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Aussiebird

We have finally arrived in Perth

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I think it’s quality of life more generally.  Not busy like the UK, lots of sunshine, beaches, good for families and more recently the direct flight to London helps tips the balance.

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2 hours ago, Canada2Australia said:

What is the appeal about Perth to Poms? My understanding is that there is a huge cohort of English in Perth, but I can't understand why the area is such a magnet for them specifically. Is it the assumed perception that the weather is 'perfect' in Perth, above all else? Can anyone explain this?

Just curious.

The climate being more Mediterranean than other states attracted us, that and it being one of the least populated states.

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I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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9 hours ago, ali said:

Great news - where will you be based

 

Thanks Ali, I will be based in the Peel region. 

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31 minutes ago, Aussiebird said:

Thanks Ali, I will be based in the Peel region. 

Its nice down that way!  My Aunt lives just south of Mandurah.  There wasn't much there when I first visited in 1986, amazing how much there is there now!

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PR (100) Plans on hold but moving to Perth eventually!

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It’s fantastic to hear your over there, our flights hit canceled yesterday for Sydney on the 1st November. We have booked a long flight to Vancouver then Sydney, very quite going that way so I hope it won’t get canceled or bumped of. Ringing lots of airlines clearly there isn’t many airlines bothering with Oz just thought Qantas would be helping get people home but I was wrong. I’m dreading the quarantine but be happy to get to Sydney. We have a three year old so two weeks in a room feels like hell to me but it’s short pain for long gain so we will get on with it. Any tips on what to take and the process of what to expect please let us know. Such as will they do washing for you or can they go to shops so you can buy stuff to clean with? We plan to air b&b for a month so I think we will leave booking that until we are in quarantine just in case the flights canceled again. The stress about getting there and what to expect is exceptional and I just want to start settling down. Good luck and I loved Perth so much but we are state sponsored so Sydney will be our future for the first 2 years.

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2 minutes ago, Dorsetbrit said:

It’s fantastic to hear your over there, our flights hit canceled yesterday for Sydney on the 1st November. We have booked a long flight to Vancouver then Sydney, very quite going that way so I hope it won’t get canceled or bumped of. Ringing lots of airlines clearly there isn’t many airlines bothering with Oz just thought Qantas would be helping get people home but I was wrong. I’m dreading the quarantine but be happy to get to Sydney. We have a three year old so two weeks in a room feels like hell to me but it’s short pain for long gain so we will get on with it. Any tips on what to take and the process of what to expect please let us know. Such as will they do washing for you or can they go to shops so you can buy stuff to clean with? We plan to air b&b for a month so I think we will leave booking that until we are in quarantine just in case the flights canceled again. The stress about getting there and what to expect is exceptional and I just want to start settling down. Good luck and I loved Perth so much but we are state sponsored so Sydney will be our future for the first 2 years.

We are the same, but as the government has relaxed its rule on needing to enter wthin 12 months of grant we are playing it by ear and looking to make the move once quarantine ends, luckily I've got one of those jobs that you can do from anywhere and so I can be totally flexible about when I leave (also as it is my company the boss is very understanding about not having a diffinitive end date 😉 )

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We are the same, but as the government has relaxed its rule on needing to enter wthin 12 months of grant we are playing it by ear and looking to make the move once quarantine ends, luckily I've got one of those jobs that you can do from anywhere and so I can be totally flexible about when I leave (also as it is my company the boss is very understanding about not having a diffinitive end date [emoji6] )

We had already set the ball rolling before they relaxed it, notice handed in for my wife as she had a 3 month notice period and I stopped all my advertising and began to look for jobs, my wife has a job now that she’s due to start mid November so fingers crossed all goes well and I can’t see quarantine ending until well in to next year. I also feel the quicker we leave the uk the better but that’s another debate I’m sure.
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9 hours ago, Ausvisitor said:

We are the same, but as the government has relaxed its rule on needing to enter wthin 12 months of grant we are playing it by ear and looking to make the move once quarantine ends, luckily I've got one of those jobs that you can do from anywhere and so I can be totally flexible about when I leave (also as it is my company the boss is very understanding about not having a diffinitive end date 😉 )

I agree with Dorsetbrit.  Australia will not relax the quarantine requirements until infection rates in other countries are down to the same level as Australia.  Look around the world and ask yourself how soon that is likely to be!   They've said repeatedly that restrictions will stay in place till July next year, and possibly longer (though they're hinting at allowing more arrivals from January).  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 19/09/2020 at 13:26, Aussiebird said:

We will  thank you!!👌👌👌

Have you thought about renting for a while? If you know the area you are moving to fair enough but we rented for a year which gave us chance for a good look round. We knew the suburb we wanted to be in quick quickly but a bit of advice we got from the guy who found the house for us was invaluable. He knew that the quite looking single lane Marmion Ave was going to be a busy dual carriageway in a few years, and it is. We could have bought a house close to it and regretted it later.

