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Help- Subclass 836 carer visa


kikice

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Hi all

A friend of mine has applied from turist visa to carer 836 subclass. She has dependant aged 6 and needs to start school. Does she need pay public school fee as international student or is it free for dependant under this subclass? Thank you in advance.

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The website says it’s taking around 7 years for carer visa approval so one would assume that she and her dependent would be on a bridging visa with the same conditions as the visa they arrived on in which case education would not be free. However if the carer visa is approved then education would cost the same as it costs any other Australian child.  Proving that someone needs a carer and there are no other services available is going to be a difficult task.

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Of course it's not free. Education is a massive cost to the taxpayer and the family we are talking about entered Australia as tourists.

I'm frankly amazed at what people think is free from a country that you've just turned up in.

Most Australian families don't pay enough tax to cover the education their kids get. If they start giving it out to free to everyone the tax burden will get even greater.

 

(Note - I might be feeling a little sore as I just had a chat with my accountant and it appears after 2 years on a 190 visa I've already given the AUS taxman over 250k in tax and as my kids are still in the UK doing their uni over there I'm struggling to see what I got out of that 250k)

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On 27/05/2024 at 14:27, wrussell said:

Whether there are school fees depends on the state. Sometimes there is no charge.

Thank you for your reply. Sorry, what do you mean " sometimes there is no charge"? Is there any chance the child gets free schooling? Can you advise me?

Thank you in advance.

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2 hours ago, kikice said:

They are in Victoria. Which state offers free schooling? Thank you

 

So just to clarify, she is currently on a tourist visa in Victoria?

Remember, even if the schooling is nominally free. there are still many requirements to meet, such as books, uniform, "voluntary" contributions etc. It can still add up to a few thousand dollars.

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10 hours ago, kikice said:

They are in Victoria. Which state offers free schooling? Thank you

 

It offers free schooling to those permanent and temporary residents.  Tourists dont get free schooling and on a bridging visa she would have the same conditions as her visa of entry - those on tourist visas usually get 12 weeks but according to this from the application form, those conditions are extended if the student is on a bridging visa.  As the processing time for carers visa now extends into years, there will be a period on a  bridging visa I would have thought.  I think they are charged international fees.

Temporary students on Bridging Visa enrolments are automatically extended and invoiced beyond the initial enrolment end date outlined above, as the vast
majority of students study beyond the initial enrolment period. Please advise IED at international.school.support@education.vic.gov.au towards the end of the
enrolment period if the student is not extending their stay in school.

 

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We are in the middle of opening a new office and will not have reliable internet for a week or so. For visa applicants sponsored into NSW for permanent residence by an Australian citizen school fees do not apply. Principals who make decisions about fees are not all aware of this and have to be formally advised.

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14 hours ago, Nemesis said:

So just to clarify, she is currently on a tourist visa in Victoria?

Remember, even if the schooling is nominally free. there are still many requirements to meet, such as books, uniform, "voluntary" contributions etc. It can still add up to a few thousand dollars.

They are on a bridging visa at the moment ( they came on a tourist visa and applied for a carer visa). They asked some public schools near them, and the fee is $300 per week. Just to mention, the parents have no right to work. They all four live from their relative/sponsor's disability pension.

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33 minutes ago, kikice said:

They are on a bridging visa at the moment ( they came on a tourist visa and applied for a carer visa). They asked some public schools near them, and the fee is $300 per week. Just to mention, the parents have no right to work. They all four live from their relative/sponsor's disability pension.

This sounds unsustainable even without school fees.

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1 hour ago, kikice said:

They are on a bridging visa at the moment ( they came on a tourist visa and applied for a carer visa). They asked some public schools near them, and the fee is $300 per week. Just to mention, the parents have no right to work. They all four live from their relative/sponsor's disability pension.

If they are living on the relative/sponsor's disability pension surely it would be less expensive for the disabled person to get help from here in Australia.  I have very elderly neighbours who get help with house cleaning and a nurse coming to the house etc.  They don't rely on family or relatives for help.  I'm not sure how that all works though.

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3 hours ago, Toots said:

If they are living on the relative/sponsor's disability pension surely it would be less expensive for the disabled person to get help from here in Australia. 

