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Corrina

Cost of moving to Oz

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9 hours ago, Corrina said:

Thanks again Amber. Now you mention that, yes I think that's what it was. I haven't looked at the 482. I will though thanks. 

 

The 482 seems like a good option because it means an employer will pay some of your costs (though they're willing to pay less and less these days), but it's a trap for the unwary.  

The 482 is a temporary visa, designed to allow employers to fill a short-term vacancy.  The government wants you to go home at the end and would prefer the employer to then hire a local candidate.  It grudgingly offers you the possibility that you might be able to apply for PR at the end of the contract.  That's often referred to as a "transition to PR" but it's nowhere near as smooth or predictable as that.  The biggest risk is that if you take the 482, you're pushing your PR application into the future, and who knows what the rules will be by then?   The Australian government is steadily closing the doors to migrants, making the rules stricter and stricter every year - so we see a lot of families who arrive on a temp visa and then find, when the time comes, that they're no longer eligible for PR.  They end up back in the UK, worse off financially than when they left. 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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2 minutes ago, cheese n pickle said:

5k for a family? It cost me almost that much just to ship my dog 🙂

Good God!! 😂😂 

But yeah, but that's because their employers paid for the visas, flights, shipping container and first week in a cheap hotel!!... Talk about Lucky eh! 

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5 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

The 482 seems like a good option because it means an employer will pay some of your costs (though they're willing to pay less and less these days), but it's a trap for the unwary.  

The 482 is a temporary visa, designed to allow employers to fill a short-term vacancy.  The government wants you to go home at the end and would prefer the employer to then hire a local candidate.  It grudgingly offers you the possibility that you might be able to apply for PR at the end of the contract.  That's often referred to as a "transition to PR" but it's nowhere near as smooth or predictable as that.  The biggest risk is that if you take the 482, you're pushing your PR application into the future, and who knows what the rules will be by then?   The Australian government is steadily closing the doors to migrants, making the rules stricter and stricter every year - so we see a lot of families who arrive on a temp visa and then find, when the time comes, that they're no longer eligible for PR.  They end up back in the UK, worse off financially than when they left. 

Thanks Marisa. That's great advice. I will have to have a good look at this then. You've given me a lot to consider. 

You sound like one of those people that everyone wants to take with them to the pub quiz. I love it 😍👍

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I emigrated 16 year ago on a 457visa and was not lucky enough to get flights paid for. Even 16 years ago it cost us more than 5k then. I do think around the 30k  is very realistic . Good luck with the move 

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23 minutes ago, Corrina said:

Thanks Marisa. That's great advice. I will have to have a good look at this then. You've given me a lot to consider. 

You sound like one of those people that everyone wants to take with them to the pub quiz. I love it 😍👍

I get told off sometimes for painting too negative a picture, but I think people need to go into these things with their eyes open.   On the plus side, the 482 is a great option if you're prepared to have an adventure.  Plan on the basis that you'll be going home after 4 years, (e.g. don't get a car lease, don't buy a home, and make sure the employer pays the bulk of your relocation costs).  Then if by some lucky chance you do get PR, that's a bonus.  However, having a 16-year-old means you need to think carefully about a short-term stay.

As for who migrates - I think we still have the image of the Ten Pound Poms in the back of our minds. The fact is that these days, the occupation list is short, and composed mainly of highly skilled professions - people who are already earning a good salary in the UK, so they can afford the expensive move.  Since being on this forum, I've been astonished how many of them fly home for an annual visit, or have parents over every year.  Whereas I, and other migrants of my vintage (migrated in the '80's) couldn't afford to go home at all for the first few years - and even thereafter, I had to budget carefully to manage a visit every 2 years.

I think another thing that made it more affordable in years gone by, was that housing was cheap (whereas Australia now has some of the worst housing affordability in the world), and jobs were plentiful, so there was a good chance you'd get a job within weeks of landing (whereas now, unemployment is as bad as the UK - and new arrivals aren't eligible for benefits).

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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19 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

 

I get told off sometimes for painting too negative a picture, but I think people need to go into these things with their eyes open.   On the plus side, the 482 is a great option if you're prepared to have an adventure.  Plan on the basis that you'll be going home after 4 years, (e.g. don't get a car lease, don't buy a home, and make sure the employer pays the bulk of your relocation costs).  Then if by some lucky chance you do get PR, that's a bonus.  However, having a 16-year-old means you need to think carefully about a short-term stay.

