MaggieMay24

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MaggieMay24 last won the day on June 6 2016

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About MaggieMay24

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  1. The only occupations he could consider are Ship's Engineer, Ship's Master and Ship's Officer. I have no idea what education/experience are required to pass the skills assessment so he would need to refer to the AMSA website for that. He'd then need to have the minimum 60 points to apply for an invitation for a visa. If he did study in Australia, he may be eligible for a 485 visa after graduating but again I don't know the skills assessment requirements or whether that would bring him closer to eligibility for a PR visa.
  2. To qualify for citizenship, you need to live in Australia on a PR visa for 4 years prior to lodging your citizenship application. During those 4 years, you can't have spent more than 12 months outside Australia including no more than 3 months in the final year. Your PR visa comes with 5-year entry rights. If you have not become a citizen before the entry rights expire, then you would need another visa (typically a RRV) in order to enter Australia from overseas. Whether you are eligible for an RRV will depend on a few things. If you have lived in Australia for 2 of the 5 years before submitting your RRV application, then you would be eligible for a 5-year RRV. If you haven't lived in Australia at least 2 years, then you may be eligible for a shorter RRV (1-year or 3-month) depending on whether you are living in Australia when you apply or whether you have strong ties to Australia. If you wanted to, you could move over the day before the 5-year travel rights expire and as long as you don't need to leave the country for any reason, there may be no need to get an RRV.
  3. If your PR visa is granted before you fly, it would over-write the visitor visa and it would activate as soon as you arrive in Australia on your holiday.
  4. Unfortunately that seems to be pretty standard at the moment due to a high volume of applications. All you can do is try to remain patient and they will get in touch with you if they need more information.
  5. The processing times are unavailable due to low volume of applications. The visa is still available.
  6. Teaching occupations are on both the long-term and short-term lists. However planning to move when you are a student can have a few issues. Firstly, students are supposed to confirm their intention is to study only and that they meet the Genuine Temporary Entrant criteria. I think the government is also tightening up on this criteria. Secondly, although teaching occupations are on both lists at the moment, things can change drastically between now and when you graduate.
  7. You need to have lived in Australia for 4 years on a PR visa, so you would need to count from the date you entered the country. From that point you cannot have spent more than 12 months outside Australia, including no more than 3 months in the most recent year.
  8. If you include your partner on your application, you will pay the additional fee (approx. $1800 I think) and he'll need to complete the medical and police checks. You'll also need to provide evidence of your relationship (married or de facto at least 12 months). Your partner will then receive a 189 visa as well when yours is granted.
  9. If you already have your PR visa, you don't need to notify DIBP about any changes in your occupation, employer, etc.
  10. Please remember that this thread is about 457 visa holders and their options to apply for PR. If you want to discuss the plight of the refugee claimants and their detention, this should be taken to a new thread. Thank you.
  11. There could be dozens and dozens of reasons people have a 187 refused. You need to research and study the requirements for the visa and then make sure you meet these. If you are uncertain, then using a migration agent will give you a much better chance for success.
  12. Comparing the decision regarding the 457 with the outcome of the refugee class action is comparing apples and oranges. The 457 was only ever a temporary visa. 457 visa holders should always have come to Australia with the knowledge that their prospects for PR could vanish if they lost their jobs, if their employer wasn't able or willing to sponsor PR, if the rules changed, etc. The change to the 457 is only affecting those who have an application lodged or planning to lodge as of the effective date of the announcement. It's still unknown whether there will be grandfathering for those already on a 457 making them eligible for a PR visa (again, if their employer is able and willing to sponsor them).
  13. An agency can't tell you that you've been accepted unless you have actually submitted the application (including paying the fee) and it's been granted. At best, they can tell you that you are eligible and that they think your prospects look good. The 417 WHV costs AUD$440 or approx. GBP 285. You can find information about applying yourself at http://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/417-
  14. @Majid shsam there have been several replies to your posts already - you are not eligible for a Working Holiday Visa (417 or 462) since your country is not eligible. So you need to look at other visa categories. You will need to do a lot of your own research about this, or you may be better to speak with a migration agent for their professional assistance.
  15. I still chuckle that anyone with a Canadian passport is exempt from the English requirement. Anyone who has travelled north of Montreal or Quebec City would come across a lot of people who speak no English at all.