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Vicky87

weather in Melbourne

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hi guys

just wondered what the weather is really in Melbourne? We are torn between Perth and Melbourne - Perth because the weather and beaches, and we really liked it when we visited... and Melbourne because of job prospects and proximity to other places..

one of my main hates about the British summer is the that you can't plan anything in advance as you don't know what the weather will be doing - is it the same here? 

 

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Melbourne's weather is definitely unpredictable.  Having lived in Sydney for 30 years, it's taken me a while to get used to carrying an umbrella on a sunny day again, like I used to in the UK.  

Don't get me wrong, the weather is definitely sunny and warm more often than the UK, but it is very variable.  That's one reason I like it, because I found the heat and humidity in Sydney was getting worse and I don't cope with it well.  Perth has a nice balanced climate, which I would like even better, but it's not my kind of place.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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4 hours ago, Vicky87 said:

one of my main hates about the British summer is the that you can't plan anything in advance as you don't know what the weather will be doing - is it the same here? 

 

Melbourne has 4 seasons and can be variable...but I doubt whether there are many occasions where you can't plan in advance or have to cancel because of the weather.  I don't live in Melbourne...but I'm in Hobart, which is a bit cooler than Melbourne but otherwise similar,  and there would be very few days where the weather upsets plans.

Perth can get very hot in summer and, although that may sound nice in the middle of a UK winter,  some people find that difficult to deal with when living and working a regular life.  We have "climate refugees" here who have moved from Perth because of the heat.  So that's a consideration too.

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1 hour ago, Skani said:

Melbourne has 4 seasons and can be variable...but I doubt whether there are many occasions where you can't plan in advance or have to cancel because of the weather.  I don't live in Melbourne...but I'm in Hobart, which is a bit cooler than Melbourne but otherwise similar,  and there would be very few days where the weather upsets plans.

Perth can get very hot in summer and, although that may sound nice in the middle of a UK winter,  some people find that difficult to deal with when living and working a regular life.  We have "climate refugees" here who have moved from Perth because of the heat.  So that's a consideration too.

I don't think Melbourne weather is that similar to Tassie.   Tasmania is cooler but it's also less volatile. 

Melbourne is in a unique position - it's on the edge of a very hot continent but there's also nothing but Tasmania between it and the Antarctic.   So we can get the same cold weather as Tassie when the weather is coming from the south - but when the weather is coming from the north, Melbourne gets a hot blast straight from the interior  (whereas by the time it gets to Tasmania, it's been tempered by the sea).  When the wind changes, so does the weather, and because of Melbourne's wide streets, grid layout and flat terrain, the wind has few obstacles and the change happens quickly.

That's why, even in Melbourne's recent heatwave, I could go for a walk every morning in a lovely fresh breeze, even though it was 38 degrees by 3pm.  

As for planning - yes, I do think the weather upsets plans.  Statistically, it rains much less in Melbourne than in Sydney - but in Sydney, it all falls in huge thunderplumps, whereas in Melbourne it's spread over lots of smaller rain events.  Sydneysiders don't know the meaning of words like "a light shower" or "drizzle".  Melburnians do.   I go out with a walking group on Tuesdays.   When I joined, on the first few walks I (a) got caught in a rainstorm with no umbrella, (b) almost froze to death because the wind got up and I hadn't brought a jacket and (c) had sweat dripping off my nose because I wore a jumper and the sun came out.  On each occasion, it had been fine and mild when I stepped out of my door.  

All that makes it sound as though the weather is horrible, but it's not that bad. You just need to pay much closer attention to the weather forecast, and be flexible with your plans.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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10 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

We get four seasons in one day in spring here.  Have to say on the north west coast our summers are day after day of sunshine and an average of 23C.  We get the odd day of rain which is very welcome but on the whole this summer has been wonderful.  A lot of folk on the mainland state they wouldn't like the weather in Tassie but for me, it's a helluva lot more pleasant than the summer heat and humidity they experience though some people love the heat.  My sister spent a week in Melbourne before flying back to Edinburgh and she really liked the city.

