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Teachers Moving or Living in Australia

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Hi guys, 

Just had a read through this thread. 

 

Just looking for some advice really. 

Im currently doing a masters in SEND 

I have a PGCE primary and worked for 5 years in schools. I will finish my masters in jan and was hoping to be assessed as an SEN teacher. Do I stand a chance at getting the PR visa?

 

thanks 

kat 

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3 hours ago, Frankie123 said:

Hi guys, 

Just had a read through this thread. 

 

Just looking for some advice really. 

Im currently doing a masters in SEND 

I have a PGCE primary and worked for 5 years in schools. I will finish my masters in jan and was hoping to be assessed as an SEN teacher. Do I stand a chance at getting the PR visa?

 

thanks 

kat 

What advice are you seeking? File your application and you will eventually receive a decision just like any other applicant. You always have a "chance"...

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1 minute ago, westwoodwizard said:

What advice are you seeking? File your application and you will eventually receive a decision just like any other applicant. You always have a "chance"...

Well basically it says to be classed as an SEN teacher you need to have 45 days observed teaching in your profession by a uni. I have the required amount during my PGCE but that’s not specialised in SEN, however I’m doing a masters in SEN and I won’t have the ‘observed teaching’ for my SEN degree. 

Unless they will accept my Sen degree, so I’m really unsure. 

Just wondering if anyone has been in the same boat 

 

Thanks

Kat

 

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3 minutes ago, Frankie123 said:

Well basically it says to be classed as an SEN teacher you need to have 45 days observed teaching in your profession by a uni. I have the required amount during my PGCE but that’s not specialised in SEN, however I’m doing a masters in SEN and I won’t have the ‘observed teaching’ for my SEN degree. 

Unless they will accept my Sen degree, so I’m really unsure. 

Just wondering if anyone has been in the same boat 

 

Thanks

Kat

 

Yes indeed the observed teaching requirement is a question mark but I guess the thing is if you have any doubts can't you get those 45 days you need in your current program? If not, then you are back to my initial response which is just apply and hope they accept whatever you do have for observed teaching. 

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The real issue that you face is that to be classed as an SEN teacher you must have the supervised teaching.

It sounds like you already meet the requirements for a primary teacher, however, to apply for a visa and be successfully assessed as an SEN teacher is highly doubtful.

Your Masters is by the sound of it is purely theoretical and without the practical component that is needed.

Edited by Sammy1
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Hi Everyone,

I am Dev 38 yrs, from Navi-Mumbai, India. I work as Sr. Secondary Teacher in leading International School in India, with over 10 years of teaching experience in School and College setups in Bio-Science Streams. I have academic qualifications as M.Sc. (Biotech) and Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) from leading Universities in India.

I wants to pursue Master of Teaching (Secondary) for Feb-July intake as full-time student in Aus or NZ, please advise about eligibility and how to take this further on priority basis. 

Kindly let me know may you need any information further.

Thanks & Regards,

Dev

 

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7 hours ago, Sammy1 said:

The real issue that you face is that to be classed as an SEN teacher you must have the supervised teaching.

It sounds like you already meet the requirements for a primary teacher, however, to apply for a visa and be successfully assessed as an SEN teacher is highly doubtful.

Your Masters is by the sound of it is purely theoretical and without the practical component that is needed.

I just don’t think there is a way of getting this 45 days then :-( 

I’m checking on like PGCE top ups, but I don’t think England do anything like this :-/

blah!! How frustrating

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7 hours ago, Prakash kulkarni said:

Hi Everyone,

I am Dev 38 yrs, from Navi-Mumbai, India. I work as Sr. Secondary Teacher in leading International School in India, with over 10 years of teaching experience in School and College setups in Bio-Science Streams. I have academic qualifications as M.Sc. (Biotech) and Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) from leading Universities in India.

I wants to pursue Master of Teaching (Secondary) for Feb-July intake as full-time student in Aus or NZ, please advise about eligibility and how to take this further on priority basis. 

Kindly let me know may you need any information further.

Thanks & Regards,

Dev

 

Visit the individual websites for each university you are interested. All of the information is posted online for what you need to submit with your application. As far as priority, I guess you better apply soon if you are looking for February 2018 assuming they still accept your application. If not, you apply for the next session. It is not complicated.

