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FirstWorldProblems

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FirstWorldProblems last won the day on July 14

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About FirstWorldProblems

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  1. FirstWorldProblems

    Sewage sleuths and English Welsh rivers

    According to the search feature, you did. You made 107 posts about immigration/immigrant/migrant
  2. FirstWorldProblems

    Cost of Living.

    I disagree. I don't think it's a money grabbing opportunity. It's a diversion - they want the average man and woman to look "down" the earnings ladder, not "up" at the removal of the bankers bonus cap and high earners tax breaks. Let's look at the numbers. 120,000 people who currently work part time for between 12 hours and 15 hours a week will now find themselves affected by the earnings threshold change. 120,000 people will therefore have to work UP TO 3 hours move a week, earning UP TO an extra £27.50. So a maximum of £3.3m additional earnings. Since they earn below the tax free threshold they won't be taxpayers, so there's no more money coming into the public purse, but there is up to that £3.3m not going out..... .....which is such an infintessimally small number when you compare it to: the billions the UK gov refuses to go after in windfall tax opportunities, the £1.7bn cost of tax avoidance p.a. the £4.6b of tax evasion p.a. the £16bn lost to covid loan fraud the £4b spent on unuseable PPE the £9.24bn lost revene from the removal of the national insurance rise (28m ppl X £330 a year avg according to government) It's just the usual tactic of creating an enemy to divert attention. And it works. Many people will jump to the same conclusion as Tulip did because it's a carefully worded policy change intended to do exactly that.
  3. FirstWorldProblems

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    here it is The number of people admitted to hospital who test positive for covid is rising once more in every English region after two months of decline. The seven-day total for admissions increased 17 per cent from 3,434 on 12 September to 4,015 a week later. This appears to signal the fourth wave of increased covid admissions the NHS has faced this year. The steepest rise came – as has been the case at the start of previous 2022 waves – in the South West. The seven-day total jumped 39 per cent to 509. The largest increase by number of patients came in the North East and Yorkshire region, where the total rose 174 (30 per cent) to 755. The total number of covid positive patients in English hospitals is also rising again in every region, except London. The South West – a relatively small health and care economy with limited ability to improve discharge rates – saw occupancy balloon 63 per cent in a week. As has been the case since spring, around a third of covid positive patients are being treated primarily for the disease. The x-axis of the chart isn't easy to read - it starts at 1 April 2022 and runs to 18 Sep in 2 day increments
  4. FirstWorldProblems

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    It’s behind a paywall but the Health Service Journal published charts they say evidences a 4th wave building. It’s going to be a very very tough winter for an NHS that is demoralised, already has a huge backlog and has 1 in 10 roles vacant that they can’t fill.
  5. FirstWorldProblems

    Cost of Living.

    On this one you would assume wrong. It targets those in universal credit who work part time. Typically because of limitations of their health or family circumstances such as childcare. The purpose of the move is to try and fix the workforce crisis in the U.K. caused by immigrant workers leaving the country and early retirements during/following the pandemic. All this will do is make the tough lives of 120,000 people in poverty even tougher. I wonder when they will turn to the ageing population and force 65-75 year olds back to work - after all they are costing much more than they paid into the state pension pot.
  6. FirstWorldProblems

    Cost of Living.

    That's a very good question. You'd think there were 3 or 4 prominent senior female members of the Labour leadership who have high levels of appeal with voters.
  7. FirstWorldProblems

    How is Megan doing so far?

    Nor did they. They didn’t hold hands until the procession was over and they were exiting the church. It’s very clear on the video that is easy to find online for any people who prefer to fact check It’s just the usual awful media feeding those who prefer to hate and vilify than to be right.
  8. FirstWorldProblems

    Post a random picture of your day

    They look like androids who ran out of power
  9. FirstWorldProblems

    Post a random picture of your day

    What a striking looking pair
  10. FirstWorldProblems

    How is Megan doing so far?