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that's an interesting article, thanks for sending it over.. It does make me think it might be too changeable for us. i like seasons but not a fan of the wind/ rain for too long! Although i imagine having a hot summer you may appreciate the cold more...! 

a lot to consider as we only really want to move once and make a go of it.. i loved Sydney when we were there but the fact we could never afford to buy a house has put us off! X

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1 hour ago, Vicky87 said:

that's an interesting article, thanks for sending it over.. It does make me think it might be too changeable for us. i like seasons but not a fan of the wind/ rain for too long! Although i imagine having a hot summer you may appreciate the cold more...! 

a lot to consider as we only really want to move once and make a go of it.. i loved Sydney when we were there but the fact we could never afford to buy a house has put us off! X

I may be wrong, but it sounds as though you're choosing one city over the other based purely on weather.   Be careful about that, because each Australian city has its own character, even though we all sound pretty much the same.  It's not a case of one city being better than another, but that they'll suit different kinds of people.

For instance, my niece came to Sydney on a WHV, and loved it, to the point where she wanted to migrate (but she wasn't eligible).   Much later, she got the chance of a transfer to Perth with her work and she jumped at the chance.   She disliked it so much, she transferred back to the London office the first chance she got!  

Personally, I wouldn't care to live in Perth, but Melbourne suits me fine, in spite of the weather.   But I have friends who live in Perth and can't imagine living in Sydney or Melbourne.  Each to their own, but people can get quite passionate about it.

Just read this thread to get some idea:

 

 

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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you are right, weather is a huge factor as its one of the main reasons we are looking to move.. 

i loved Sydney as a place, we visited in winter and i still loved it! I just wonder whether its more a place to visit than a place to live..  my husband preferred Perth and i did really like it too, i could see us as a family settling down there as its more laidback

Could be because we were there longer than Melbourne though which is why i didn't like to rule it out.. I just know Perth is struggling with work and worry it could end in a disaster! I guess whereas we decide its going to be difficult it begin with!

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39 minutes ago, Vicky87 said:

you are right, weather is a huge factor as its one of the main reasons we are looking to move.. 

TBH I think weather is a really, really bad reason to move to Australia.  If sun is the only thing that you're looking for, why not just move to Cornwall? It will cost you a hell of a lot less and the climate is probably better!  

It may be hard for you to believe, but you'd be surprised how many people come to Australia looking forward to the weather, and end up hating it.  Actually, in winter you saw Sydney weather at its best - the weather is cool by Australian standards,  and the sky is clear and blue.    Queensland is fabulous in winter, too.   Australia in summer is a different story.  It can be bloody hot.  The heat can be exhausting when you have to live in it all the time. If you've holidayed in the South of Spain, it's like that but even more sizzling - and you're going to have to commute to work in it, and lug bags of shopping, you can't just collapse on the beach like you can on holiday.

Check out a UV map of Australia.  All summer long, most of Australia is classed as "extreme", meaning the WHO advises you shouldn't even go out in the sun between about 10am and 4pm, even with sunscreen. In the UK, the UV index never gets above 8 - in Australia, it gets up to 13 (which isn't even shown on some scales).   Most Australians ignore the WHO warning, but that's why Aussies have the highest rate of skin cancer in the world.  We are beginning to pay some attention - children go to school in long sleeves and legionnaire's caps, and play under a huge sail instead of in an open playground.  They swim in "rash suits" to cover their arms and legs.

I know I'm making it sound awful but it isn't, really.  Brits stay indoors when it rains, we stay in the air conditioning when it's too hot, so it's manageable.  Also, everyone is different and some people revel in the hot weather.  Different people react differently to the heat - and if you're an early riser, then you can get down to the beach or to the golf course at the crack of dawn and get back in the house, or head to work, before the heat becomes a problem.  So it is an individual thing, and maybe you'll love it.  I'm just pointing out that Australian weather is not necessarily "better",  it's different.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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The climate played  a part in us moving and where we settled and i'd imagine it does with lots of migrants. We were over the uk weather it and wanted heat and sun and to be able to plan ahead knowing 99% of the time what the weather would be doing. We did try Spain but when the opportunity arose we choose to have an adventure here instead, Cornwall etc didnt hold the atraction and although we liked Wales ,we couldnt get the jobs ,we had a chance to come here, we took it ,it worked.