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1 hour ago, Frankie123 said:

I just don’t think there is a way of getting this 45 days then :-( 

I’m checking on like PGCE top ups, but I don’t think England do anything like this :-/

blah!! How frustrating

Thanks Sammy and Frankie for your advise. I am stuck up it seems... ):

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Hi! Has anyone on here used their immigration police check for the purpose of registering with Queensland College of Teaching? It mentions needing vulnerable persons check on the police clearance so I’m not sure if the one we had done for our visas will be accepted.
Cheers

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Guest Anna9879

so they are sending invites to 70 points or more? is this correct?

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Hi all, I am asking this question on behalf of my sister in law who would like to go to Australia and work as a teacher. 

She has her teaching degree (3 year) and has completed her NQT year. 

She has since worked in a number of schools doing supply work.

Just a basic question would her qualifications / experience qualify her to teach in Australia and if so what would be the best visa for her to apply for ?

If not is there anything she can do to up skill her qualifications? 

Any help greatly appreciated.  

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1 hour ago, J-J said:

Hi all, I am asking this question on behalf of my sister in law who would like to go to Australia and work as a teacher. 

She has her teaching degree (3 year) and has completed her NQT year. 

She has since worked in a number of schools doing supply work.

Just a basic question would her qualifications / experience qualify her to teach in Australia and if so what would be the best visa for her to apply for ?

If not is there anything she can do to up skill her qualifications? 

Any help greatly appreciated.  

No, she would be ineligible as it stands, you have to have a 4 year degree from a University.  A practical Masters in something specialised (like Special Ed) might fit the bill.  She's a very long way from applying for a visa

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9 minutes ago, Quoll said:

No, she would be ineligible as it stands, you have to have a 4 year degree from a University.  A practical Masters in something specialised (like Special Ed) might fit the bill.  She's a very long way from applying for a visa

 

This is what I thought.

Their intention wasn't to live permanently in Australia, maybe for 4 years or so. 

Are there any other jobs that she could do that these sort or qualifications would qualify her for? 

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Not for 4 years. If she’s under 31 she could apply for a Working Holiday Visa which would give her 1 year plus a second year if she does 3 month’s rural/remote work. She’s not likely to get in on her skills. Teaching is well oversubscribed with loads of unemployed teachers battling for positions so even if she upped her qualifications there’s no guarantee it would still be on the skills list - primary teachers aren’t on many states’ lists and, even then, they’re specialist primary teachers. Secondary Maths/science is more in demand but that’s usually a first degree with either of them plus a PGCE.

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11 hours ago, J-J said:

Their intention wasn't to live permanently in Australia, maybe for 4 years or so. 

Are there any other jobs that she could do that these sort or qualifications would qualify her for? 

There's a TSS visa for three or four years, which is what you may be thinking of. It's basically a temp contract position - an employer has to sponsor you, and you have to leave the country when the job ends.  Unfortunately, I've never heard of even private schools offering such visas to primary teachers.  The employer has to prove they couldn't find anyone locally, and that's unlikely to be the case.

A working holiday visa is her best bet, if she's young enough.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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11 hours ago, Marisawright said:

A working holiday visa is her best bet, if she's young enough.

Yes she is only 25 so i think this is the best option. 

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Hey there I made the move out to Australia to teach in january! 

I already had a visa but I found a job advertised on TES online! At the same time as employing me they also employed some other Brits that didn’t have visas and they sponsored them! 

Mots very rare but does happen! 

Hope this helps 

Christina Ingram 

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Hi guys,

I’ll be completing my pgce this June, after which I’m planning to apply for pr in Australia. I would have 65 points by then. Considering no teachers have been called in the last few months, so I have any chance with 65 points? If not how about going for 190 for nsw, what is the criteria for getting an invite from them? Or is it better to work for a few years before I apply? 

 

Thabk you

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What? What nonsense of a question are you posing? How does "applying" hurt you? If it does not work out, then continue whatever it is logical for you to do maybe work for a few years and re-apply. Dumb question...not even a real question.