As for who migrates - I think we still have the image of the Ten Pound Poms in the back of our minds. The fact is that these days, the occupation list is short, and composed mainly of highly skilled professions - people who are already earning a good salary in the UK, so they can afford the expensive move.  Since being on this forum, I've been astonished how many of them fly home for an annual visit, or have parents over every year.  Whereas I, and other migrants of my vintage (migrated in the '80's) couldn't afford to go home at all for the first few years - and even thereafter, I had to budget carefully to manage a visit every 2 years.

I think another thing that made it more affordable in years gone by, was that housing was cheap (whereas Australia now has some of the worst housing affordability in the world), and jobs were plentiful, so there was a good chance you'd get a job within weeks of landing (whereas now, unemployment is as bad as the UK - and new arrivals aren't eligible for benefits).

Well, I appreciate your honesty actually. I like (and need) to hear the negatives as much as the positives. It helps me balance them better. And if I've got worse case scenario in my head then, it can only get better!! 😊 

I totally get old feelings of previous immigrants who couldn't afford what those do now. 

Thanks again 

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38 minutes ago, Cainey said:

I emigrated 16 year ago on a 457visa and was not lucky enough to get flights paid for. Even 16 years ago it cost us more than 5k then. I do think around the 30k  is very realistic . Good luck with the move 

Thanks so much Cainey. Yeah I think shock hit me first when I saw that figure but on reflection, I can understand how it mounts up to that....I'd better start doing the lottery 😉

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You say many that emigrate couldn’t afford the high figures quoted but they somehow just do. Many will take the costs out of the sale of their house/borrow etc.  I bet many go into debt to achieve it. You’ve now realised that before anything else you have the visas (£7k), flights (£3k), quarantine (£4k) and a few weeks in a holiday rental, even bargain basement will be £2k. That’s £16k gone before you’ve started. Those figures are undisputed. Then you’ll need to pay a bond on your first rental which will be about $2k plus a months rent in advance. You’ll need a rental car (will ignore buying one as you could argue you’ve sold a car so will just buy again for the same amount) you’re almost at £20k before you’ve done anything. Factor in a few months of not working, furniture, school uniform etc and it’s eye watering. One thing to be aware of. If your 16 year old plans to go to uni then if you have PR they will get domestic rates rather than be considered as an international student. This is good news as cheaper but only citizens can get the equivalent of our student loans so as PR the fees will have to be paid for in full. Another eye watering amount to find upfront when the time comes.  

Best of luck and I hope it all works out for you. 

Edited by Tulip1
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2 minutes ago, Corrina said:

I totally get old feelings of previous immigrants who couldn't afford what those do now. 

I think you're misunderstanding - I'm not complaining that we had it tough, because we didn't.  I'm saying that in the past, most migrants were as you described - migrating because they weren't doing well financially in the UK.  Naturally enough, even though we were better off in Australia, it took time to build up to the kind of lifestyle where we could afford - or wanted to afford - expensive holidays every year. 

Today's migrants who fly home every year are not people who weren't doing well financially in the UK.  They are professionals who were already comfortably-off in the UK.  Sometimes I wonder why such people want to migrate to Australia at all, TBH!   

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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2 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

You say many that emigrate couldn’t afford the high figures quoted but they somehow just do. Many will take the costs out of the sale of their house/borrow etc.  I bet many go into debt to achieve it. You’ve now realised that before anything else you have the visas (£7k), flights (£3k), quarantine (£4k) and a few weeks in a holiday rental, even bargain basement will be £2k. That’s £16k gone before you’ve started. Those figures are undisputed. Then you’ll need to pay a bond on your first rental which will be about $2k plus a months rent in advance. You’ll need a rental car (will ignore buying one as you could argue you’ve sold a car so will just buy again for the same amount) you’re almost at £20k before you’ve done anything. Factor in a few months of not working, furniture, school uniform etc and it’s eye watering. One thing to be aware of. If your 16 year old plans to go to uni then if you have PR they will get domestic rates rather than be considered as an international student. This is good news as cheaper but only citizens can get the equivalent of our student loans so as PR the fees will have to be paid for in full. Another eye watering amount to find upfront when the time comes.  

Best of luck and I hope it all works out for you. 

Hi Tulip, 

Thank you. I appreciate all the raw but honest advice. The things that people don't really tell you or talk about!... Where was all of this on Wanted Down Under?? 😂 It's true though, people do manage it, even if they don't have the finances secured. I hope that their dreams work out for them, even if just for a short time. 