Cal x

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If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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Nearly every time I've been to Sydney it has rained- they get a lot more than Melbourne which is a very dry place in Summer- so you have to water your garden a lot or is just dies. When we first emigrated many years ago now I didn't wear a coat for 2 years in winter because it was so mild compared with the UK.  In those days it was colder than now, too.  As for not being able to plan, never heard such rubbish in my life.  It is very rare indeed to have to cancel because of bad weather , except maybe in the middle of Winter, June July.

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We moved to Oz in retirement for a couple of reasons, and one was definitely for the weather. We retired here from Brunei and the thought of going back to UK weather did not appeal, we were too used to sunny weather. The Sunshine Coast suits us fine, the humidity is high for about 3 months (except this year has been unusually low so far) perfect weather for the other 9. I find Sydney more humid. Sorry can't help with Melbourne or Perth weather.

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i live in wales, its wet! I think Cornwall is the same - lots of rain usually. 

there are other reasons we want to move that's just one of them.. I am aware we would still be in hibernation in Jan - just because of the sun not rain lol especially in the early years while we get used to the heat

I'm surprised Sydney is more humid than the sunshine coast! 

you have made me think of jobs prospects for children though, in that respect maybe Melbourne would be better as there's definitely more opportunities.. Back to the drawing board!!

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45 minutes ago, Vicky87 said:

i live in wales, its wet! I think Cornwall is the same - lots of rain usually. 

there are other reasons we want to move that's just one of them.. I am aware we would still be in hibernation in Jan - just because of the sun not rain lol especially in the early years while we get used to the heat

I'm surprised Sydney is more humid than the sunshine coast! 

you have made me think of jobs prospects for children though, in that respect maybe Melbourne would be better as there's definitely more opportunities.. Back to the drawing board!!

Sydney possibly isn't more humid, I haven't checked any statistics, it just feels it when I visit fairly regularly, but it is a city and here on the coast we get sea breezes so although humid it feels fresher.

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3 hours ago, Marisawright said:

TBH I think weather is a really, really bad reason to move to Australia.  If sun is the only thing that you're looking for, why not just move to Cornwall? It will cost you a hell of a lot less and the climate is probably better!  

It may be hard for you to believe, but you'd be surprised how many people come to Australia looking forward to the weather, and end up hating it.  Actually, in winter you saw Sydney weather at its best - the weather is cool by Australian standards,  and the sky is clear and blue.    Queensland is fabulous in winter, too.   Australia in summer is a different story.  It can be bloody hot.  The heat can be exhausting when you have to live in it all the time. If you've holidayed in the South of Spain, it's like that but even more sizzling - and you're going to have to commute to work in it, and lug bags of shopping, you can't just collapse on the beach like you can on holiday.

Check out a UV map of Australia.  All summer long, most of Australia is classed as "extreme", meaning the WHO advises you shouldn't even go out in the sun between about 10am and 4pm, even with sunscreen. In the UK, the UV index never gets above 8 - in Australia, it gets up to 13 (which isn't even shown on some scales).   Most Australians ignore the WHO warning, but that's why Aussies have the highest rate of skin cancer in the world.  We are beginning to pay some attention - children go to school in long sleeves and legionnaire's caps, and play under a huge sail instead of in an open playground.  They swim in "rash suits" to cover their arms and legs.

I know I'm making it sound awful but it isn't, really.  Brits stay indoors when it rains, we stay in the air conditioning when it's too hot, so it's manageable.  Also, everyone is different and some people revel in the hot weather.  Different people react differently to the heat - and if you're an early riser, then you can get down to the beach or to the golf course at the crack of dawn and get back in the house, or head to work, before the heat becomes a problem.  So it is an individual thing, and maybe you'll love it.  I'm just pointing out that Australian weather is not necessarily "better",  it's different.

