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rtritudr

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About rtritudr

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  1. rtritudr

    Flights to Australia - reliability?

    More than twenty. NSW is investigating a case right now: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-15/nsw-hotel-quarantine-covid19-case-possible-spread-breach/100218310 NSW health authorities investigate possible COVID-19 transmission in hotel quarantine
  2. rtritudr

    Flights to Australia - reliability?

    With the number of people who end up getting infected during hotel quarantine in Australia, I'd say that coming fully vaccinated is a really good idea.
  3. rtritudr

    Autism and visa

    Right, but I think the OP has only spent a total of 15 months in Australia so they'd have to spend a few months more in Australia before their children are eligible to apply for citizenship based on descent.
  4. rtritudr

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    https://www1.racgp.org.au/newsgp/clinical/heart-inflammation-linked-to-small-number-of-pfize Myocarditis linked to small number of Pfizer recipients in Israel
  5. rtritudr

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    It could also be a coordinated effort to scare the public into getting the vaccination, precisely for the reasons that you've outlined.
  6. rtritudr

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    1. Sure, I totally agree with your points on the benefits of opening the border. I am just playing the devil's advocate here. 2. I think we *are* asking them to take a hit though. The blood clot issue is real and people have died as a result. Sure it's not a huge death rate but think of it from their point-of-view. If we didn't have to open the borders then they wouldn't have to take this risk so they are doing this purely (or mostly if you include the risk from quarantine leaks but experience has shown that to be manageable) for the benefit of others.
  7. rtritudr

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    That is precisely the present problem. We have people who can't wait to get the borders reopened, whether it be for commerce, compassionate reasons, or whatever. On the other hand we have people who have no interest in seeing the borders reopened, they may in fact quite like the fact that the migration tap has been sealed shut. We are now asking for everyone in the second group to take a hit for the team to reopen the borders, possibly at risk of death or injury, is this really fair?
  8. rtritudr

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    Why should they help with opening the border if they don't care about it, or worse what if they'd prefer to keep it closed? Australian voters have time and again reaffirmed the Coalition's policies on immigration so it's not clear that they would prefer to open up the borders as soon as possible.
  9. rtritudr

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    Perhaps, but on the flip-side, the majority (2/3) of early cases had no epidemiological links to that market at all (i.e., not a close contact of someone who went to the market). In fact, phylogenetic studies showed that all cases tied to the market had identical genomes while the other cases had more (albeit small, as in a single mutation) diversity. This indicates that the Huanan Market probably wasn't the origin of the virus, but merely a place where there was a superspreader event.
  10. rtritudr

    Border opening now mid 2022

    It's not as simple as that though. If Melbourne achieved that level of vaccination today, even if its own healthcare system won't be overwhelmed by the virus, it'll still have to be locked down because if the virus is circulating at all in the city, then its people will be barred from entering all the other states in Australia, as well as NZ. Unless the entire travel bubble has achieved herd immunity, no single part of it can abandon the zero-Covid strategy. Either that or the bubble will burst.
  11. rtritudr

    Opening of international borders

    Something that's often overlooked here is that even now the USA still bars all foreigners from entering if they have set foot in the EU/UK in the past 14 days. While the UK requires people from the USA to quarantine upon arrival. Until those countries fully open up to each other, I think it's a bit premature to talk about Australia opening up its borders.
  12. rtritudr

    Opening of international borders

    Keeping the borders closed is always a vote-winner in Australia, it's a natural extension of the anti-immigration politics of the past. Of course it's bad for the economy, but Australian voters generally place border/national security above the economy (they haven't experienced a recession since the early 90s, not counting the present technical recession).
  13. rtritudr

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    Nobody knows right now, but thanks to the US and the UK we will find out by 2022
  14. rtritudr

    Travel exemption/Partner Visa

    It depends on what visa the partner currently holds. If they hold 100/309/801/820 then no exemption is required. Otherwise an exemption is needed to verify the relationship and eligibility: https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/immediate-family-australian-citizens-or-permanent-residents-or-new-zealand-citizens-usually-resident-australia
  15. rtritudr

    Border opening now mid 2022

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