We do have the money to go for it, but I sure wish I could know that we'd manage to recoup it eventually through higher salaries. Then it would all be worth it. 

Our daughter is happy to wait a bit longer to head off to uni. She doesn't feel ready for it all just yet but is currently in college. She would like a few gap years until she feels ready to commit. She's only 16. It's so young if you're still not sure about the world. 

So her not wanting to rush into training might be a blessing for now. It might offer us more time to see if we can secure PR 🤞 

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1 minute ago, Marisawright said:

I think you're misunderstanding - I'm not complaining that we had it tough, because we didn't.  I'm saying that in the past, most migrants were as you described - migrating because they weren't doing well financially in the UK.  Naturally enough, even though we were better off in Australia, it took time to build up to the kind of lifestyle where we could afford - or wanted to afford - expensive holidays every year. 

Today's migrants who fly home every year are not people who weren't doing well financially in the UK.  They are professionals who were already comfortably-off in the UK.  Sometimes I wonder why such people want to migrate to Australia at all, TBH!   

Yeah, I get you. But for the same jobs and same pressures, Australia generally offers higher salaries (often doubled), and a much better climate. It appears to have a far more laid back approach to life which, in the UK can sadly be missing... A lot! A more outdoorsy lifestyle is also very appealing...we'd up sticks and move there for this even if the salaries were lower. And the thought of being at the other side of the world and closer to even more amazing countries to see and hopefully explore in time, is well worth the upheaval. 

We love the idea of a family adventure. Seeing new things we've only seen in books, learning another countries history and culture, meeting new people... Stepping right out of our comfort zone....and ultimately showing our children the world 🌏 it couldn't be better. 

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27 minutes ago, Corrina said:

Where was all of this on Wanted Down Under?? 😂 It's true though, people do manage it, even if they don't have the finances secured. I hope that their dreams work out for them, even if just for a short time. 

We do have the money to go for it, but I sure wish I could know that we'd manage to recoup it eventually through higher salaries. Then it would all be worth it. 

Our daughter is happy to wait a bit longer to head off to uni. She doesn't feel ready for it all just yet but is currently in college. She would like a few gap years until she feels ready to commit. She's only 16. It's so young if you're still not sure about the world. 

Well, even Wanted Down Under mentions that about half of all migrants end up going home (it's a statistic that's difficult to check BTW so not sure if it's accurate).  

Have you checked whether you would, in fact, be earning higher salaries?  I've never heard of anyone getting double their UK salary or anywhere close to it, after taking into account the cost of housing/living.   For many occupations, it works out much the same, and you just have to accept those initial costs are the price you pay for the lifestyle you prefer.  I have no idea how social work pay compares but perhaps someone else can advise. 

Work/life balance - I don't know why people quote this so often. You'll be working the same hours as you do in the UK (office hours in Australia now are often 8.30 to 5.30, and everyone gets 4 weeks leave and 10 days paid sick leave). Employers are no more laid-back in their attitudes than in the UK.  So, the balance will be much the same - the only difference is how you spend your free time.  If you're able to get a job in a coastal city away from the capitals, you may be able to afford a home near the beach - in the capitals, beachside real estate is for the wealthy.  Home and Away is filmed in a part of Sydney where homes cost several million each.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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2 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Well, even Wanted Down Under mentions that about half of all migrants end up going home (it's a statistic that's difficult to check BTW so not sure if it's accurate).  

Have you checked whether you would, in fact, be earning higher salaries, after taking into account the cost of housing/living?   For many occupations, it works out much the same, and you just have to accept those initial costs are the price you pay for the lifestyle you prefer.  I have no idea how social work pay compares but perhaps someone else can advise. 

I have checked, as much as I can and some states are different to others. It can be similar pay or much higher. But its always higher. And more still if management roles are your path. I have experience in both public and private sectors and I know what I want and what we need as a family. We wouldn't be considering it otherwise.

I have looked into state statistics, property prices, utilities, crime rates, fuel, leisure, Internet access, flights out.... Oooh so many more things. But I do know we'd be better off financially there, but absolutely that's not the main reason for the move. We'd be happy to stay on parr with current earnings if needed....But I think this is going a tad  off topic. 

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19 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Well, even Wanted Down Under mentions that about half of all migrants end up going home (it's a statistic that's difficult to check BTW so not sure if it's accurate).  