I agree.  I'm guessing the real motive is not for the sponsor's benefit but for the family. They think they have a chance of a better life in Australia if they can get the visa.  However as Quoll points out, the waiting time for the visa is at least 7 years, and that's a long time to survive without being able to work, and having to pay school fees.   

Also there's always the chance that the visa will be rejected.

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, kikice said:

They are on a bridging visa at the moment ( they came on a tourist visa and applied for a carer visa). They asked some public schools near them, and the fee is $300 per week. Just to mention, the parents have no right to work. They all four live from their relative/sponsor's disability pension.

Of course they have no work rights, they arrived as tourists. Same with regard to school fees. Sorry if this sounds harsh, but just imagine if everyone who fancied living in Australia arrived as a tourist and applied for something else on which they knew it would take years to get a decision, and immediately became eligible for work rights and free education.

Living on the sponsor's pension? Thats not going to be sustainable, just how did they expect to live for the next few years?

For a start I don't imagine the Australian tax payer would be too happy, and a lot of them are anti-immigration already.

When you apply for a visa like this and go on to a long-term bridging visa you need to accept the limitations - or go home and wait for the grant from there. 

Edited by Nemesis
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2 hours ago, Nemesis said:

Of course they have no work rights, they arrived as tourists. Same with regard to school fees. Sorry if this sounds harsh, but just imagine if everyone who fancied living in Australia arrived as a tourist and applied for something else on which they knew it would take years to get a decision, and immediately became eligible for work rights and free education.

Bridging visas to all the following visas have nil conditions when applied for when holding a visitor visa (i.e. do have work permission):

(i) Subclass 801 (Partner) visa;

(ii) Subclass 804 (Aged Parent) visa;

(iii) Subclass 820 (Partner) visa;

(iv) Subclass 864 (Contributory Aged Parent) visa; and

(v) Subclass 884 (Contributory Aged Parent (Temporary)) visa.

(a)  a Business Skills — Business Talent (Permanent) (Class EA) visa; or  

(b)  a Business Skills (Provisional) (Class EB) visa; or 

(c)  a Business Skills (Permanent) (Class EC) visa; or 

(d)  an Employer Nomination (Permanent) (Class EN) visa; or 

(da)  a Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (Provisional) (Class PE) visa; or 

(db)  a Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) (Class PS) visa; or 

(e)  a Regional Employer Nomination (Permanent) (Class RN) visa; or 

(f)  a Skilled — Independent (Permanent) (Class SI) visa; or 

(g)  a Skilled — Nominated (Permanent) (Class SN) visa; or 

(h)  a Skilled — Regional Sponsored (Provisional) (Class SP) visa; or 

(i)  a Skilled (Residence) (Class VB) visa;

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2 minutes ago, paulhand said:

Bridging visas to all the following visas have nil conditions when applied for when holding a visitor visa (i.e. do have work permission):

(i) Subclass 801 (Partner) visa;

(ii) Subclass 804 (Aged Parent) visa;

(iii) Subclass 820 (Partner) visa;

(iv) Subclass 864 (Contributory Aged Parent) visa; and

(v) Subclass 884 (Contributory Aged Parent (Temporary)) visa.

(a)  a Business Skills — Business Talent (Permanent) (Class EA) visa; or  

(b)  a Business Skills (Provisional) (Class EB) visa; or 

(c)  a Business Skills (Permanent) (Class EC) visa; or 

(d)  an Employer Nomination (Permanent) (Class EN) visa; or 

(da)  a Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (Provisional) (Class PE) visa; or 

(db)  a Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) (Class PS) visa; or 

(e)  a Regional Employer Nomination (Permanent) (Class RN) visa; or 

(f)  a Skilled — Independent (Permanent) (Class SI) visa; or 

(g)  a Skilled — Nominated (Permanent) (Class SN) visa; or 

(h)  a Skilled — Regional Sponsored (Provisional) (Class SP) visa; or 

(i)  a Skilled (Residence) (Class VB) visa;

Oh I know some visa subclasses do allow automatic working rights wile bridging, but I don't believe the Carer Visa is one of them (and personally I don't believe it should be one of them) and that is the one we are discussing in this thread. So the OP should have been done some research and been prepared for the fact that the working rights would not be there. And should have come with sufficient resources to sustain the family during the wait for a decision.

Of course, they could always appeal to the Department on the grounds of hardship, however then my comment about the Australian taxpayer comes into play!

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