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The Pom Queen

Where to retire in Australia

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The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) recently published population estimates by age and sex which provides a timely opportunity to look at the housing market performance of those council area’s nationally which are most popular with over 65’s.

Queenscliffe in Victoria was the council region that had the highest proportion of residents aged over 65 years of age at the end of June 2016.  Although Queenscliffe has relatively few residents overall (2,904), 40.3% of the council area’s residents were at least 65 years old. 

The accompanying list highlights the 50 council areas nationally with the highest proportion of residents aged at least 65 years of age.  What is immediately noticeable is that not one of these 50 council areas is located within a capital city.  In fact, if you list all councils nationally by their proportion of residents aged at least 65, the first capital city area listed is Holdfast Bay in Adelaide with 23.1% of its residents at least 65 years old. Council areas within New South Wales and South Australia also dominate the list with each of these states having 13 entries on the list.

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A further feature of the list is that these retiree-centric council areas tend to have significantly lower median house values than the individual state capital city housing markets.  This may be due to retirees moving to areas where housing is more affordable in order to free-up capital for them to enjoy their retirement, it could also be out of necessity due to the high cost of housing within most capital cities.  The locations are also likely to be linked to lifestyle preferences, with a large number of the top council areas located in regional coastal areas.

Looking at the value growth performance for houses across these top 50 regions, the data shows that generally the rate of growth has been lower than that of the larger capital cities.  31 of the 50 council areas listed have seen house values rise over the past year. 

The small council area of Quairading in Western Australia’s Wheat Belt region has seen the greatest growth over the year (+21.5%) followed by Shoalhaven in New South Wales (+15.3%).  Of those council areas that have recorded house value falls over the past year, the greatest falls have been recorded in Mount Remarkable in South Australia (-7.1%) and Flinders in Tasmania (-5.2%).


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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Ball Bay, Qld is a quiet place; plenty of fishing time...:P

Cheers, Bobj.

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It is important to note that just because there is a high % of retirees living in an area, it does not necessarily mean that the area is ‘popular’ with retirees.

Not is it true that people have moved to retire there.  Sometimes it is, but it's important not to assume that all areas are 'popular'...just because there is a high concentration of over 65's.

It’s true that various locations around Australia may  attract retirees looking to get in on the action but it is also true that many locations around Australia are not attracting new comers, and younger people, to the area. 

People are ageing in place.

‘Ten’ Over 65
*Queenscliffe, VIC        40.3%  over 65
*Victor Harbor  SA        37.7%
Barunga West, S.A.      32.9%
Yorke Peninsula            31.3%
Eurobodalla                    29.4%
Mid North Coast NSW  29.0%
Tasman TAS                   28.8%
Quairading W.A.             28.6%.   Population  641:  (2016 Census)
Yankalilla  SA                  27.9%. |
Tumby Bay   SA               27.8%

*NOTE: Have been consistently high % of people over 65 over the various Census.

Read Carefully And Do The Research
Having visited over 200 locations around Australia, in researching for Where To Retire In Australia, there are various questions that need to be asked if you are thinking of moving,

Before resisting the temptation to move to an area in your retirement it’s worthwhile doing the research.

Why is there such a high % over 65?
-is it because younger people are not moving to those areas?  ie: they may also be moving away from these places.
-is it because people are actually moving to the area in their retirement?

Facilities: 
What are the facilities?
Is there a strain on facilities?
eg: medical

Are there a lack of facilities?
-e.g.:  Police, Neighbourhood Watch
Council services for older people?
Transport:  type?, services?
What’s the communication facilities like?

Real Estate:
Just because the real estate may be affordable:
how easy is it to sell?  (are there homes that have been on the market for a long time? If so, 'why'?)
is there a variety of real estate (eg: homes, units, town houses, retirement villages, nursing homes)

And........
It's important to go and see places before moving
Visit in all seasons
Go and speak to locals
What's the cost of living like?
Ask if you can speak to people who have moved to the area
Are there activities for you and your partner to do?
Are you moving towards family / friends?
What is Plan B?  (if it doesn’t work out).