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On 25/09/2020 at 09:42, Canada2Australia said:

What is the appeal about Perth to Poms? My understanding is that there is a huge cohort of English in Perth, but I can't understand why the area is such a magnet for them specifically. Is it the assumed perception that the weather is 'perfect' in Perth, above all else? Can anyone explain this?

Just curious.

You got the weather thing right. I think we were typical poms before we emigrated. Lived near Stockport, about as far away from the Coast as you can be, then the nearest coastal place is Blackpool, so not the best.

We used to love going to Spain, Greece, Portugal in summer and had a timeshare in Portugal, Algarve. Which we loved. Used to try and go for 3 or 4 weeks on a very strict budget. It was cheap then though.

When it came to emigrating the embasssy was open in Manchester and you could go in for advice and read books from their library. Some book I read compared the climate and beaches to the Algarve, thought that will do us.😁

House prices were cheaper which meant we could fulfill another dream to have a house very close to a nice beach. We had a feeling that every weekend for most of the year would be like being on holiday in our timeshare. We weren't far off the mark and still spend heaps of time down the beach. Even more now I'm retired.

We didn't realise that so many English move here, which wasn't a concern or influence one way or the other. It's a strange feeling though that you arrive on the other side of the world and don't feel far from the UK. Lots of Northern English accents for some reason.

We still love where we live, have a great bunch of friends, most met through the local surf club, where we spend a lot of time, kids have done well (eldest was 2 when we came). 

Other than that we didn't have a clue about what Perth and Aus was like. Never been before, never came on holiday, didn't  know anyone here. Just a dream that worked out as we thought it might. We know a lot of expats who think exactly like us. How lucky are we is said very often, usually after a morning ski paddle, swim or some other exercise and a coffee at the beach, with a quick look back at the ocean as we leave for work. Even better when you're retired.😎

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18 hours ago, Dorsetbrit said:

It’s fantastic to hear your over there, our flights hit canceled yesterday for Sydney on the 1st November. We have booked a long flight to Vancouver then Sydney, very quite going that way so I hope it won’t get canceled or bumped of. Ringing lots of airlines clearly there isn’t many airlines bothering with Oz just thought Qantas would be helping get people home but I was wrong. I’m dreading the quarantine but be happy to get to Sydney. We have a three year old so two weeks in a room feels like hell to me but it’s short pain for long gain so we will get on with it. Any tips on what to take and the process of what to expect please let us know. Such as will they do washing for you or can they go to shops so you can buy stuff to clean with? We plan to air b&b for a month so I think we will leave booking that until we are in quarantine just in case the flights canceled again. The stress about getting there and what to expect is exceptional and I just want to start settling down. Good luck and I loved Perth so much but we are state sponsored so Sydney will be our future for the first 2 years.

That's a long way round. 

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1 hour ago, Paul1Perth said:

You got the weather thing right. I think we were typical poms before we emigrated. Lived near Stockport, about as far away from the Coast as you can be, then the nearest coastal place is Blackpool, so not the best.

We used to love going to Spain, Greece, Portugal in summer and had a timeshare in Portugal, Algarve. Which we loved. Used to try and go for 3 or 4 weeks on a very strict budget. It was cheap then though.

When it came to emigrating the embasssy was open in Manchester and you could go in for advice and read books from their library. Some book I read compared the climate and beaches to the Algarve, thought that will do us.😁

House prices were cheaper which meant we could fulfill another dream to have a house very close to a nice beach. We had a feeling that every weekend for most of the year would be like being on holiday in our timeshare. We weren't far off the mark and still spend heaps of time down the beach. Even more now I'm retired.

We didn't realise that so many English move here, which wasn't a concern or influence one way or the other. It's a strange feeling though that you arrive on the other side of the world and don't feel far from the UK. Lots of Northern English accents for some reason.

