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Ben678

Moving from U.K. to Aus

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posting in this section as wasn’t sure where to put it was sent from Reddit as someone recommended this website to me as there relations with a moderator. I’m going to read through as a lot of useful info on here mean while my post below thank you kindly  

 

So Iv been wanting to move to Australia for a few years now there’s a few things that really appeal to me as a person and to us as a family. We are prepared to work hard for it. I am hoping to document this process as I go. 

As far as how far we want to go  We would like to get permanent citizenship out there eventually with no turning back! 

Age me and my partner both 30 with a child of 13 now. Ideally we would like to move to either Brisbane area or Perth. We are massive beach go’ers love paddle boarding surfing and camping. This is mainly what we would do in our spare time. 

Jobs - 

This is my main bug about everything Iv read online or seen on YouTube etc. Everyone moving out there either has a higher degree or masters and it seems this is the only way to guarantee some good points for visa application. But is it possible to do on a medium / white collar jobs.

Im medically trained to an emergency level with internationally recognised qualifications including driving. ( however not completed a degree yet.) I am currently trained as a bar/ hospitality supervisor currently. ( mad switch I know but it has its reasons) I do still participate in community first responder roles to keep on top of my skills. 

My partner is a property manager for local property firm. ( sure I read somewhere she could get a sponsored visa from a new employer out in aus. But this is a 2 year temporary visa. 


Education - we are hoping to tie this in with when are child has completed her GSCE’s so we can look at colleges over in aus. This gives a time scale of around 33 months. 

We will
Be seeking advice from a authorised migration company. But just wanted some free advice if anyone has any here Has any insight this would
Be great !

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Posted (edited)

You don’t need a degree if your occupation doesn’t normally require one. There may be visa opportunities in regional Australia for your wife’s occupation, but it is unclear from your post what your current occupation actually is, so hard to comment on options. WA and QLD are both currently closed to offshore applicants but that will eventually free up. WA has a very short list of occupations they are interested in sponsoring and you will need either a state or an employer sponsorship, based on what you have said. 
As you say, a proper consultation with all the facts available, is the way to go to understand what the options really are. 

Edited by paulhand
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____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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1 hour ago, Ben678 said:

posting in this section as wasn’t sure where to put it was sent from Reddit as someone recommended this website to me as there relations with a moderator. I’m going to read through as a lot of useful info on here mean while my post below thank you kindly  

 

So Iv been wanting to move to Australia for a few years now there’s a few things that really appeal to me as a person and to us as a family. We are prepared to work hard for it. I am hoping to document this process as I go. 

As far as how far we want to go  We would like to get permanent citizenship out there eventually with no turning back! 

Age me and my partner both 30 with a child of 13 now. Ideally we would like to move to either Brisbane area or Perth. We are massive beach go’ers love paddle boarding surfing and camping. This is mainly what we would do in our spare time. 

Jobs - 

This is my main bug about everything Iv read online or seen on YouTube etc. Everyone moving out there either has a higher degree or masters and it seems this is the only way to guarantee some good points for visa application. But is it possible to do on a medium / white collar jobs.

Im medically trained to an emergency level with internationally recognised qualifications including driving. ( however not completed a degree yet.) I am currently trained as a bar/ hospitality supervisor currently. ( mad switch I know but it has its reasons) I do still participate in community first responder roles to keep on top of my skills. 

My partner is a property manager for local property firm. ( sure I read somewhere she could get a sponsored visa from a new employer out in aus. But this is a 2 year temporary visa. 


Education - we are hoping to tie this in with when are child has completed her GSCE’s so we can look at colleges over in aus. This gives a time scale of around 33 months. 

We will
Be seeking advice from a authorised migration company. But just wanted some free advice if anyone has any here Has any insight this would
Be great !

@paulhand has responded above with some thoughts and I recommend if you are going to speak to an agent consider paul as he gives a lot of time and advice on the forum and is appropriately registered and has a good reputation on this site.

sorry I know nothing about visas these days but paul does!

good luck with your journey, others may also be along to assist and offer opinions and insights once australia wakes up. 🙃

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48 minutes ago, paulhand said:

You don’t need a degree if your occupation doesn’t normally require one. There may be visa opportunities in regional Australia for your wife’s occupation, but it is unclear from your post what your current occupation actually is, so hard to comment on options. WA and QLD are both currently closed to offshore applicants but that will eventually free up. WA has a very short list of occupations they are interested in sponsoring and you will need either a state or an employer sponsorship, based on what you have said. 
As you say, a proper consultation with all the facts available, is the way to go to understand what the options really are. 

For the medical side of things I am trained as a technician for the ambulance service it’s one step under paramedic Instead of going to finish off a degree I went the other way about it and completed something called a FREC course. I’m trained in emergency care and emergency response driving the response driving is internationally recognised but the FREC’s are only nationally however I do have all certificates and coursework to back up these certificates including what they cover. 

I was thinking about going into hospital care and completing my Nursing training  but that’s something I’d like to perhaps complete out there if possible. 
 What happens with the sponsorship side of things? Does this enable your employer to extend a temporary visa for example ? 
 

thanks for your advice Paul 

 

also  this is going to sound dreadful but me and my partner are not married have been together for 5-6 years however would it be better for a visa application for us to get married before we look at moving or does it not make much of a difference  

hoping they do start opening up again as we desperately want to get out there and stay and start a new life over in aus. 