I am a retirement writer, seminar speaker and provide content on pre and post retirement. I have co-authored several editions of Where To Retire In Australia, one of Retire Bizzi and writen 21 Ways To Retire.  

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I agree certainly some of the areas in SA listed are retirees being the only ones left!  Few work prospects and younger people moving away because of either no work of few facilities. Not all of them, but as a retiree I want to live somewhere vibrant with facilities within walking distance, theatre, gigs, festivals etc. Happy in a busy town in the Adelaide hills for now, which although it does have an elderly contingent also has young families moving in and 25 mins to CBD.

Everyone has a different idea of retirement, but a small country town in SA isn’t mine.


So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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2 hours ago, rammygirl said:

I agree certainly some of the areas in SA listed are retirees being the only ones left!  Few work prospects and younger people moving away because of either no work of few facilities. Not all of them, but as a retiree I want to live somewhere vibrant with facilities within walking distance, theatre, gigs, festivals etc. Happy in a busy town in the Adelaide hills for now, which although it does have an elderly contingent also has young families moving in and 25 mins to CBD.

Everyone has a different idea of retirement, but a small country town in SA isn’t mine.

Yes, as an ex Croweater, I totally agree 

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It's good that you know what you want in a location.

Listing everything you want in a location is a good idea and actually visiting several times..are people able to stay a while before making a decision?

I have co-authored several editions of Where To Retire In Australia and visited over 200 locations around Australia.  Some places would be great to retire to....others not so.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Jilly said:

Listing everything you want in a location is a good idea and actually visiting several times....

 

I can see how that advice would work for Brits contemplating a move to Europe - cheap airfares, visit off-peak when hotels are cheap, etc.    However, in Australia holiday accommodation is expensive all year round, plus the air fares just to get here, plus domestic airfares aren't that cheap either.   Not many people could afford to visit "several times".

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

I can see how that advice would work for Brits contemplating a move to Europe - cheap airfares, visit off-peak when hotels are cheap, etc.    However, in Australia holiday accommodation is expensive all year round, plus the air fares just to get here, plus domestic airfares aren't that cheap either.   Not many people could afford to visit "several times".

.................  and holiday accommodation doubles during school holidays.  

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Ah yes...for people  from overseas it can be expensive!  

Some retirees in Australia looking to move to an area, tend to 'house sit', use caravan parks etc.  But, as you say the airfares etc are not cheap.

ALSO:

Some towns, however,  are holiday towns and in the 'off season' there may not be a lot of people around.   One area we researched had a street where everyone but a couple of houses (or was it one?) were holiday homes...vacant for weeks at a time. The permanent residents said they did not want to be a 'de-facto' security service for these homes...and they would have liked to have had more 'permanents' around.  Holiday makers usually do not have the time to get to know neighbours.

Quite a few U.K. people have commented to us that they find the cost of eating out, and food generally,  in Australia expensive.

One U.K. couple we met in the cbd..(they emailed us to meet for coffee) also commented on the (small) size of Australian 'gardens' (our 'backyards'). 
'With all your space why don't you have larger gardens?   Mmm....Interesting what visitors see. 

I think for many U.K. people the weather is a big attraction (although today is chilly in southern Australia! ).

 

b each3.jpeg

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7 hours ago, Jilly said:

Ah yes...for people  from overseas it can be expensive!  

Some retirees in Australia looking to move to an area, tend to 'house sit', use caravan parks etc.  But, as you say the airfares etc are not cheap.

ALSO:

Some towns, however,  are holiday towns and in the 'off season' there may not be a lot of people around.   One area we researched had a street where everyone but a couple of houses (or was it one?) were holiday homes...vacant for weeks at a time. The permanent residents said they did not want to be a 'de-facto' security service for these homes...and they would have liked to have had more 'permanents' around.  Holiday makers usually do not have the time to get to know neighbours.