It's not often we agree but on this I am wholeheartedly with you, moving to the other side of the world for 'better' weather is potentially a recipe for disaster. 

To the OP be aware that the scorching sun can be just as disruptive to your plans as rain. I realise you said you are from Wales so you get more rain than the rest of the UK combined lol. When looking at a potential region to look at consider what sort of weather you would prefer, Brisbane gets an almost unbelievable amount of rain for relatively short periods and is very humid for 3 or 4 months. Sydney gets a lot of rain and can also be very hot and humid. Melbourne can be very hot and very cold but generally is the most like the UK. 

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9 hours ago, Vicky87 said:

i live in wales, its wet!... I am aware we would still be in hibernation in Jan - just because of the sun not rain lol especially in the early years while we get used to the heat

I'm surprised Sydney is more humid than the sunshine coast! 

In hibernation in January?  It was 42 degrees here last week and it's February.  February can be worse than January, and you never get used to 42 degrees!

Sydney isn't more humid on paper, but as Ramot said, it's where you live. If you're on the Sunshine Coast you're probably near the sea.   In Sydney, most of the population lives out West (only the rich can afford the $4 million houses near the beaches!). The further inland you go, the hotter and more humid you get.  By the time you get to Parramatta, which is the demographic centre of Sydney, the sea breezes are long gone, the temperature is at least two degrees hotter than the coast, and it can be very humid.

Just to make your life more complicated, if you like Sydney but want to be more laidback, have you looked at Newcastle?   It's not commutable to Sydney but it's doable for outings (about two hours' drive), the housing is cheaper than either Perth or Melbourne, it has lovely beaches right in town, it's on the edge of the wineries region.  The only question is work opportunities because it's a smaller city, but I believe the economy there is doing fairly well at the moment.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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38 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

In hibernation in January?  It was 42 degrees here last week and it's February.  February can be worse than January, and you never get used to 42 degrees!

Sydney isn't more humid on paper, but as Ramot said, it's where you live. If you're on the Sunshine Coast you're probably near the sea.   In Sydney, most of the population lives out West (only the rich can afford the $4 million houses near the beaches!). The further inland you go, the hotter and more humid you get.  By the time you get to Parramatta, which is the demographic centre of Sydney, the sea breezes are long gone, the temperature is at least two degrees hotter than the coast, and it can be very humid.

Just to make your life more complicated, if you like Sydney but want to be more laidback, have you looked at Newcastle?   It's not commutable to Sydney but it's doable for outings (about two hours' drive), the housing is cheaper than either Perth or Melbourne, it has lovely beaches right in town, it's on the edge of the wineries region.  The only question is work opportunities because it's a smaller city, but I believe the economy there is doing fairly well at the moment.

I have a friend who lives in Liverpool and another in the Penrith area.  The heat out there is stifling in the summer.  Definitely far hotter the further out west of the city you go.

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On 2/10/2018 at 10:02, Marisawright said:

I don't think Melbourne weather is that similar to Tassie.   Tasmania is cooler but it's also less volatile. 

Tasmania and southern Victoria share the same prevailing weather pattern - the southern edge of highs over the continent interrupted frequently by cold (or cooler) fronts coming from the  southwest over the Southern Ocean. That's according to the Bureau of Meteorology - not my personal opinion.  ^_^ 

  A perfect example was a fortnight ago:   37 C in Hobart on the Sunday.....snow falling (and settling for a while) on the mountain  on Tuesday night.   The changeability is just normal here and you  learn to keep a close watch on weather forecasts and go out prepared for everything.   I don't usually think about it until visitors comment on it....and then you realise/remember  that it's not like that everywhere.    But actually having to cancel a planned event because of the weather happens very rarely.

(I always chuckle about fashion articles proclaiming "layering" to be the trend for a particular season.  Layering is the standard way of dressing here - layers on and off several times during a normal day  :rolleyes:).