Have you checked whether you would, in fact, be earning higher salaries?  I've never heard of anyone getting double their UK salary or anywhere close to it, after taking into account the cost of housing/living.   For many occupations, it works out much the same, and you just have to accept those initial costs are the price you pay for the lifestyle you prefer.  I have no idea how social work pay compares but perhaps someone else can advise. 

Work/life balance - I don't know why people quote this so often. You'll be working the same hours as you do in the UK (office hours in Australia now are often 8.30 to 5.30, and everyone gets 4 weeks leave and 10 days paid sick leave). Employers are no more laid-back in their attitudes than in the UK.  So, the balance will be much the same - the only difference is how you spend your free time.  If you're able to get a job in a coastal city away from the capitals, you may be able to afford a home near the beach - in the capitals, beachside real estate is for the wealthy.  Home and Away is filmed in a part of Sydney where homes cost several million each.

I agree with you. I think it would be naive to assume that work life would be so different. In our line of work particularly. I have friends who have moved to Australia over the years. Most of them social workers, and I've asked them lots of questions believe me. 

We don't want to live in a city. Perhaps an hour or so away. We prefer more quiet, community orientated suburbs. 😊

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Everyone keeps going on about how high the cost of housing is here. Yes of course Sydney and Melbourne are very high, but so is London and it must depend on where you move from in UK to where you end up living here.

For instance my old village In Nottingham the median house price is 355, 305 uk pds equals $644,125

Good schools and fair number of council houses. 20/30 minutes to Nottingham, better public transport.

Median house price Sunshine Coast in my suburb just under $600, 000

slightly higher population here. Good schools much better sporting facilities here. Fairly poor public transport. Better shopping facilities here. 1 hr 15 to Brisbane 

My son lives in a Brisbane suburb, fairly large detached 4 bed house, large block. Valued approx $600, 500

My UK son lives in a suburb in Bristol, 3 bed 30’s semi, with loft extension 4th bedroom Valued 600 500 UK pds nearly double

Similar equivalent incomes.

Obviously these examples are random but they are genuine comparisons 

Edited by ramot
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2 minutes ago, ramot said:

Everyone keeps going on about how high the cost of housing is here. Yes of course Sydney and Melbourne are very high, but it must depend on where you move from in UK to where you end up living here.

For instance my old village In Nottingham the median house price is 355, 305 uk pds equals $644,125

Good schools and fair number of council houses. 20/30 minutes to Nottingham, better public transport.

Median house price Sunshine Coast in my suburb just under $600, 000

slightly higher population here. Good schools much better sporting facilities here. Fairly poor public transport. Better shopping facilities here. 1 hr 15 to Brisbane 

My son lives in a Brisbane suburb, fairly large detached 4 bed house, large block. Valued approx $600, 500

My UK son lives in a suburb in Bristol, 3 bed 30’s semi, with loft extension 4th bedroom Valued 600 500 UK pds nearly double

Similar equivalent incomes.

Obviously these examples are random but they are genuine comparisons 

Hi Ramot. Thanks for your reply. I couldn't agree more. It totally depends on the area you live and which you migrate to. What we have been looking at would offer us a much bigger house, more space, a pool and within half an hour to a beach. And for much much less than what we have here. (which is still lovely here, but Australia is better). 

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Just now, Corrina said:

Hi Ramot. Thanks for your reply. I couldn't agree more. It totally depends on the area you live and which you migrate to. What we have been looking at would offer us a much bigger house, more space, a pool and within half an hour to a beach. And for much much less than what we have here. (which is still lovely here, but Australia is better). 

Not necessarily better, but different. Neither of my sons would swap where they live, both equally happy.

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Just now, ramot said:

Not necessarily better, but different. Neither of my sons would swap where they live, both equally happy.

OK yes, different 😊... And bigger! 

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Beware using current exchange rates to compare salaries, after all the pay doesn’t change with the rate.

To have a comparable  lifestyle you will need 2.2 to 2.5 times in dollars that what you earn in pounds.  So if you earn  £30k that would be $66k to $75k. 
 

Not absolute but a good guide that takes purchasing power into account.  Minimum wage here is $19.84 and average salary is around $85000.  Many get by in much less than that but may have well bought a house when the prices were sensible and have a small or no mortgage.