Quite a few U.K. people have commented to us that they find the cost of eating out, and food generally,  in Australia expensive.

One U.K. couple we met in the cbd..(they emailed us to meet for coffee) also commented on the (small) size of Australian 'gardens' (our 'backyards'). 
'With all your space why don't you have larger gardens?   Mmm....Interesting what visitors see. 

I think for many U.K. people the weather is a big attraction (although today is chilly in southern Australia! ).

 

b each3.jpeg

 

City gardens are not large but out of the cities the gardens can be huge.  We are retired (in Tasmania) and did not want a large garden at all but many people we know have over an acre of garden.  If people want a large garden their are loads of houses with very big gardens.  I'm happy with a small one.  😃

Are their many UK people planning a retirement in Australia?  Nobody I know is.  Holidays yes but retirement no.

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Yes, Australian country gardens can be vast. 

I  think the people we met were thinking that city gardens would be much bigger. They went and looked at areas on the Sunshine Coast....new developments and said gardens were small there too.  I guess you can't get it all '100%'.

I'm not hearing about lots of U.K. people retiring to Australia...just yet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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When we bought our place back in 92 retirement wasn't on our radar. Now we are approaching it we were lucky we chose to live where we do.

There are a lot of retirees around the area. There are plenty of them that meet up at the beach every day and go for a swim, even through winter. They have a great group of supporting people and are not too far away from Perth and Joondalup. Public transport is good, shopping centres, doctors, dentists, major hospitals all within easy reach.

To my idea much better than moving to a country town with other retirees. Mixing with younger people and the exercise they get keeps them feeling younger themselves.

Great place to retire I reckon.

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Do you live near Mandurah?

Goodness...hasn't that area developed over the years.

That is a good point you make...some people like being around retirees, others, like you, want a more diverse age group.

Looking at the age groups in an area is another aspect we look at when researching areas.

This aspect is  not something  that many  people necessarily think about.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

beach.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Retired here 20 years ago, Downtown Ball Bay.  No earthly reason to change from my peaceful backwater.

P1060975.JPG.04cf864e306f335030582e2e4403df44.JPG

No shops, no litter, part of a community rather than a face in a rat race.

Uptown Ball Bay,  looking downtown...

IMG_0015.thumb.JPG.d6622395e087667dfb2cf71addce257c.JPG

Cheers, Bobj.

PS. The phone booth and a school bus shelter are the only public utilities in the village.

 

 

Edited by Bobj
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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, Paul1Perth said:

When we bought our place back in 92 retirement wasn't on our radar. Now we are approaching it we were lucky we chose to live where we do.

There are a lot of retirees around the area. There are plenty of them that meet up at the beach every day and go for a swim, even through winter. They have a great group of supporting people and are not too far away from Perth and Joondalup. Public transport is good, shopping centres, doctors, dentists, major hospitals all within easy reach.

To my idea much better than moving to a country town with other retirees. Mixing with younger people and the exercise they get keeps them feeling younger themselves.

Great place to retire I reckon.

I know where you live and it is very nice!

Even here on the north coast of Tassie there are a few people who swim year round.  😯  I'm a tough old dame but the sea is far too cold for me here in the wintertime.  There is a good indoor pool here for the softies like me.  😄

 

splash.jpg

Edited by Toots
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25 minutes ago, Jilly said:

 

Do you live near Mandurah?

Goodness...hasn't that area developed over the years.

That is a good point you make...some people like being around retirees, others, like you, want a more diverse age group.

Looking at the age groups in an area is another aspect we look at when researching areas.

This aspect is  not something  that many  people necessarily think about.

www.where2now.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

beach.jpg

Not Mandurah, Northern suburbs, close to Hillarys boat harbour.

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23 minutes ago, Bobj said:

Retired here 20 years ago, Downtown Ball Bay.  No earthly reason to change from my peaceful backwater.