We still love where we live, have a great bunch of friends, most met through the local surf club, where we spend a lot of time, kids have done well (eldest was 2 when we came). 

Other than that we didn't have a clue about what Perth and Aus was like. Never been before, never came on holiday, didn't  know anyone here. Just a dream that worked out as we thought it might. We know a lot of expats who think exactly like us. How lucky are we is said very often, usually after a morning ski paddle, swim or some other exercise and a coffee at the beach, with a quick look back at the ocean as we leave for work. Even better when you're retired.😎

Wow wow wow and I did like you Paul.....what's wrong with Blackpool?

Cracking place to go for a donkey ride and a look around coral island haha

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On 26/09/2020 at 16:01, Lavers said:

Wow wow wow and I did like you Paul.....what's wrong with Blackpool?

Cracking place to go for a donkey ride and a look around coral island haha

It was always good for a few beers and if you fancied a scrap there were always takers. Coral island sounds nice, can't remember anything so nice sounding being open. The pier and Blackpool tower were the main attractions.

The lights were good as kids.

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Welcome to Oz

Hope you guys are doing well.

Best wishes

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On 25/09/2020 at 11:42, Canada2Australia said:

What is the appeal about Perth to Poms? My understanding is that there is a huge cohort of English in Perth, but I can't understand why the area is such a magnet for them specifically. Is it the assumed perception that the weather is 'perfect' in Perth, above all else? Can anyone explain this?

Just curious.

That question/comment is sure to raise the ire of Perthians everywhere, but I rather concur. I've always enjoyed visiting Perth and there's plenty to see and do, but it does feels a bit sterile. Maybe coming from a dirty northern town I still like to see a bit of grit and grime every now and then. Perth and the surrounds are also very flat, and I like hills - or at least being able to see some hills. And also, being a surfer and not being very good at it means there's much more chance of me becoming a shark biscuit over there!

On a positive note it's much closer to the rest of world for overseas hols, when they're once again allowed 🙂 

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10 hours ago, Wanderer Returns said:

That question/comment is sure to raise the ire of Perthians everywhere, but I rather concur. I've always enjoyed visiting Perth and there's plenty to see and do, but it does feels a bit sterile. Maybe coming from a dirty northern town I still like to see a bit of grit and grime every now and then. Perth and the surrounds are also very flat, and I like hills - or at least being able to see some hills. And also, being a surfer and not being very good at it means there's much more chance of me becoming a shark biscuit over there!

On a positive note it's much closer to the rest of world for overseas hols, when they're once again allowed 🙂 

Sterile and flat?! Move out of the CBD and you'll see a bit more....the hills is an entire region in itself and is...well, hilly as the name suggests. 

If by sterile you mean clean, the CBD is quite a clean city. Very leafy. Lots of green space. Elizabeth Quay was a little bare when first developed but the trees have grown heaps in the past few years and it's looking lovelier every year. 

Perth is a pretty diverse city in terms of suburban areas. Move out of Perth Metro and take your pick. Coastal north or south both have very different vibes, wheatbelt, unbelievable scenery, country areas....so pretty and peaceful. 

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17 hours ago, HappyHeart said:

Sterile and flat?! Move out of the CBD and you'll see a bit more....the hills is an entire region in itself and is...well, hilly as the name suggests. 

If by sterile you mean clean, the CBD is quite a clean city. Very leafy. Lots of green space. Elizabeth Quay was a little bare when first developed but the trees have grown heaps in the past few years and it's looking lovelier every year. 

Perth is a pretty diverse city in terms of suburban areas. Move out of Perth Metro and take your pick. Coastal north or south both have very different vibes, wheatbelt, unbelievable scenery, country areas....so pretty and peaceful. 

Perth is beautiful - if you were to design a new city you'd be hard-pushed to come up with something as nice as Perth. As I mentioned, I found lots to see and do in Perth and the surrounding areas, especially heading south to Margaret River and across to Albany. I hope to return for another visit at some point. But live there? - no thanks. Perth is certainly clean (although anywhere over here is clean by UK standards), but by sterile I mean it all feels a bit soulless, in the same way the suburbs on the Gold Coast do. I think you need a critical mass of people to give a place a sense of community and I found that missing in Perth, and even more so in rural WA. Anyway, that's just my opinion, and I'm happy for anyone who enjoys living over there 🙂 

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2 minutes ago, Wanderer Returns said:

