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Hi all!.

As many of you know we as a family are moving from the UK to the Brisbane area in April, or that should say "possibly". We have our residencey visas and all is in place. The one thing that is really starting to concern us is the lack of rental properties in the Brisbane area. We aren't looking to be in the city, more of a 30/40 minute drive sort of area.

I've contacted 6 real estate agents without reply which,I guess is to be expected when they don't need your custom due to more demand than properties available.

What I'd love to get some advice on what is the best way to go about securing something until we can buy.or anything you can think of that might be a help to us

We are a relatively young,hard working,family(40's with 2 daughters 16+12,plus 2 very well behaved dogs.)

It's getting to the stage that we are actually considering calling it all off as it is a bit of a worry.

Thanks I'm advance👍

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33 minutes ago, Simontucks said:

Hi all!.

As many of you know we as a family are moving from the UK to the Brisbane area in April...

I've contacted 6 real estate agents without reply

I don't know how it works in your part of the UK, but in Australia you can't just contact a real estate agent and say, "show me what you've got".  You need to search online, find out if they've got something you think might be suitable, then contact them to request an inspection of that specific property or properties.   In Australia, that means searching on domain.com.au or realestate.com.au.

However if you're not able to inspect the property (which you obviously can't, since you're not in Australia), then there's no point contacting them. They won't lease anything to you without an inspection.  In some states, it's actually illegal to do so. 

If you have family in Brisbane who can do the inspection for you, that would be one solution. But obviously you'll need to trust them to make the decision.  Otherwise, do what most migrants do:  book a AirBnB or a holiday let for your first 4-6 weeks and start looking for a 6-month rental as soon as you arrive.

 

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Hi Simon 

Things we are doing to try and get a place: 

Making a PDF rental CV of who we are, with our background, qualifications, pictures of our home in the UK (inside and out), how long we intend to stay, level of savings, weekly rental budget, references (including an Australian reference and guarantor). 

Check out local Facebook and network pages for anyone potentially breaking lease. 

Be prepared to potentially offer more rent than advertised or bigger bond or both and /or 3-6 months rent up front. No messing around. 

I know your brother is on the ground there which is a massive advantage - get him asking around on your behalf - I think in QLD it’s very much who you know not what you know. 

Be consistent and persistent with agents - they may not be responding to you because you are not yet on the ground and maybe don’t have proof of travel or a job there yet. Once you are there go round agents in person, hand in your rental CV and introduce yourself and check in with them regularly. 

The rental crisis is a concern but let’s face it you’re at a really big advantage already having family there. This move is huge and is not going to be without challenges - you cannot fall at the first hurdle. Come on, big boy pants on! 

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7 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

I don't know how it works in your part of the UK, but in Australia you can't just contact a real estate agent and say, "show me what you've got".  You need to search online, find out if they've got something you think might be suitable, then contact them to request an inspection of that specific property or properties.   In Australia, that means searching on domain.com.au or realestate.com.au.

However if you're not able to inspect the property (which you obviously can't, since you're not in Australia), then there's no point contacting them. They won't lease anything to you without an inspection.  In some states, it's actually illegal to do so. 

If you have family in Brisbane who can do the inspection for you, that would be one solution. But obviously you'll need to trust them to make the decision.  Otherwise, do what most migrants do:  book a AirBnB or a holiday let for your first 4-6 weeks and start looking for a 6-month rental as soon as you arrive.

 

Hi

I haven't asked the people I've contacted to "show me what you've got".....I have actually asked them for any advice they might have to help us in the search for a property 👍

Thanks for the reply

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10 minutes ago, Cheery Thistle said:

Hi Simon 

Things we are doing to try and get a place: 

Making a PDF rental CV of who we are, with our background, qualifications, pictures of our home in the UK (inside and out), how long we intend to stay, level of savings, weekly rental budget, references (including an Australian reference and guarantor). 

Check out local Facebook and network pages for anyone potentially breaking lease. 

Be prepared to potentially offer more rent than advertised or bigger bond or both and /or 3-6 months rent up front. No messing around. 

I know your brother is on the ground there which is a massive advantage - get him asking around on your behalf - I think in QLD it’s very much who you know not what you know. 

Be consistent and persistent with agents - they may not be responding to you because you are not yet on the ground and maybe don’t have proof of travel or a job there yet. Once you are there go round agents in person, hand in your rental CV and introduce yourself and check in with them regularly. 

The rental crisis is a concern but let’s face it you’re at a really big advantage already having family there. This move is huge and is not going to be without challenges - you cannot fall at the first hurdle. Come on, big boy pants on! 

Hey you!!

