Jump to content

You're currently viewing the forum as a Guest
register-now-button_orig.png
and join in with discussions   
ask migration questions
message other members

..and much much more!

chilliboy

Who's returned home the quickest!

Recommended Posts

Personally, I think about 3 weeks for one family I met but there is the (probably urban myth) family who never made it into Melbourne CBD but turned around and departed.

No that actually did happen, they got on the next plane home. We had one that booked in to their short term rental and 5 days later they had vanished leaving all their cases behind, the police got involved and it turned out they had also got on a flight home, why they didn't take their belongs I will never know.

We also had a PIO member who found out she had stage 4 cancer after only being here 8 weeks. They went home it was such a sad time for us all but thankfully she beat the cancer.


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I started a thread on this a couple of years ago over on Poms in Adelaide if anyone is interested in reading some of the responses...

 

http://www.pomsinadelaide.com/forum/aussie-chat/40761-shortest-longest-time-australia-before-returning-uk.html

 

That made for interesting reading :cool: Just don't know what people expect when they get here. Hope they are all happily settled back 'home' though.


Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the first 6 months are the hardest. I owned a relocation business in Melbourne and I would say probably 70% of them nearly packed up and went home in that 6 months. I'm now seeing messages from them that they been here 7/8 years and loving it.

I would say 95% of them have stayed.


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's no doubt it all does seem a bit strange when you first arrive but what do people expect? I thought the other different countries I lived in were a bit strange too especially the ones where they spoke a different language.

 

All too many have not or hardly travelled before by the sounds of it. I find Australia perhaps along with NZ probably the easiest country imaginable for British to settle in. Of course there are always those that shouldn't venture away from the familiar and those that won't like it in much the same way while I loved living in London, couldn't really hack Norfolk for more than a week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I've not emigrated I used to laugh at people wanting to return within a few weeks. I thought how do they even go on holiday. However I really struggled on my first week in Australia, it was much harder than I expected. Everything went wrong and I just didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would. so I can see how how the feeling would be completely magnified if if sold my house, uprooted family etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 hr turn around was the shortest time for 1 pilot in Brunei, didn't like the smells in Bandar the capital.

Mind you it could be a bit pongy sometimes, I found it a bit hard to begin with, life in general not the smell. Ended up staying 10 years and still miss it a bit to be honest, amazing what you get used to and learn to enjoy.

 

 

Adding to to the above, I know some people make snap decisions and leave a new country within in weeks/months, can understand it if eg work is impossible to find, but to take against somewhere without giving it a chance seems a shame to me, especially a first world English speaking country. Sad not to give it more of a chance to experience life somewhere different.

 

I arrived in Brunei a Muslim country knowing no one as my husband had started working there.

Spent the first 3 days in a flat provided by the company.

Then moved into a house to house sit for 6 weeks.

There were no European neighbours, only houses on one side of the road, jungle in front and behind.

My husband then had to go away for 10 days.

I only knew the way to the airport and back, with a supermarket on the way.

The house next door was being built, and I was surrounded by foreign workers wearing balaclavas.

Monkeys jumped on the balcony at night.

The dogs barked at anything.

Boy was I nervous and scared, that's an understatement.

The workers never bothered me and I discovered the head wear was to protect them from the sun.

Life got slowly better, I made long life friends, and was sad to leave 10 years later from a country I found alian to start with, it certainly wasn't perfect, life was anything but easy at times,but had become home by the time I left.

Edited by ramot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Although I've not emigrated I used to laugh at people wanting to return within a few weeks. I thought how do they even go on holiday. However I really struggled on my first week in Australia, it was much harder than I expected. Everything went wrong and I just didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would. so I can see how how the feeling would be completely magnified if if sold my house, uprooted family etc

 

I can understand you feeling like that because you'd come to have a holiday - and what's the point of staying on a holiday that you're not enjoying?

 

I struggle to understand people who invest so much in starting a new life and then give it all up just because things go wrong in the first week or two. Of course it's going to be challenging to get set up in a brand new country! What did they expect? It just goes to show how many people emigrate with unrealistic expectations.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can understand you feeling like that because you'd come to have a holiday - and what's the point of staying on a holiday that you're not enjoying?