Quote

Melbourne gets a hot blast straight from the interior  (whereas by the time it gets to Tasmania, it's been tempered by the sea)

That's true for the north coast.  But in that hot weather the northerly wind picks up heat from the land mass of Tasmania and the central and southern parts of the state cop it too - especially away from the coast - although usually (mercifully) a few degrees cooler than Melbourne.

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i never thought of Newcastle..We're not against looking at towns rather than cities, its just whether my husband can get work. he may have to start working away from home here soon which we don't want, and don't want the same thing happening over there

we're hoping to find somewhere we can provide a better lifestyle for our daughter and future children.. and also open up opportunities for them. Even if it  doesn't work out for us, I'm hoping we can stay long enough to get citizenship for their future (big hope given the cost of living!)

you've definitely put me off Sydney, that doesn't sound like my idea of fun!! We didn't like Brisbane at all and figured sun all year round wouldn't be for us.. I guess its looking where seems to offer the most employment prospects as well, is seek.com.au the best for this?

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i also had not thought sun could change your plans?! Typical Brit i guess lol

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1 hour ago, Vicky87 said:

i never thought of Newcastle..We're not against looking at towns rather than cities, its just whether my husband can get work. he may have to start working away from home here soon which we don't want, and don't want the same thing happening over there

we're hoping to find somewhere we can provide a better lifestyle for our daughter and future children.. and also open up opportunities for them. Even if it  doesn't work out for us, I'm hoping we can stay long enough to get citizenship for their future (big hope given the cost of living!)

you've definitely put me off Sydney, that doesn't sound like my idea of fun!! We didn't like Brisbane at all and figured sun all year round wouldn't be for us.. I guess its looking where seems to offer the most employment prospects as well, is seek.com.au the best for this?

It's interesting but it is why others can't help as far as where to live. I couldn't live in Sydney because of the insane house prices but also the weather and just the amount of people there. Equally I don't think I could live back down in Victoria again. Adelaide just really doesn't appeal. I really liked Brisbane and believe me it isn't sun all year round lol

As has been said numerous times by numerous people on here you don't have to move to the other side of the world to provide a better lifestyle for your children, this is a myth that just seemingly never dies lol. Neither country gives everyone a better lifestyle. 

Have you looked at house prices in various area ?  

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Loving life in Gods Country. Woohoo, look at me. 

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what made you make the move? 

I've looked briefly at Perth house prices.. I think we could afford a decent house within 30 min commute to the centre.. 

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2 hours ago, Vicky87 said:

what made you make the move? 

I've looked briefly at Perth house prices.. I think we could afford a decent house within 30 min commute to the centre.. 

Well my wife never wanted to live in Australia so it was a no brainer for her and although I grew up in Australia I just feel much more comfortable in England so it was actually a fairly simple decision really.

Perth is somewhere I would never want to live, if we ever returned to Australia it just wouldn't figure in our plans, it's just way too isolated. It does suit some though. House prices seem to be coming down since the mining boom came to an end. 

Edited by bristolman

Loving life in Gods Country. Woohoo, look at me. 

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12 hours ago, Vicky87 said:

i never thought of Newcastle..We're not against looking at towns rather than cities, its just whether my husband can get work. he may have to start working away from home here soon which we don't want, and don't want the same thing happening over there

we're hoping to find somewhere we can provide a better lifestyle for our daughter and future children.. and also open up opportunities for them. Even if it  doesn't work out for us, I'm hoping we can stay long enough to get citizenship for their future (big hope given the cost of living!)

you've definitely put me off Sydney, that doesn't sound like my idea of fun!! We didn't like Brisbane at all and figured sun all year round wouldn't be for us.. I guess its looking where seems to offer the most employment prospects as well, is seek.com.au the best for this?

Yes, Seek is a good place to get an idea of vacancies (though unless your skills are really in demand, it's almost impossible to get a job offer while you're in the UK).  What does your husband do?

"Big hope given the cost of living"- not sure what you mean?  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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