The FREC suite has been developed by the Awarding Body Qualsafe, and clinically endorsed by the Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh’s Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care.

 

 

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I notice you say you have a child aged 13 but also say you’ve been together 5-6 years.  Apologies if I’ve understood it wrong but if you’re not the biological father are you aware your partner needs their permission to take the child.  Just trying to make sure you have as much information as possible.  Best of luck.

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24 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

I notice you say you have a child aged 13 but also say you’ve been together 5-6 years.  Apologies if I’ve understood it wrong but if you’re not the biological father are you aware your partner needs their permission to take the child.  Just trying to make sure you have as much information as possible.  Best of luck.

Hi,
no your fine, no i am not the biological father however permission has been granted. 
 

thank you ! 

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2 hours ago, Ben678 said:

Hi,
no your fine, no i am not the biological father however permission has been granted. 

Ultimately you'll need that permission in writing on a statutory declaration form, properly witnessed by an appropriate official. 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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3 hours ago, Ben678 said:

also  this is going to sound dreadful but me and my partner are not married have been together for 5-6 years however would it be better for a visa application for us to get married before we look at moving or does it not make much of a difference  

 

This is one of the nice things about Australia.  There is absolutely nothing "dreadful" about not being married.   Where i come from in Scotland, "living together' is still referred to with derogatory words ("she's got a bidie-in").

In Australia, if a couple are living together, it's referred to as "de facto" and seen as perfectly normal.  Partners in a de factor couple have the same legal rights as a married couple.  So it makes no difference at all to the visa process.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Ben678 said:

I was thinking about going into hospital care and completing my Nursing training  but that’s something I’d like to perhaps complete out there if possible. 

If you mean coming to Australia on a student visa to do a course, then a graduate visa which allows you to get the necessary experience to get a permanent visa, then it is a legal pathway which an agent may suggest - but no, don't do it. It's an expensive, uncertain road with lots of opportunities for things to go wrong, and you may end up back in the UK with no savings left.  

On the other hand, if your wife is eligible to be the principal applicant, then there would be nothing to stop you studying if you wish. Just make sure you look at the cost of training in the UK compared to Australia.  Also, if you're not planning to migrate for another few years, it would make a lot more sense to get the training done now, so you're job-ready when you arrive. 

3 hours ago, Ben678 said:

 What happens with the sponsorship side of things? Does this enable your employer to extend a temporary visa for example ? 

Employer sponsorship is usually a 482, which is a for 2 or 4 years with the option to renew once.   For some occupations, once you've completed most of the contract, there is the option to apply for a permanent visa (although notice, it is only an option to apply - there's no guarantee you'll be accepted, and many are not).  

Employers can offer a permanent sponsorship visa (a 186 DE), which would be an ideal solution for you.  You just have to stay with that employer for two years, then you're free to work anywhere.  Unfortunately it's not commonly offered.  

Normally I would advise against taking a 482 if you want to migrate permanently.  It's great for young people with no kids, who can travel light, and if it doesn't work out, they just pack their bags and head back to the UK, nothing lost.  If you have a family and an established home, it will cost several thousand pounds to move, then you have to create a proper home while you're in Oz, then if it doesn't work out, it'll cost you several thousand pounds to get home again.  The other issue is that you're tied to that employer for duration of the visa, and some employers take advantage of that.  They know that if you leave their job, you'll have to leave the country.  So they can get way with making you work unreasonable hours/refuse holidays etc, because they know there's nothing you can do about it.   Also of course, if the business goes bust or you get retrenched, your job is gone and so is the visa, and you have to go home.

So overall, it is a big risk and you have to consider how it would affect your child's education if your wife got sponsored, but it didn't work out somehow and you had to go home early.  

Unfortunately at the moment, normal migration is pretty much at a standstill.  Even once it gets moving again, there is a HUGE backlog of applications for permanent visas already in the pipeline.  That's going to make it difficult to get a permanent visa if you're just applying now.

At the end of the day, your first step is to book a consultation with an agent.  Paul Hand comes well-recommended and has certainly proved himself to be very helpful on these forums.  If you want to get two quotes, try Go Matilda.  However, considering that the whole migration process will cost you in the region of £30K, the cost of one-off consultation is a drop in the bucket.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Hi Ben

Regarding your child, they don't leave school here until they around 17 so they don't do college like they do in the UK (or so I believe)

Not quite sure how it would work with them finishing GCSEs then coming here.

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8 hours ago, Lavers said:

Hi Ben

Regarding your child, they don't leave school here until they around 17 so they don't do college like they do in the UK (or so I believe)

Not quite sure how it would work with them finishing GCSEs then coming here.

Quite right, foreign country different structure. The key thing is for a kid to be in Australia to be able to enrol in year 11 - which is the year that they have just turned 16 or are just about to turn 16 (exactly when, depends on the state they are going to). That way they can do the full 2 year course of yrs 11/12.  GCSEs mean diddly squat in Australia but if there is a likelihood that the kids will be returning to UK (temporary visa etc) then they would be better waiting until A levels are finished.  Always a risk to change systems towards the end of a school career and people tend to forget that Australia isn't England with respect to education.   Some states have a college system for 11/12 but most have those as the last 2 years of HS.

On a temporary visa, too, in some states, the cost of sending a child to the latter years of HS can get quite expensive.

Edited by Quoll
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