 

Also check if salary quoted is inclusive or exclusive of super (compulsory employer pension contribution)

Edited by rammygirl
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So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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2 hours ago, Corrina said:

Yeah, I get you. But for the same jobs and same pressures, Australia generally offers higher salaries (often doubled), and a much better climate. It appears to have a far more laid back approach to life which, in the UK can sadly be missing... A lot! A more outdoorsy lifestyle is also very appealing...we'd up sticks and move there for this even if the salaries were lower. And the thought of being at the other side of the world and closer to even more amazing countries to see and hopefully explore in time, is well worth the upheaval. 

We love the idea of a family adventure. Seeing new things we've only seen in books, learning another countries history and culture, meeting new people... Stepping right out of our comfort zone....and ultimately showing our children the world 🌏 it couldn't be better. 

Only thing I can agree with here is the adventure - that is the one reason why you might think of moving.

Higher salaries (but dont go on straight comparisons, compare as a percentage of the local average salary), yes, but higher living costs too - I shudder at my weekly grocery shop here and for relatively little it seems.  Better climate - for some maybe, and for others not so good - personally I hate the incessant heat, having to get out at 6am so I can walk without burning to a crisp in summer, lurching from air conditioned car to air conditioned mall and back (hopefully this year) to our air conditioned house and a week of hot sweaty nights is wrist slitting territory.  Our houses (Canberra) arent built for the cold either so this winter has been a shock to my system after 8+years in UK - we've gone through over a tonne of wood just to keep warm.  Outdoor lifestyle - lovely if you like mozzies and flies and various other creepy crawlies; I am much less inclined to be outside (in summer especially) than I ever was in UK, no sitting on the grass having picnics that's for sure (no real grass, just couch grass which is most bare skin unfriendly although I think they might have real grass down in Vic and Tas). I know a lot of people on here are beach people but after a while I am of the "seen one beach, seen them all" persuasion - it's all personal choice. Laid back approach - nice joke. Longer working week, fewer vacation days and a CV driven need to climb the greasy pole and meanwhile keep step with the Joneses.  Most families I know are dual income because they cant afford to live on one income (yes, Canberra is expensive).   If you also choose to budget for trips "home" to keep in touch with family, that's one holiday a year gone and a lot of money in the process.  If you have no family left to visit then you are quids in but dont expect people to come out and visit you either - it's expensive, it takes up a big chunk of their holidays and the older you get the less appealing is the 24 hours flying.

Canberra used to do  a lot of social work sponsorship and usually within the first couple of years, 90% of them would have moved on, mostly moving home because of the burn out.  Had a chat with a lot of them and whilst we in the associated fields really loved their approach, the management would clamp down so hard on them that they would give up in despair at not being able to do a proper job.  Hopefully that may have changed by now. Someone even wrote a semi autobiographical novel about her SW experiences here before she headed home, it was very amusing but I suspect it took her a while to recover.

You mentioned living about an hour away from the City - an hour away from the centre of the big cities means you are still in the Big City - the suburbs go on boringly for hours.  You may mean one of the smaller country towns and they generally have a nicer sense of community, but they will generally be some hours from the major capital cities (Canberra is the exception however, we are a nice size and although the suburbs are spreading like cancer they're nowhere like in the Sydney Melbourne league)

WDU is one step removed from H&A I suspect - sugary viewing and bearing little resemblance to the reality. Have the salt pot ready when you watch it.

However, as I said, if you are only in it for the adventure then go for it and to hell with the pennies.

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Hi @Corrina, have been reading this thread with interest and trying to think back to our actual costs when we moved in 2015.  Not that it will help you reduce your costs, but may give you a realistic idea about setting up a home and $$ associated with that.

Roughly we spent $4500 setting up home - ie, pretty much purchasing everything from scratch, apart from sofa, fridge, TV and a spare bed (gifted from family and since replaced with new - apart from the sofa which is on it's way out soon!!).  This was buying nothing more fancy than Ikea - lots of Kmart, Target, Ikea, local Asian shops etc.  Think iron, cutlery, clothes pegs, crockery, cleaning products, vacuum cleaner, washing machine, cooking pots and pans/utensils, kettle, toaster, beds/bedding, dining table/chairs, a few other bits of furniture and so on - all the things you would need to function in your home.  Since then, we've replace some items with better quality, but this is what it was at the time.

We rent, so had to put down a deposit of $3k ish.

Moving costs of:  visa GBP 2k  for application, medical, police checks,  etc /flights $3k ish / Move Cube for shipping of personal items $700 plus possible some extra $$ for actual delivery of the boxes to our door.