P1060975.JPG.04cf864e306f335030582e2e4403df44.JPG

No shops, no litter, part of a community rather than a face in a rat race.

Uptown Ball Bay,  looking downtown...

IMG_0015.thumb.JPG.d6622395e087667dfb2cf71addce257c.JPG

Cheers, Bobj.

PS. The phone booth and a school bus shelter are the only public utilities in the village.

 

 

Looks great Bob. 

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20 minutes ago, Toots said:

I know where you live and it is very nice!

Even here on the north coast of Tassie there are a few people who swim year round.  😯  I'm a tough old dame but the sea is far too cold for me here in the wintertime.  There is a good indoor pool here for the softies like me.  😄

 

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Nice pool Toots. I prefer outdoor and there is a great outdoor 50m at Craigie. Warm enough for all year round.

There's an indoor 50m at Joondalup for the wusses😊

Still going in the sea a fair bit but it's getting cooler.

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All look wonderful!!

Would you like to let me know a little more about your areas?

Would love to hear more....

If you would, please go to the 'Contact Us' page on my website and send me an email, that would be great.

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Toots said:

.................  and holiday accommodation doubles during school holidays.  

Not just in Australia same happens in the UK and the rest of Europe. Not so in Asia though fortunately. 

Edited by Sandgroper

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Paul1Perth said:

Nice pool Toots. I prefer outdoor and there is a great outdoor 50m at Craigie. Warm enough for all year round.

There's an indoor 50m at Joondalup for the wusses😊

Still going in the sea a fair bit but it's getting cooler.

We also have an outdoor pool in Devonport but I prefer to swim in the sea in the summer.

 

splash2.jpg

Edited by Toots

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3 hours ago, Bobj said:

Retired here 20 years ago, Downtown Ball Bay.  No earthly reason to change from my peaceful backwater.

P1060975.JPG.04cf864e306f335030582e2e4403df44.JPG

No shops, no litter, part of a community rather than a face in a rat race.

Uptown Ball Bay,  looking downtown...

IMG_0015.thumb.JPG.d6622395e087667dfb2cf71addce257c.JPG

Cheers, Bobj.

PS. The phone booth and a school bus shelter are the only public utilities in the village.

 

 

That’s awful.  When are you escaping to blighty?

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4 hours ago, Bobj said:

Retired here 20 years ago, Downtown Ball Bay.  No earthly reason to change from my peaceful backwater.

P1060975.JPG.04cf864e306f335030582e2e4403df44.JPG

No shops, no litter, part of a community rather than a face in a rat race.

Uptown Ball Bay,  looking downtown...

IMG_0015.thumb.JPG.d6622395e087667dfb2cf71addce257c.JPG

Cheers, Bobj.

PS. The phone booth and a school bus shelter are the only public utilities in the village.

 

 

I remember that rush hour photo Bob!!!!

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6 hours ago, Jilly said:

 

Yes, Australian country gardens can be vast. 

I  think the people we met were thinking that city gardens would be much bigger. They went and looked at areas on the Sunshine Coast....new developments and said gardens were small there too.  I guess you can't get it all '100%'.

I'm not hearing about lots of U.K. people retiring to Australia...just yet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

beach.jpg

Well as a UK retiree on the Sunshine Coast, i am one of many many ex Brits here. Most of us don’t want a big garden a). because we are out all the time enjoying life,    b) because it gets hot with high humidity for 3/4 months of the year and gardening is tough then. Plenty of houses for sale that aren’t on the crowded new housing estates. 

No idea how many want to retire here these days, but a lot of us came on the old retirement visa. Now the only option would seem to be as parents applying for the parent visa.

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The Sunshine Coast certainly has grown, @ramot.Coolum was a few scattered houses and a caravan park.

 I did the initial base investigation for the Coolum High School. The whole area was a paddock. I think it was  in 1982/3 

Cheers, Bobj.

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