    As an aside, I was buying a new bike a couple months ago and they came into the shop with their daughter. They don't have security but I certainly noticed that he is very alert and it was my perception that he was constantly looking out for potential threats.
  11. FirstWorldProblems

    Sewage sleuths and English Welsh rivers

    No its nothing to do with immigrants. It's everything to do with profits. We were told we had to privitise the utilities because they were underperforming and only the private sector could fix them. The private sector would invest in the infrastructure needed to create a sustainable business that would serve us forever. They'll weed out the terribly inefficient and top heavy management. It won't cost us taxpayers a penny. Oh and you'd have choice. We won't just sell these businesses to one company, they'll be broken up and if you don't like the service you are getting from one, you can switch to another. Free market economics and competition will drive higher performance AND keep the cost down. What happened? Cost for consumers went UP. The investment never came. The ability to swap providers was absolutely true for Gas and Electricity, but not so for water as they are regionally based. We have a system here where waste water and rainwater are mixed and treated together. The public sector has not in fact invested in an infrastructure. Since 1989 when it was privatised shareholders have been paid £72bn in dividends (a lot of which came from taking on debt - £56bn worth). Prices have grown 40% in real terms (so not just normal inflation). But yes, I suppose we could blame "too many people" if we want to. As for investment in the infrastructure........ we currently are facing water restrictions across the country one fifth of water is lost to leaks because we are STILL using a Victorian system water companies are unable to process the volume of waste water they are receiving (during one of the driest summers on record no less) and are dumping huge amounts into the sea. The other week 100 English beaches were closed due to water companies releasing excess. Figures released in March by the Environment Agency showed that water companies discharged untreated sewage into English waterways for more than 2.7 million hours in 2021, in over 370,000 separate incidents It'll be the NHS next. Once the government and their client media have been successful in convincing enough of us that the NHS struggles are because of inefficient management rather than a lack of investement in training doctors and nurses, they'll push to privitise healthcare. Who knows, we might become world beating and overtake the USA in % GDP spent on healthcare. Imagine spending 17% of GDP and yet not having free-at-the-point-of-care healthcare. UK currently spends 10%
  12. FirstWorldProblems

    Sewage sleuths and English Welsh rivers

    I don’t think you are allowed to post Brexit benefits here. Definitely don’t mention the removal of banker bonus limits whilst simultaneously giving nurses a real terms pay cut.
  13. FirstWorldProblems

    How is Megan doing so far?

    Oh come on now. None of us has a clue why they held hands. Let’s not jump to the worst possible motivation. Personally my wife and I hold hand whenever we are walking together and we’ve been married over 20 years. I do it because she says so.
  14. FirstWorldProblems

    How is Megan doing so far?

    That is powerful. You'd think we'd all be far more concerned with wars, the cost of living crisis, the brexit calamity and the climate issues that affect us all, than we are with Meghan Markle and Trans people........it's almost as though the powers that be are aware that if you give people someone to hate, you'll distract them from the real problems.
  15. You've lived in Australia before so you have a good understanding of the day to day cost of living. I suppose childcare is potentially a new one for you? My sister in law pays $170 a day in Sydney and it really grates on her to see almost half her salary go straight out the door on that, but they don't have a choice, they need both incomes. You'll also have a good sense for what kind of lifestyle you want. It's not for everyone, but I have another in-law who has lived out in Camden for many years and they love it there. Property is more affordable and it's populous enough that they only really leave the area to visit family. When the new Western Sydney airport opens in a few years it's going to bring more jobs and easier national and international travel. Personally I prefer it there. The rolling hills and green fields are more to my taste than the endless urban sprawl of Sydney's inner suburbs. But if weekends at the beach is what you have in mind......well it's a bit of a trek and heading up the coast might be a better choice. When you make your decision, consider what is probable regarding your future income. Are one/both of you aggressively climbing the career ladder in fields where you salary could be double what it is now in 5-10 years time? If so, then struggling for a few years could be worth it to put down roots where you really want to be. If not then I'd echo the other's and urge caution about Sydney. Time goes by quickly and before you know it you're 40, havent' been able to save a deposit and property prices have risen faster than salary putting it further out of reach. Good luck! Hope it all works out great for your family.
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