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InnerVoice

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InnerVoice last won the day on January 22

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About InnerVoice

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    Australian Citizen
  • Birthday March 7

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  1. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    We've only booked our first two nights' accommodation so far and that's in central Launceston, so we're looking forward to checking the place out and exploring a little. I think if we decided to move from Queensland to Tasmania we might find the Launceston climate a little more appealing, so it will be good to see it first, before being dazzled by Hobart.
  2. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    That looks stunning. I definitely didn't go there the first time I visited Tassie or I'd have remembered 'The Nut'!
  3. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    Cataract Gorge definitely on the list. Yes, I remember the Beaconsfield Mine rescue. 2006 - wow, it only seems like yesterday!
  4. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    Thank you - that looks like a nice place to visit on our first day, as we're spending the first two nights in Launceston.
  5. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    Just googled 'Marrawah' and some nearby places to visit popped up, one of which was the Allandale Gardens. It appears to be permanently closed now, which is a shame as we do love looking around a nice garden - you know a proper one, with roses and stuff
  6. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    I'm not a regular visitor to this forum and when I post it's usually to ask the advice of the PIO community, who I've always found very helpful and knowledgeable. In this case it's about the suitability of Tasmania as a retirement destination, and recommendations for places to visit whilst on holiday. In no way do I wish to discourage people from commenting, but if someone has never visited Tasmania then it's unlikely they'll have much to contribute to this thread. When moving to a new location there are lots of factors to consider; climate, cost of living, and proximity to amenities, to name just a few. Given that we live in Cairns, we also considered the possibility of natural disasters like flooding and cyclones when we bought our current home. In addition, we could have considered the possibility of war, earthquakes, or our neighbour turning out to be Walter White. Yes, they're all possibilities, but not ones worth losing too much sleep over. Based on your comments I gather you've had a negative experience at some point which I'm sorry to hear, but that doesn't give you the right to hijack other people's posts and make them all about this issue. If Australia's suburban drug culture is a major concern for you, then you might consider writing a separate post on the matter.
  7. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    That sounds a bit too hardcore for us! We're just going to have a go at the one-day circuit from Dove Lake Car Park... https://www.trailhiking.com.au/hikes/cradle-mountain-summit/#:~:text=Cradle Mountain Summit is a,Grade%3A 4
  8. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    Ohhh that's absolutely bonkers!
  9. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    I totally agree in terms of the property itself, although I wouldn't only consider buying a house in a flat location when I was 60 because I was concerned about whether or not I could walk to the shops when I was 80-85, unless my mobility was already an issue. That doesn't mean to say I'd buy a house on the side of Mt Everest, but I wouldn't be put off by the fact that the area was 'a bit hilly'. We live in a 4 bedroom 2 bathroom property and we already find it too big for the two of us (something always needs fixing), so we'll definitely be downsizing to 2 or 3 bedrooms. Personally I'd be up for over-50s retirement living but my wife is a fair bit younger than me, and says she isn't quite ready for that yet!
  10. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    Oh dear. That doesn't put me off, but my wife has a morbid fear of snakes! We'll not leave too early, so hopefully other people will have disturbed them by then
  11. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    What a great photo - this is what we've been dreaming of! We're hoping to do the Cradle Mountain walk while we're over, although we know we'll be very lucky to get weather like that.
  12. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    @Marisawright thanks for getting it back on topic We have some impressive mountains around Cairns. Walsh's Pyramid is almost as high as Sca Fell, with fabulous views from the summit - and then there's Mount Baldy and Bartle Frere (over 1600m). That said, they're not the same as 'real mountains' - you know the ones with trees at the bottom, rocks in the middle, and (sometimes) snow on the top. I've missed seeing those diverse landscapes. especially as we haven't been out of Queensland for nearly 4 years now. My biggest concern about moving to Tassie is how we'd handle the winter, given that we've have been in the tropics for over a decade. I think I might have gone a bit soft in our old age! Personally I wouldn't make a decision about my retirement years based on what my needs might theoretically be in the last 3-5 years, and that's assuming we suffered a significant decline in health prior to death (and didn't just fall off the perch, as many do). Free public transport once you reach retirement age is great, but for us fare-paying passengers we've found that for short journeys, Uber isn't much more expensive than two bus fares - and a lot more comfortable too.
  13. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    If you find the position of people's curtains or the contents of their washing lines sufficiently engaging, I imagine you'll find plenty in Hobart to maintain your curiosity! Perhaps take a visit there and experience it first-hand - that's what we intend to do.
  14. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    @Blue Flu according to the statistics below (courtesy of Numbeo), Perth has a relatively low crime rate, so you either live in a very bad area (sorry), or you have a misconception of the place.
  15. InnerVoice

    Retiring in Tasmania

    In the UK, it's likely that if you live on a council estate you'll encounter more antisocial behaviour than if you live in a residential area with a high level of owner-occupancy. That doesn't mean to say that everyone who lives on a council estate is riff-raff, or that everyone who owns their home is nice. My parents lived in their last home for nearly 40 years, which was on the boundary of an estate owned by Lord & Lady Something-or-other. When they moved there back in the seventies, they had a lovely uninterrupted view of the countryside that went on for miles. Several years later, Lord Something upgraded to a new Lady Something, who turned out to be a right nasty piece of work. She was horrible to people who lived in the village – many of whom worked on the estate – and also planted an assortment of fast-growing trees along the perimeter of the estate, 'for her privacy'. Over 10-15 years they completely eclipsed any view my parents had, as well as most of the light from their garden too. In the end they had a costly legal battle to get her to cut them back as they could prove a historic right to light, but even then the views/light were nothing like they were before. What struck me about the whole incident was how someone who was very well off and with a high standard of education, could be quite so self-centred. After 25 years here I've found that you can't really make generalisations about Australians either. If you live next to a large family with young children and dogs, you can probably expect more noise than from an elderly couple, but that doesn't automatically make them the neighbours from hell. It's about whether there is consideration shown to others. We lived for a couple of years in Paddington, which is now one of the most upmarket suburbs in Brisbane, but one of our neighbours a few doors down had parties going on to unearthly hours almost every weekend. Myself and another neighbour left polite notes on a couple of occasions which didn't work, so the next time it happened I called the police. Guess what, a few days later I came home from work to find one of our windows had been smashed! When I'm interested in buying (or even renting) a property these days I always visit the area a couple of times on Friday and Saturday evenings, to check the noise levels. I also ask the next-door neighbours if there are any known flood issues in the area, or other problems with the property they might know about, which allows also gives me an excuse to suss them out too. While this won't guarantee that I'll never have to deal with anti-social behaviour, at least I'll have taken some precautions.
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