Thanks so much for that,and the talking to👍👍.Great ideas there as always, you're a star!

Simon

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22 minutes ago, Simontucks said:

Hi all!.

As many of you know we as a family are moving from the UK to the Brisbane area in April, or that should say "possibly". We have our residencey visas and all is in place. The one thing that is really starting to concern us is the lack of rental properties in the Brisbane area. We aren't looking to be in the city, more of a 30/40 minute drive sort of area.

I've contacted 6 real estate agents without reply which,I guess is to be expected when they don't need your custom due to more demand than properties available.

What I'd love to get some advice on what is the best way to go about securing something until we can buy.or anything you can think of that might be a help to us

We are a relatively young,hard working,family(40's with 2 daughters 16+12,plus 2 very well behaved dogs.)

It's getting to the stage that we are actually considering calling it all off as it is a bit of a worry.

Thanks I'm advance👍

You can do that, but I bet you'll regret not giving Australia a chance for the rest of your days. You've got this far and that's a real achievement in itself. Yes, it will be a struggle at first, but that's the challenge every expat faces while they're adjusting to life in a new country. Just get ready to grasp the nettle!

No estate agent is going to be interested in some random guy on the other side of the world, but once you're here it'll be a different story. Turn up for viewings looking smart and enthusiastic with your paperwork in order, and you'll have no problem finding somewhere to live. I recall your brother lives in Brisbane so you'll have a roof over your head when you arrive. You've got a much better support network in place than most people have when they land on these shores, which will give you chance to find your feet.

And if worst comes to worst and you can always head back to Blighty, but at least you'll know that you gave it your best shot.

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Australian Citizen since 2007 | Returned to the UK between 2008-2011 | QLD resident for over 20 years

All advice and opinions I provide on PomsInOz are solely my own and are general in nature. I am not a migration agent, accountant, tax expert or financial adviser, and my insights are no substitute for professional advice. I strongly encourage you to seek the guidance of qualified professionals for specific concerns. I do not assume any responsibility for actions taken based on the information provided in any of my posts, and if you choose to act on this information then you do so entirely at your own risk.

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30 minutes ago, Cheery Thistle said:

Come on, big boy pants on! 

❤️

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Australian Citizen since 2007 | Returned to the UK between 2008-2011 | QLD resident for over 20 years

All advice and opinions I provide on PomsInOz are solely my own and are general in nature. I am not a migration agent, accountant, tax expert or financial adviser, and my insights are no substitute for professional advice. I strongly encourage you to seek the guidance of qualified professionals for specific concerns. I do not assume any responsibility for actions taken based on the information provided in any of my posts, and if you choose to act on this information then you do so entirely at your own risk.

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12 minutes ago, InnerVoice said:

You can do that, but I bet you'll regret not giving Australia a chance for the rest of your days. You've got this far and that's a real achievement in itself. Yes, it will be a struggle at first, but that's the challenge every expat faces while they're adjusting to life in a new country. Just get ready to grasp the nettle!

No estate agent is going to be interested in some random guy on the other side of the world, but once you're here it'll be a different story. Turn up for viewings looking smart and enthusiastic with your paperwork in order, and you'll have no problem finding somewhere to live. I recall your brother lives in Brisbane so you'll have a roof over your head when you arrive. You've got a much better support network in place than most people have when they land on these shores, which will give you chance to find your feet.

And if worst comes to worst and you can always head back to Blighty, but at least you'll know that you gave it your best shot.

Thanks so much for yet another great reply to my questions!.

 

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56 minutes ago, Simontucks said:

I haven't asked the people I've contacted to "show me what you've got".....I have actually asked them for any advice they might have to help us in the search for a property 👍

But that's even less likely to get a reply.  Real estate agents work for the landlord, not for the renter.  They don't see it as their job to help you, I'm afraid.  I wouldn't expect to get any advice out of them myself, and I'm in Australia. Cheery and InnerVoice have given you good advice.  Best of luck. 

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3 hours ago, Simontucks said:

Hi

I haven't asked the people I've contacted to "show me what you've got".....I have actually asked them for any advice they might have to help us in the search for a property 👍

Thanks for the reply

TBH, thats not going to yield much either.  Brisbane rental agent have prospective renters queuing up down the street to take places at present and don't need to put any work into helping them (not that they usually do even under calmer circumstances).

They just want people to say that they are interested in a specific property and show they meet the requirements, job done. There will be the odd one out there prepared to put in some effort to help you but they will be very hard to find. The onus is totally on you to manage your search these days, they have an easy life.

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Many agents put rental application forms online.  Make sure you can fill all the required information, taking note of the ID required. We added extra information including info about the sale of our UK home, with pictures, and the fact we were new to the country etc.