 

I struggle to understand people who invest so much in starting a new life and then give it all up just because things go wrong in the first week or two. Of course it's going to be challenging to get set up in a brand new country! What did they expect?

 

.................. because some people just want the UK 10,000 miles away from the real thing.


Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some folk didn't know their bread was already buttered in UK.

 

Some work it out within weeks of getting there and know turning round fast can sometimes be the best option

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Some folk didn't know their bread was already buttered in UK.

 

Some work it out within weeks of getting there and know turning round fast can sometimes be the best option

 

Like I said, unrealistic expectations.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Some folk didn't know their bread was already buttered in UK.

 

Some work it out within weeks of getting there and know turning round fast can sometimes be the best option

 

My metaphorical UK bread has only ultra light supermarket own brand margarine!!


Partner Visa 309/100 Applied for - 23/6/15CO assigned (WP) 1/9/15Medical Completed 29/12/15Police Check uploaded 12/01/16GRANTED 21/01/16!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My metaphorical UK bread has only ultra light supermarket own brand margarine!!

 

Ah but that's the point! No one migrates to Australia thinking it's going to be worse than the UK, but sometimes they have rose tinted glasses on.

 

They may THINK their British bread is buttered with light own brand marg, but when they get to Australia, they realise it was actually M&S Farmhouse Butter.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ah but that's the point! No one migrates to Australia thinking it's going to be worse than the UK, but sometimes they have rose tinted glasses on.

 

They may THINK their British bread is buttered with light own brand marg, but when they get to Australia, they realise it was actually M&S Farmhouse Butter.

 

I was just making a joke Marisa. Calm down!


Partner Visa 309/100 Applied for - 23/6/15CO assigned (WP) 1/9/15Medical Completed 29/12/15Police Check uploaded 12/01/16GRANTED 21/01/16!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was just making a joke Marisa. Calm down!

 

So was I


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Although I've not emigrated I used to laugh at people wanting to return within a few weeks. I thought how do they even go on holiday. However I really struggled on my first week in Australia, it was much harder than I expected. Everything went wrong and I just didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would. so I can see how how the feeling would be completely magnified if if sold my house, uprooted family etc

 

But i think your point shows how we differ, as personally we believed selling up in the UK would give you that bit more umph to stick things out when things got tough at the start, to us having somewhere to run back too so easily could give you the option to bail at the first hurdle and make a mistake (such as moving back so soon) you live to regret.

IMO Anyone who thinks they can move here and pick up where they left off in the UK will come unstuck, as i have always said its similar to starting adult life all over again, you start at the bottom and work up, those not prepared to take a step back whilst they get established tend to be the ones who return early on from what i have seen and read.

 

Cal x


If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

those not prepared to take a step back whilst they get established tend to be the ones who return early

 

 

 

That's pretty spot on.

 

Sometimes its more than a step back for some, sometimes its falling to the bottom of the heap and putting up with many tedious and painful years of trying to "prove yourself" all over again after having earned yourself a track record, respect and a name in your field early on in your career back in the UK.

 

To find yourself rolling your career back 10 years working with yesterdays technology alongside lower educated backward lazy insular people can be tiresome to say the least.

 

Some folk are smart enough to get out fast because they only realise then just how good they had it back home.

 

Then again, someone who came from a very mediocre job with no promotion or career path and then getting another mediocre dead end job in Australia would be happy as the proverbial pig. from a life of debt and struggling in UK to another life of debt and struggling elsewhere is hardly progress.

 

Just an illusion of a "step up in lifestyle" which many buy into and feel they "made it" because of a bigger house and living close to a beach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's pretty spot on.

 

Sometimes its more than a step back for some, sometimes its falling to the bottom of the heap and putting up with many tedious and painful years of trying to "prove yourself" all over again after having earned yourself a track record, respect and a name in your field early on in your career back in the UK.

 

To find yourself rolling your career back 10 years working with yesterdays technology alongside lower educated backward lazy insular people can be tiresome to say the least.

 

Some folk are smart enough to get out fast because they only realise then just how good they had it back home.

 

Then again, someone who came from a very mediocre job with no promotion or career path and then getting another mediocre dead end job in Australia would be happy as the proverbial pig. from a life of debt and struggling in UK to another life of debt and struggling elsewhere is hardly progress.

