to be a joint decision. And I understand about finacial concerns, but you need to think about the long-term future, not just now. Below is a cautionary tale. It's a typical story we've seen from several members who came to Australia for a "better lifestyle", didn't really settle, but stayed because they were financially better off: Kids come along, and life gets too busy to think about going home. Eventually the pull gets stronger - maybe parents getting older - but you can't move now, because the kids are in Year 10 so you can't disrupt their education. Then they leave school, but you discover they'll be treated as a foreigner by British universities so will have to pay full fees, no grants or loans. Can't afford that, so you're stuck till they finish uni. But by that time, your kids are 100% Aussie so they won't leave - and your wife won't leave them, especially once they marry and there are grandkids in prospect. Maybe you'll leave when the grandkids are teenagers and don't have as much time for grandpa and grandma? So you think, worst case scenario, I'll retire back home. But then you discover that means losing a third of your superannuation to the British taxman, you can't claim the Australian pension, and you're not entitled to much of a British one either. So you're stuck till you die. (I should just repeat that I feel far more Australian now than British so I can't fully empathise with people in that situation, but I have seen similar stories too many times on these forums - to ignore them would be playing Pollyanna).
  5. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    I think that has a lot more to do with a reluctance to disturb their lives than with a reluctance to travel, though.
  6. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    I do think the Australians' willingness to travel is a myth. I think it was true many years ago, and outback Aussies still travel long distances because they have to - but in my experience, modern urban Aussies are far more reluctant than Brits to travel far. When I first arrived in Australia, I lived in Warracknabeal and worked near Horsham. That meant a 200K round trip every day, but it was a fast run on a long, straight, empty road, and there were no jobs locally. Everyone at my work (all Aussies) were gobsmacked that I would drive that far to get to work. I lived in Sydney for over 30 years. When I lived in the Eastern suburbs and Inner West, friends would come to visit. We moved to Oatley, were there for five years, and never once did any of those friends come to a BBQ or dinner party. We had to go to them. "Too far" apparently. By contrast, when we were in Southampton, I was stunned to find that people happily travelled to Portsmouth or Bournemouth for their weekly dance classes - and in winter that meant in the dark and probably pouring rain, not to mention horrible traffic.
  7. Marisawright

    I know no one will care but...........

    Yes, very very important. Most people have no idea what a true ergonomic setup really is. If you've got wrist rests and you're using them, your setup is not ergonomic! In a true ergonomic setup, your upper arms should be hanging loosely by your sides while you are using your keyboard and mouse.
  8. Marisawright

    I know no one will care but...........

    I hope you let the physiotherapist know what happened, even if you send him an email. He certainly should not have pushed you through pain - sounds like he's either a bit of a shonk or inexperienced. If it was inexperience then you giving him feedback may prevent him damaging somebody else.
  9. Marisawright

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    you’re the one who quoted what he said. Read it again. He’s talking about the end of the year, and the course of 2021 and A vaccine,, not two. Consistent with what they’ve been saying recently. You may get two jabs before end year but I bet many don’t
  10. Marisawright

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    Sounds like smoke and mirrors to me. "During the course of 2021" could still mean most of the supplies won't arrive till after October. And you note it's only A vaccine for everyone, when we all know we need two jabs. So nothing much has changed if you ask me. We might have a decent number of people half-vaccinated by the end of the year. Whoopee-do.
  11. Marisawright

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    But not enough, we are still just getting the supplies from our original order and that's why they're having to go slow with the Pfizer. We aren't going to get a large delivery until October, remember?
  12. Marisawright

    Australian now has the world's most liveable cities

    We are in autumn in Melbourne right now. Had a lovely sunny walk this morning. Spring in Melbourne is my oh's favourite time (he's had melanoma so he doesnt like high UV).
  13. Marisawright

    I know no one will care but...........

    @ramot, I would also suggest seeing a good physiotherapist, or a myotherapist or reflexologist if you're feeling adventurous. One of the things I learned during my dancing career is that GP's and even some specialists aren't very good with tendon/ligament/muscle problems. Their response tends to be that if surgery won't help, then rest is the only other option. Whereas a good physical therapist can do an enormous amount if you're willing to give them a try.
  14. Marisawright