Get the local ID sorted ASAP like driving licence and Medicare cards, Aus bank account, references etc.  

Go armed with application completed, engage the agent and leave the info with them in case anything else comes up.

Expect to kiss a lot of frogs….there is a reason they want you to inspect….some pictures can be very misleading and years old!

It may be harder with dogs as you will need a secure yard, and not all landlords really want pets.

Good luck, and keep positive 

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So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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Be prepared to potentially offer more rent than advertised or bigger bond or both and /or 3-6 months rent up front. No messing around. 

 

This actually not permitted in some states, (Victoria)Rent bidding is already illegal in QLD and they are about to introduce legislation to stop the above practice as well. 

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1 hour ago, rammygirl said:

Many agents put rental application forms online.  Make sure you can fill all the required information, taking note of the ID required. We added extra information including info about the sale of our UK home, with pictures, and the fact we were new to the country etc.

Good point. Many of the them used something called 1form, but that is now called Ignite. @Simontucks you could create an account on there and start adding your details, so there's one job less to do later.

https://ignite.realestate.com.au/rent/rental-applications

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Australian Citizen since 2007 | Returned to the UK between 2008-2011 | QLD resident for over 20 years

All advice and opinions I provide on PomsInOz are solely my own and are general in nature. I am not a migration agent, accountant, tax expert or financial adviser, and my insights are no substitute for professional advice. I strongly encourage you to seek the guidance of qualified professionals for specific concerns. I do not assume any responsibility for actions taken based on the information provided in any of my posts, and if you choose to act on this information then you do so entirely at your own risk.

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I've been a landlord for many years, what does make the difference is the agent's impression of the potential tenant after all, as it's been said the agent is working for the landlord, well yes, because I'm paying them to.  After an inspection and applications are in, the agent will collate the potential tenants, tell me about the rental record (if applicable) so any black marks etc, or they'll tell me that you're new to the market because you're just in the country.  Then they'll tell me about whether you can pay based on your potential employment or whether they think the rent will be a stretch for them.  And lastly they'll give their impressions of you which they gain by talking to you. 

The best thing you can do based on my 20-odd years of selecting tenants by this process, is, be personable, polite and show keenness with the agent; emphasise things like how much you love to garden (god, I love a tenant who looks after the garden), and if you've previously owned make the impression that you'll look after a place like your own.  The agent is my eyes and ears so talk to them like you would to me as the landlord and it puts you in good stead.

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30 minutes ago, shaunfreo said:

Be prepared to potentially offer more rent than advertised or bigger bond or both and /or 3-6 months rent up front. No messing around. 

 

This actually not permitted in some states, (Victoria)Rent bidding is already illegal in QLD and they are about to introduce legislation to stop the above practice as well. 

Legal or not it’s definitely still happening. 
 

I did see in the headlines earlier (when I was reading about the 70 year old lady who was stabbed in the car park in Brisbane for her car by a 16 year old) that they are making it illegal, but at the moment it looks still to be allowed to offer to pay more. Since the OP is concerned enough to potentially not move due to this issue, it’s a tactic he may consider as part of a bigger picture.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Eera said:

I've been a landlord for many years, what does make the difference is the agent's impression of the potential tenant after all, as it's been said the agent is working for the landlord, well yes, because I'm paying them to.  After an inspection and applications are in, the agent will collate the potential tenants, tell me about the rental record (if applicable) so any black marks etc, or they'll tell me that you're new to the market because you're just in the country.  Then they'll tell me about whether you can pay based on your potential employment or whether they think the rent will be a stretch for them.  And lastly they'll give their impressions of you which they gain by talking to you. 

The best thing you can do based on my 20-odd years of selecting tenants by this process, is, be personable, polite and show keenness with the agent; emphasise things like how much you love to garden (god, I love a tenant who looks after the garden), and if you've previously owned make the impression that you'll look after a place like your own.  The agent is my eyes and ears so talk to them like you would to me as the landlord and it puts you in good stead.

Well the very best thing to do is buy and never rent ever again.

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20 minutes ago, can1983 said:

Well the very best thing to do is buy and never rent ever again.

Not relevant to the OP who will need to rent something when they first arrive in Australia.

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Just now, Marisawright said:

Not relevant to the OP who will need to rent something when they first arrive in Australia.