Perth is beautiful - if you were to design a new city you'd be hard-pushed to come up with something as nice as Perth. As I mentioned, I found lots to see and do in Perth and the surrounding areas, especially heading south to Margaret River and across to Albany. I hope to return for another visit at some point. But live there? - no thanks. Perth is certainly clean (although anywhere over here is clean by UK standards), but by sterile I mean it all feels a bit soulless, in the same way the suburbs on the Gold Coast do. I think you need a critical mass of people to give a place a sense of community and I found that missing in Perth, and even more so in rural WA. Anyway, that's just my opinion, and I'm happy for anyone who enjoys living over there 🙂 

Good clarification thanks. I often think if Perth is 'quiet' I'd hate to live somewhere that wasn't. The metro area is too busy for me and down south is getting busier. So much development. The handful.of times I've been in metro Melbourne I've felt crowded and overwhelmed.

Its interesting as we all have different needs. To me the soul of a place is tied up in the natural world. Without that I feel it definitely 'soulless' 

Probably why I'm not that keen on cities. 

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Just now, HappyHeart said:

Good clarification thanks. I often think if Perth is 'quiet' I'd hate to live somewhere that wasn't. The metro area is too busy for me and down south is getting busier. So much development. The handful.of times I've been in metro Melbourne I've felt crowded and overwhelmed.

Interestingly the smaller the population, the greater the sense of community in my experience living here. 

Its interesting as we all have different needs. To me the soul of a place is tied up in the natural world. Without that I feel it definitely 'soulless' 

Probably why I'm not that keen on cities. 

 

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2 hours ago, HappyHeart said:

Good clarification thanks. I often think if Perth is 'quiet' I'd hate to live somewhere that wasn't. The metro area is too busy for me and down south is getting busier. So much development. The handful.of times I've been in metro Melbourne I've felt crowded and overwhelmed.

Its interesting as we all have different needs. To me the soul of a place is tied up in the natural world. Without that I feel it definitely 'soulless' 

Probably why I'm not that keen on cities. 

When I first came to Australia as a tourist 22 years ago, I couldn't imagine wanting to live anywhere other than Sydney. Having lived there for a year when I migrated in 2003, I decided it was too much like 'London in the sun' for me (where I'd been for the previous 5 years). When I moved to Brisbane in 2004 my friends in Sydney said it was like Hicksville and I'd be back within a year. Now I find Brissie a bit too busy - although I still think it's more liveable than Sydney and Melbourne. We moved to Caloundra about two months ago and I've hardly given the bright lights an hour south a second thought. It's interesting how your tastes and needs change as the years roll by.

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58 minutes ago, Wanderer Returns said:

When I first came to Australia as a tourist 22 years ago, I couldn't imagine wanting to live anywhere other than Sydney. Having lived there for a year when I migrated in 2003, I decided it was too much like 'London in the sun' for me (where I'd been for the previous 5 years). When I moved to Brisbane in 2004 my friends in Sydney said it was like Hicksville and I'd be back within a year. Now I find Brissie a bit too busy - although I still think it's more liveable than Sydney and Melbourne. We moved to Caloundra about two months ago and I've hardly given the bright lights an hour south a second thought. It's interesting how your tastes and needs change as the years roll by.

Our son plans to travel snd wants to live in different countries for periods of time. Itll be intetesting to see whete he ends up long term. 

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16 minutes ago, HappyHeart said:

Our son plans to travel snd wants to live in different countries for periods of time. Itll be intetesting to see whete he ends up long term. 

Much as though we all love Australia, let's hope they'll let us leave again (and return!) one day 🙂 

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32 minutes ago, Wanderer Returns said:

Much as though we all love Australia, let's hope they'll let us leave again (and return!) one day 🙂 

You can leave any time you want.  One of the reasons for a travel exemption is intending to travel overseas for over three months.  So unless your travel plan is under three months, there is practically nothing that stops you from leaving.

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On 25/09/2020 at 11:42, Canada2Australia said:

What is the appeal about Perth to Poms? My understanding is that there is a huge cohort of English in Perth, but I can't understand why the area is such a magnet for them specifically. Is it the assumed perception that the weather is 'perfect' in Perth, above all else? Can anyone explain this?

Just curious.

Good place for a holiday but I couldn’t live there.  Far too isolated for starters...

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Same. Though at the moment, compared with Melbourne, it will be full of life!

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