 

Just an illusion of a "step up in lifestyle" which many buy into and feel they "made it" because of a bigger house and living close to a beach.

 

You sound very bitter. So all migrants enjoying life in Aus are deluded are they just because it didn't work for you?


Partner Visa 309/100 Applied for - 23/6/15CO assigned (WP) 1/9/15Medical Completed 29/12/15Police Check uploaded 12/01/16GRANTED 21/01/16!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You sound very bitter. So all migrants enjoying life in Aus are deluded are they just because it didn't work for you?

I would imagine it didn't work for him because of his attitude I think if you keep an open mind things either slot into place or they don't

my hubby was a bricklayer and when asked at the interview at Oz house what he would do if he couldn't find work in his trade he said I will sweep the streets if I have to Bloke interviewing laughed and said That's what I like to hear and rubber stamped us there and then

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So all migrants enjoying life in Aus are deluded are they just because it didn't work for you?

 

Right now with a somewhat "fragile" global situation, a fast shrinking Australian economy and strong possibility of a big global stock market downturn, its not a very clever time to be upping sticks and throwing caution to the wind.

 

But hey if none of that matters and you're still determined to live the "surfy beach lifestyle" then go for it.

 

You can always "suck it up for a few years until you get established" like you say.

 

Sounds like you've been watching too much "Wanted Down Under".

 

I was a new sun seeker, I would wait for the panic & fear to set in on the housing market over the next few years first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's pretty spot on.

 

Sometimes its more than a step back for some, sometimes its falling to the bottom of the heap and putting up with many tedious and painful years of trying to "prove yourself" all over again after having earned yourself a track record, respect and a name in your field early on in your career back in the UK.

 

To find yourself rolling your career back 10 years working with yesterdays technology alongside lower educated backward lazy insular people can be tiresome to say the least.

 

Some folk are smart enough to get out fast because they only realise then just how good they had it back home.

 

Then again, someone who came from a very mediocre job with no promotion or career path and then getting another mediocre dead end job in Australia would be happy as the proverbial pig. from a life of debt and struggling in UK to another life of debt and struggling elsewhere is hardly progress.

 

Just an illusion of a "step up in lifestyle" which many buy into and feel they "made it" because of a bigger house and living close to a beach.

 

 

In my experience migrants who excel in their chosen field and demonstrate adaptability are normally recognised and rewarded fairly quickly. Any backwards steps are normally of short duration. Sadly not all migrants are as good in their field as they think they are.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would imagine it didn't work for him because of his attitude I think if you keep an open mind things either slot into place or they don't

my hubby was a bricklayer and when asked at the interview at Oz house what he would do if he couldn't find work in his trade he said I will sweep the streets if I have to Bloke interviewing laughed and said That's what I like to hear and rubber stamped us there and then

 

It didn't work out and I am bitter - you couldn't be farther from the truth.

 

Of course they rubber stamped you when you told them you would sweep the streets.

 

They're trying hard to boost their population and import more tax payers, what did you expect.

Edited by johngdownunder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Right now with a somewhat "fragile" global situation, a fast shrinking Australian economy and strong possibility of a big global stock market downturn, its not a very clever time to be upping sticks and throwing caution to the wind.

 

But hey if none of that matters and you're still determined to live the "surfy beach lifestyle" then go for it.

 

You can always "suck it up for a few years until you get established" like you say.

 

Sounds like you've been watching too much "Wanted Down Under".

 

I was a new sun seeker, I would wait for the panic & fear to set in on the housing market over the next few years first.

 

Bound4Tassie has lived in Australia before. She is married to an Australian. She probably has no interest in the "surfy beach lifestyle". She and her family are moving to Tasmania. Her husband's family live here.

 

You really have a bad attitude.

Edited by JockinTas

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoops, we seem to be going off topic.

 

A family at my children's school 'emigrated' to Oz last July with 4 children. Had the big leaving party etc. The kids were back in school for the start of the Sept new term! I thought my son was making it up when he said Joseph was back in class.

 

The family didn't even wait for the container to arrive....the just instructed it to be sent straight back to the UK..... so came back to an empty house and had to wait 6 weeks for their stuff to arrive back. Nowt as queer as folk!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×