Could be. I know of several people who brought 3 or 4 bed one bathroom houses in Hobart within 2 weeks of arriving whilst in a 6 week short stay place to avoid the stress of renting and the ongoing hastle of being a tenant. Yes its not going to be a 'forever home' at that short notice but one recently sold for a significant profit 3 years later (of course that was a lucky market)

My point is perhaps if the OP is not fussy buying could be an option

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37 minutes ago, can1983 said:

Could be. I know of several people who brought 3 or 4 bed one bathroom houses in Hobart within 2 weeks of arriving whilst in a 6 week short stay place to avoid the stress of renting and the ongoing hastle of being a tenant. Yes its not going to be a 'forever home' at that short notice but one recently sold for a significant profit 3 years later (of course that was a lucky market)

My point is perhaps if the OP is not fussy buying could be an option

Exactly right, but there's no guarantee that property prices are going to keep increasing at current rates. To buy and then sell a $1m home in QLD it will cost $30k in stamp duty on the way in, and about the same in agent fees on the way out. Add to that legal fees, mortgage registration and transfer fees, moving costs, possibly LMI, and you aren't going to have much change out of $70-80k. That kind of money would pay the rent for two years.

Renting for 6-12 months makes more sense because people will get to know their local area and hopefully be settled in their jobs, so they'll be in a much better position to make an informed buying decision. And if they decided in those first few months that Australia really isn't for them, then it's much easier and cheaper to do a U-turn from rented accommodation.

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Australian Citizen since 2007 | Returned to the UK between 2008-2011 | QLD resident for over 20 years

All advice and opinions I provide on PomsInOz are solely my own and are general in nature. I am not a migration agent, accountant, tax expert or financial adviser, and my insights are no substitute for professional advice. I strongly encourage you to seek the guidance of qualified professionals for specific concerns. I do not assume any responsibility for actions taken based on the information provided in any of my posts, and if you choose to act on this information then you do so entirely at your own risk.

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43 minutes ago, InnerVoice said:

Exactly right, but there's no guarantee that property prices are going to keep increasing at current rates. To buy and then sell a $1m home in QLD it will cost $30k in stamp duty on the way in, and about the same in agent fees on the way out. Add to that legal fees, mortgage registration and transfer fees, moving costs, possibly LMI, and you aren't going to have much change out of $70-80k. That kind of money would pay the rent for two years.

Renting for 6-12 months makes more sense because people will get to know their local area and hopefully be settled in their jobs, so they'll be in a much better position to make an informed buying decision. And if they decided in those first few months that Australia really isn't for them, then it's much easier and cheaper to do a U-turn from rented accommodation.

if you can rent for 2 years in the area you want. If you are forced to live in another suburb because you cant get a rental you aren't going to learn much!

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Worth noting when you do find somewhere you want, some higher demand schools may require a 12 month lease to allow a child to be enrolled , to avoid people renting a second house to get in.  We had to lease a furnished house for 12 months when it only suited us for 6 and then store most of our stuff for the second 6 months.  Worth checking before you sign for 6 months.

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26 minutes ago, Jon the Hat said:

Worth noting when you do find somewhere you want, some higher demand schools may require a 12 month lease to allow a child to be enrolled , to avoid people renting a second house to get in.  We had to lease a furnished house for 12 months when it only suited us for 6 and then store most of our stuff for the second 6 months.  Worth checking before you sign for 6 months.

That's got me researching. I was going to call b***shit but you are completely right in Brisbane they actually have this situation going on

https://www.templetonproperty.com.au/how-to-investigate-school-catchments-in-brisbane/

If I had to live like that id leave what a joke

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Yeah I’ve read that about the schools, the school situation in Brisbane seems a bit extreme to be honest, people literally reserving school spaces for foetuses! 
Absolutely no chance I’d buy upon getting off the boat, the more I’m reading about petty crime, car thefts and break-ins, the more wary I’m becoming. To be honest I wouldn’t buy in the UK without knowing the area a bit myself so it’s not happening 10k miles away! 

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Thank you so much for all the replies!. So much to consider and lots to take into account!.it is a worry but we knew it wasn't going to be easy.

I like the idea of some sort of portfolio to show the agents/owners,this wouldn't be a problem and I'm pretty sure we would be able to put together an impressive one!.

I'm going to jump all over the school situation today as we do have a couple of first choices so need to find out the process of getting child 2 enrolled.

With regards to buying obviously we would love to buy asap, We have already looked at possible mortgage options and know we can get one pretty quickly but,it's a big risk as has been stated regarding finding an area we like first before settling.

As Cheery has stated the increase in crime in the area is a slight concern. I can see the way the UK is going and am surprised how bad it's getting in Queensland. I suppose it's a city,with lots of people relocating there,not all are going to be decent folk.

On the real estate agent front,I had to replies yesterday and both seem very keen to help with phone calls planned for today!.will keep you posted

Thank yet again for all the replies guys!.great bunch 👍👍

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