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Dual Citizenship Question


vegemight82

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Hi Again

Cant seem to see this mentioned in other threads but wondering about 'dual citizenship' RE; having 2 passports?

I know its easy using the UK passport getting out of Australia but difficult getting back in on it - especially last time. 

Once I got into Australia the immigration officer did mention that something hadn't been finalized on their end, even though I've had my ceremony etc but it was corrected.

So now my question is - do you have to get an Australian passport even though I'm considered a dual citizen? The fact its going up twice this year just getting it in early/thinking of the $$

Anyone else face this problem? Past experiences and advice appreciated please.

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, vegemight82 said:

Hi Again

Cant seem to see this mentioned in other threads but wondering about 'dual citizenship' RE; having 2 passports?

I know its easy using the UK passport getting out of Australia but difficult getting back in on it - especially last time. 

Once I got into Australia the immigration officer did mention that something hadn't been finalized on their end, even though I've had my ceremony etc but it was corrected.

So now my question is - do you have to get an Australian passport even though I'm considered a dual citizen? The fact its going up twice this year just getting it in early/thinking of the $$

Anyone else face this problem? Past experiences and advice appreciated please.

 

 

 

 

 

Dual citizens need an Australian passport to re enter as they are not allowed to hold a visa attached to any other passport from a different country

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2 hours ago, vegemight82 said:

So now my question is - do you have to get an Australian passport even though I'm considered a dual citizen?

As an Australian, you don't need a passport to enter Australia, because they're not allowed to refuse you entry.  However as you discovered, if you don't have a passport, they will faff you around for hours and it's really not worth the hassle.

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

As an Australian, you don't need a passport to enter Australia, because they're not allowed to refuse you entry.  However as you discovered, if you don't have a passport, they will faff you around for hours and it's really not worth the hassle.

I'm more than happy to be faffed around if it means that I can save AUD500 which is the cost of an overseas Australian passport application.  My foreign passport only cost me AUD72.

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

As an Australian, you don't need a passport to enter Australia, because they're not allowed to refuse you entry.  However as you discovered, if you don't have a passport, they will faff you around for hours and it's really not worth the hassle.

lol yeah - The drama I got at both Spain & Bail airports where they wanted proof. All I could show was a pic of my ceremony. But there was something not 100% (clerical error?) complete about my submission? They apologized. We found it fascinating that the guy was using Whatsapp to communicate with Australia immigration (guess its quicker?)

I'm also surprised how unclear dual is (as far as my experience anyway?) my immigration officer never mentioned anything about having to get an Aussie passport as well as my British one. I just assumed it was added to the chip inside the passport? Anyway - guess I'll just buy the Aussie one before it goes up in price.

Thanks guys.

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2 hours ago, rtritudr said:

I'm more than happy to be faffed around if it means that I can save AUD500 which is the cost of an overseas Australian passport application.  My foreign passport only cost me AUD72.

I would be surprised if they let you on the plane to Australia without an Australian passport.

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8 hours ago, vegemight82 said:

lol yeah - The drama I got at both Spain & Bail airports where they wanted proof. All I could show was a pic of my ceremony. But there was something not 100% (clerical error?) complete about my submission? They apologized. We found it fascinating that the guy was using Whatsapp to communicate with Australia immigration (guess its quicker?)

I'm also surprised how unclear dual is (as far as my experience anyway?) my immigration officer never mentioned anything about having to get an Aussie passport as well as my British one. I just assumed it was added to the chip inside the passport? Anyway - guess I'll just buy the Aussie one before it goes up in price.

Thanks guys.

The Australian government can't possibly add anything to a British passport chip - that's down to the British government to do, its their property. The Aus government doesn't even need to tell the British government when you become a citizen, its outside their remit. The onus has to be on the new citizen to look up their responsibilities - such as things like enrolling to vote, as well as getting a passport. 

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6 hours ago, Blue Manna said:

I would be surprised if they let you on the plane to Australia without an Australian passport.

It can be done, but it takes time, turning up with British passport, citizenship certificate and plenty of time can achieve it, as the check in staff then check with Aus Immigration as to your status. But it takes up everyone's time and makes you very unpopular not just at check in, but t all transit stops and when coming through Immigration to enter Australia. 

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7 minutes ago, Nemesis said:

It can be done, but it takes time, turning up with British passport, citizenship certificate and plenty of time can achieve it, as the check in staff then check with Aus Immigration as to your status. But it takes up everyone's time and makes you very unpopular not just at check in, but t all transit stops and when coming through Immigration to enter Australia. 

I know they did that during COVID. Good to know it still works.

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2 hours ago, Blue Manna said:

I know they did that during COVID. Good to know it still works.

They've always done it, I have friends who had to do it about ten years back owing to a sudden family death, and I'm in a facebook group where people have done it this year - in their case they didn't realise being  citizen meant they should get a passport, similar to the poster above. 

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15 hours ago, rtritudr said:

I'm more than happy to be faffed around if it means that I can save AUD500 which is the cost of an overseas Australian passport application.  My foreign passport only cost me AUD72.

With all due respects, how very inconsiderate (of all the passengers behind) and irresponsible of you. It's one of the responsibilities you take on as a citizen. OK you may get away with it once because you "didn't know" but one day you could come a cropper. Man up and get your passport! 

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15 hours ago, vegemight82 said:

I'm also surprised how unclear dual is (as far as my experience anyway?) my immigration officer never mentioned anything about having to get an Aussie passport as well as my British one. I just assumed it was added to the chip inside the passport

"Dual" just means you've got two separate citizenships which have nothing to do with each other.  