1 hour ago, Areyousure said:

Hi guys,

I’ll be completing my pgce this June, after which I’m planning to apply for pr in Australia. I would have 65 points by then. Considering no teachers have been called in the last few months, so I have any chance with 65 points? If not how about going for 190 for nsw, what is the criteria for getting an invite from them? Or is it better to work for a few years before I apply? 

 

Thabk you

 

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27 minutes ago, westwoodwizard said:

What? What nonsense of a question are you posing? How does "applying" hurt you? If it does not work out, then continue whatever it is logical for you to do maybe work for a few years and re-apply. Dumb question...not even a real question.

 

Sorry if my question sounded dumb to you, I asked coz getting everything sorted requires a lot of work and quite a bit of money as well. If chances are gng to be near impossible I might as well, apply a few years later. 

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5 hours ago, Areyousure said:

Sorry if my question sounded dumb to you, I asked coz getting everything sorted requires a lot of work and quite a bit of money as well. If chances are gng to be near impossible I might as well, apply a few years later. 

Okay you got me. Must admit...did not think of the "cost". But, honestly, most people seem so desperate that money seems to be no object so I was thinking more like what do you really risk by applying...but obviously you are keeping track of the invitations...I gave up a few years ago..thinking that spending so much money visa applications just to see rules change again and again...it maybe a beautiful country but whether grass is greener on the other side I have no idea anymore...Also...I apologize for calling the question "dumb". 

Edited by westwoodwizard
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1 hour ago, westwoodwizard said:

Okay you got me. Must admit...did not think of the "cost". But, honestly, most people seem so desperate that money seems to be no object....

...which is something I really struggle to understand.  I can understand people fancying a new adventure - but it 's not a better country, just different, so I wonder why people with families are willing to invest so many thousands of dollars in getting here!

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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6 hours ago, Marisawright said:

...which is something I really struggle to understand.  I can understand people fancying a new adventure - but it 's not a better country, just different, so I wonder why people with families are willing to invest so many thousands of dollars in getting here!

Much of it seems to be the typical migration from South/Southeast Asia and Africa to any major English speaking Western country..i.e.USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the UK where migrants will usually experience an immediate change/improvement in the physical surroundings, infrastructure, environmental quality, etc. and an emotional "upliftment" as they can put pictures on Facebook bragging about their new lives to their friends and family "stuck" back home. So, from that perspective, I guess grass might be greener in some ways at least superficially. As for migration from one Western country to another, I am more hesistant to see the grass being greener because many of the problems are similar such as the econoic challenges facing the USA...countries like Australia lagged a bit behind in experiencing those problems but from what I understand the job market in Australia has also become challenging as employers there want to cut back on their labor costs just like their American counterparts. And socially and culturally speaking, it is not necessarily a smooth transition to move from say the USA or UK to Australia. People who make the move do realize and appreciate many of the good things back home despite some things they may not have always liked and they also realize the costs involved in making that move and disruption to stability did not result in a better life. The reality is that many people think moving will improve their lives or solve their problems and it often does not.

Edited by westwoodwizard
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5 hours ago, westwoodwizard said:

Much of it seems to be the typical migration from South/Southeast Asia and Africa to any major English speaking Western country..i.e.USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the UK where migrants will usually experience an immediate change/improvement in the physical surroundings, infrastructure, environmental quality, etc. and an emotional "upliftment" as they can put pictures on Facebook bragging about their new lives to their friends and family "stuck" back home. So, from that perspective, I guess grass might be greener in some ways at least superficially. As for migration from one Western country to another, I am more hesistant to see the grass being greener because many of the problems are similar such as the econoic challenges facing the USA...countries like Australia lagged a bit behind in experiencing those problems but from what I understand the job market in Australia has also become challenging as employers there want to cut back on their labor costs just like their American counterparts. And socially and culturally speaking, it is not necessarily a smooth transition to move from say the USA or UK to Australia. People who make the move do realize and appreciate many of the good things back home despite some things they may not have always liked and they also realize the costs involved in making that move and disruption to stability did not result in a better life. The reality is that many people think moving will improve their lives or solve their problems and it often does not.

Agree with this. It really does depend on where/what you move from as to what constitutes “better”. 

One of my favourite things someone here in Australia said to me was “the grass is always greener over the septic tank “. A lot of wisdom in those words I think.

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