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    Yes, but we can't get any more supply till October. I'm sure many other countries are in the same position. The longer we delay the start of vaccinations, the longer it takes to get everyone vaccinated. You're basically saying, let's just put everything on hold for 5 months. You say there are "a number of" clot cases. How many out of how many vaccines? How many deaths as a percentage?
  15. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    If Basingstoke feels around the right size, then I would take that as a guide. Maybe think about what other cities you like in the UK, and check what their populations are, too. In my experience, the size of population isn't a bad guide to what place is likely to be like in either country (certainly not perfect, but it's a place to start!). Ballarat and Bendigo are a bit small at 110,000 people but they are tipped to grow fast due to the exodus from Melbourne, so that sounds like they could have potential. Both have lots of history and historical buildings too. Other than that, there isn't a lot of choice of similar-sized cities in Australia. You've got Hobart, Townsville, Cairns. I would definitely recommend Adelaide, but also look at Newcastle. It's bigger than Basingstoke (nearly 500,000 people) but much smaller than any of the capitals. Like Basingstoke, it's within a couple of hours'driving distance of a major city (London for Basingstoke, Sydney for Newcastle). Housing much cheaper than Melbourne, good beaches, on the doorstep of the wine region. Whichever you put on your shortlist, I'd say it's absolutely essential to visit. Not just for a day or even a weekend, but for a couple of weeks to do a proper job. (as for Perth - if you find amazingly cheap suburbs, remember your Melbourne experience. Perth has some lovely areas but it has a huge swathe of soulless suburbs too, like any city that size - and that's where housing is cheapest!)
  16. Marisawright

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    I don't think @HappyHeart is suggesting the vaccine caused the problem? None of the vaccines are effective immediately, her friend was just unlucky to catch Covid before the vaccine took effect.
  17. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    Now you're being inconsistent, because Perth is a hell of a long way from Melbourne, and you said you needed to stay close to one family. Air fares Melbourne to Perth are high enough to be a serious disincentive to frequent family visits so I can't see why you'd consider it, no matter how nice a city it is. If you're willing to consider Perth, I'd go for Adelaide instead. I'm sure @Lavers can give you some pointers. Adelaide to Melbourne is driveable (by Aussie standards) and only a short flight for family visits.
  18. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    A very long time ago. Warrnambool is only 35,000 people compared to Bendigo's 110,000 people. What size was the town you came from in England? S It's far too easy to sit in Melbourne and think, 'Oh, there's no point moving somewhere else because they'll be just as bad". Doing that, you're just making massive assumptions and that's no basis for making decisions. You're within driving distance of all these places so do your research. I'm wondering if either: deep down, you really long to go home, so you don't WANT to find place you could be happy in Australia - you'd be surprised how often that's the case; you've got depression, which makes it difficult to get up and do something about your issue - so a counsellor might help; you're a lazy bugger. I'm actually wondering if it's the first one that really applies but your partner isn't keen to leave their family?
  19. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    What about the rest of Victoria?
  20. Marisawright

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    Also remember Trump was advocating it as a preventative, whereas this study refers to using it as a treatment for the critically ill.
  21. Marisawright

    Renting property on a temporary visa

    That's what I thought too - if a visa is applied for offshore, you can't come to Australia on another visa, and then get a bridging visa to stay. If it was that easy, legions of parent visa applicants would be doing it. That said, their immigration lawyer seems confident. I'm thinking that with Covid, all kinds of rules are being relaxed for people onshore so maybe that will swing it.
  22. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    Yes, I'm not suggesting they move to the country and commute to Melbourne. I was suggesting, work permitting, that they look at a smaller city to live AND work in. The OP then replied that they'd want to stay close to Melbourne to be close to family, hence the suggestion of Geelong, Bendigo or Ballarat. The area between Melbourne and Geelong is getting very built up but it was founded as a separate city and still has its own identity and its own city centre. To me, that's the difference between a satellite city like Geelong and a suburb: a suburb still looks to the main city centre for many of its amenities, whereas a satellite city has its own identity and its own amenities in its own city centre. To be honest, I always saw Geelong as a dirty, working-class town and have been very surprised by the number of people who have moved there (mainly young families) and are loving it. They like the fact that unlike Melbourne, you can live in suburbs which have both the beach and suburb within easy reach.
  23. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    Have you ever visited? That would be the first step if not. Book some weekends away.
  24. Marisawright

    Ping Pongers

    That's what I was trying to say. It's impossible to have large cities like Sydney, Melbourne, Vienna, Manchester, Paris, Madrid, you name it, without having soulless suburbs. They're inevitable. Anything over about a million people and you'll start to see them (yes, Perth has them too!). Most migrants to Australlia arrive in those large cities and due to lack of funds, they often end up in the soulless burbs. It can give a very distorted view of Australia.
  25. Marisawright

    Tax on UK lump sum pension

    Good idea. I think the question to research is, how is an overseas pension treated by the Australian taxman? How much tax would you pay on it? As you probably know, when you declare the lump sum on your Australian tax return, you'll also declare the British tax paid. The British tax will be deducted from whatever Australian tax is due on the amount. So if the Australian tax due would be more than the British tax, I don't think there's much point going through the hassle of reclaiming. However, if the Australian tax would be LESS than the British tax was, you don't get a refund of the excess British tax, so it might be worth the hassle depending how much it is.
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