The passport is British so the Australians can't touch it.  And the fact that you've chosen to be an Aussie citizen is irrelevant to the Brits.

In fact, it's worth noting that when your UK passport runs out, you don't have to renew that if you don't want to.  If you go on holiday to the UK, you'll be able to enter on your Aussie passport as a tourist and no one will be any the wiser.  Not strictly what you should do but it works.

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

"Dual" just means you've got two separate citizenships which have nothing to do with each other.  

The passport is British so the Australians can't touch it.  And the fact that you've chosen to be an Aussie citizen is irrelevant to the Brits.

In fact, it's worth noting that when your UK passport runs out, you don't have to renew that if you don't want to.  If you go on holiday to the UK, you'll be able to enter on your Aussie passport as a tourist and no one will be any the wiser.  Not strictly what you should do but it works.

Tbh I've never understood why Australia insists on it. I've always wondered whether other countries are more like the UK, or more like Australia.

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"The onus has to be on the new citizen to look up their responsibilities - such as things like enrolling to vote, as well as getting a passport."

Don't mention the voting lol waiting 3 hours on weekend! 

I get it, just feel it could be explained better or even part of the vast amount spent on getting the visa/s could go towards the passport?

I'll probably get the Aussie one soon since we are heading to Europe in December again.

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1 hour ago, Blue Manna said:

Tbh I've never understood why Australia insists on it. I've always wondered whether other countries are more like the UK, or more like Australia.

I don't know about most other countries but Dual nationals traveling to the United States are required to enter and depart the U.S. using their U.S. passport

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1 hour ago, Blue Manna said:

Tbh I've never understood why Australia insists on it. I've always wondered whether other countries are more like the UK, or more like Australia.

The USA is the same - and I believe enforces it even more strictly than Australia - no simply wave your citizenship certificate & make a phone call, its no Passport = No Entry.

Canada has gone down the same road in the last few years too. If you are a Canadian citizen, you need an  Canadian passport. 

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1 hour ago, vegemight82 said:

"The onus has to be on the new citizen to look up their responsibilities - such as things like enrolling to vote, as well as getting a passport."

Don't mention the voting lol waiting 3 hours on weekend! 

I get it, just feel it could be explained better or even part of the vast amount spent on getting the visa/s could go towards the passport?

I'll probably get the Aussie one soon since we are heading to Europe in December again.

My memory is a little hazy as it was a few years ago, but I'm sure I was given a list of things that I needed to be aware of, like "responsibilities of a citizen" which included the passport issue, as well as being given a form to enrol to vote, when I went to the ceremony - even though I already knew about both of them from being on forums like this for many years

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9 minutes ago, Nemesis said:

My memory is a little hazy as it was a few years ago, but I'm sure I was given a list of things that I needed to be aware of, like "responsibilities of a citizen" which included the passport issue, as well as being given a form to enrol to vote, when I went to the ceremony - even though I already knew about both of them from being on forums like this for many years

I never gave it a second thought once I was an Australian citizen.  It was just common sense to apply for an Australian passport especially if I was going to travel.  Not so urgent if you're not planning to travel out of the country for a while.

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2 hours ago, Blue Manna said:

Tbh I've never understood why Australia insists on it. I've always wondered whether other countries are more like the UK, or more like Australia.

The UK insists on it too. 

The thing is, if you are entering any country as a permanent resident, you need to have a travel document that proves you are a permanent resident.  A British passport without a current Australian visa doesn't prove you're a permanent resident of Australia.

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32 minutes ago, Nemesis said:

My memory is a little hazy as it was a few years ago, but I'm sure I was given a list of things that I needed to be aware of, like "responsibilities of a citizen" which included the passport issue, as well as being given a form to enrol to vote, when I went to the ceremony - even though I already knew about both of them from being on forums like this for many years

Little to no info for me, my "ceremony" was at the height of Covid so didn't get much info besides take your mask off for the picture.

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19 hours ago, Blue Manna said:

I would be surprised if they let you on the plane to Australia without an Australian passport.

Worked for me with no issues.  Just a quick call to the back office at check-in to confirm my citizenship, and only a short delay in Sydney to be processed as an undocumented citizen.

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6 hours ago, Quoll said:

With all due respects, how very inconsiderate (of all the passengers behind) and irresponsible of you. It's one of the responsibilities you take on as a citizen. OK you may get away with it once because you "didn't know" but one day you could come a cropper. Man up and get your passport! 

It is not the responsibility of an Australian citizen to overpay for a piece of document that costs less than AUD50 to produce.  Perhaps you're happy to pay taxes for those super-expensive submarines but that's your choice, not mine.

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8 hours ago, Blue Manna said:

Tbh I've never understood why Australia insists on it. I've always wondered whether other countries are more like the UK, or more like Australia.

Britain is thinking about doing it soon too I understand - and about time too!

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3 hours ago, rtritudr said:

It is not the responsibility of an Australian citizen to overpay for a piece of document that costs less than AUD50 to produce.  Perhaps you're happy to pay taxes for those super-expensive submarines but that's your choice, not mine.

It is your responsibility as a citizen to be able to verify your citizenship easily.  None of us like paying for it but then, perhaps you dont want to be a citizen - are you living in Australia or overseas?  Again, if overseas that's the penalty you pay for not living onshore.  You can always rescind your citizenship and travel on e-visas, much cheaper

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