So that's well over $10k with nothing special included. We stayed with relatives when we first arrived, didn't buy a car and I was working within a few weeks - so didn't have to fall back on other funds (just as well because we didn't really have any!!).

However you cut it, migrating here isn't cheap, and being here isn't that cheap either - depending on how you live and what choices you make, will vary that of course.

For reference, I'm in Sydney (from London before that, and Oxfordshire before that!).

Edited by vickyplum
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309/100 visa application lodged 28/08/13 | Visa sub-class 309 granted 09/05/14 | Arrived NSW 27/05/15 | 100 (PR) visa application lodged 27/09/15 | PR granted 13/04/16 | Citizenship application lodged 18/06/19 | Citizenship interview invite 02/03/20  22/09/20 | Citizenship interview 27/04/20 14/10/20

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I had a look at how much a skilled visa (subclass 175 as it was then) cost back in 2008 (when I applied). It was $2,100 and that included my wife. I think the same price would have included children but we didn't have any at the time (had to pay for separate subclass 101 after my son was born).  So they've definitely become a lot more expensive over the years.

But obviously the cost of the visa was (and still is despite the price increases) only a small portion of the cost of migrating.

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Chartered Accountant (England & Wales); Registered Tax Agent & Fellow of The Tax Institute (Australia)

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4 hours ago, Corrina said:

Yeah, I get you. But for the same jobs and same pressures, Australia generally offers higher salaries (often doubled), and a much better climate. It appears to have a far more laid back approach to life which, in the UK can sadly be missing... A lot! A more outdoorsy lifestyle is also very appealing...we'd up sticks and move there for this even if the salaries were lower. And the thought of being at the other side of the world and closer to even more amazing countries to see and hopefully explore in time, is well worth the upheaval. 

We love the idea of a family adventure. Seeing new things we've only seen in books, learning another countries history and culture, meeting new people... Stepping right out of our comfort zone....and ultimately showing our children the world 🌏 it couldn't be better. 

They are pretty much the reasons we moved and so far all is good and many of those boxes ticked. In a couple of months we will have been here 14 years., its scary how time flies but we have no regrets . From reading your posts it sounds like you have done your research ,which is good and its even better to hear you have friends who have already made the move so no doubt they can give you a heads up of any pitfalls. Although more expensive at the beginning a PR visa gives you way more 'perks' (for want of a better word) once you have arrived, so with kids id definately be going that over a sponsored visa if you can.

Costs do add up and its normally silly things like a driving licence, some sort of work licence, school charges etc that you sometimes forget to budget for but remember these things are over time, its not like you step off the plane and are hit with a $20k bill. I read you did an online shop which would have given you a good idea of what things costs,just remember to buy when items are on offer (especially at supermarkets) they have different offers each week so you soon get used to buying a little more when its cheaper / half price and storing it, over the year it certainly saves you a few dollars. Coles do Flybys and Woolworths do reward points, i use the reward points to get $10 off my shop every 3 or 4 weeks and 4 cents a litre off fuel whenever i fuel up, again another good saving if calculated across the year. 

 Lots of luck with everything

   Cal x

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If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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7 hours ago, Corrina said:

Hey Quoll. Thanks for your reply and info. Honestly though, I appreciate your advice but if we get there it definitely won't be costing us that much!! 50k? Really, where did you move to, Byron Bay? 😳😅

We held off with it because of our teenager really. We wanted her to finish school, and thought she'd change her mind but in actual fact it's her who's driving us the most to go. We won't have any problems with the kids moving. We've already experienced a huge move in the UK and they seem to have (inherited) a sense of adventure. We could absolutely not Ever leave one of us behind, even for a short time. 

Yeah, I do get that it's probably more costly overall than people assume. But I have researched a lot and have friends over there to ask. I agree, we won't struggle to get jobs in the areas we both work. But it would have been nice to feel like I had 3 to 6 months to make sure the kids are settled first and we get to know the areas a bit before starting work. Or at least one of us!... So so many questions still, and it seems so much more to find out. 

Thanks again. 

I think the £50K is a possibility if you are 6 months + out of work. It can and does take people a while to find work. Not sure what sort of SW you do or what the vacancy rates are in each state but if it looks like you are struggling to find work in the area you want I suspect you’ll do what you’d do here in the uk and take a less than perfect job in order to pay the bills. 😊

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