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jameserob

Positive Skills Assessment - Urgent Help

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Can anyone help me? It’s just been announced that it’s likely all 482 occupations on the short term list will be eligible for pathway to PR if you were in Australia during the pandemic. I’m sponsored as a Recruitment Consultant and I have over 9 years experience in the role, however I have no qualification. The VETAASSES website is saying you need a minimum Bachelor Degree in a relevant field. If you don’t have a relevant Degree, then any Degree will count as long as you have 1 years experience on top of that. This is absolutely crazy. So someone with an unrelated Degree such as Islamic studies, and 1 years work experience in Recruitment is eligible for PR in my occupation, but me who has over 9 years experience is not. Can someone help and advise me if there’s any way around this? 

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Australia wants highly skilled and highly educated immigrants.

It has no obligation to offer you a visa just because you want one and you've lived here for a while, you need to be eligible like everyone else.

In some professions (useful ones like plumbing) the qualifications don't explicitly require a degree but your job doesn't really fit into that "key-worker" definition

Go to university would be one option do the course you referred to and then you'll be able to stay...

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In some occupations, you can apply to have years of experience recognized as equivalent to a degree.  So for instance, they might recognise 6 years' experience as being equivalent to a degree and then you still have 3 years to claim as experience.   I have no idea whether that applies to your field or not, but worth checking.  

However as I'm sure you've encountered in your work, it's not unusual for people with degrees to be valued above people with real experience in a field.  

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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So far it’s just press announcements. What they are suggesting is that any 482 concessions will be primarily for those working in health, hospitality and the regions.  The devil will, as always, be in the detail. 


____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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23 hours ago, Ausvisitor said:

Australia wants highly skilled and highly educated immigrants.

It has no obligation to offer you a visa just because you want one and you've lived here for a while, you need to be eligible like everyone else.

In some professions (useful ones like plumbing) the qualifications don't explicitly require a degree but your job doesn't really fit into that "key-worker" definition

Go to university would be one option do the course you referred to and then you'll be able to stay...

Wow, such a kind response. Do you think it’s right that someone with a Bachelor Degree in Islamic Studies (a Degree which is completely unrelated to my sponsored occupation, Recruitment Consultant) along with just 1 years experience, would be eligible to pass the Positive Skills Test and get PR over me, someone who has worked in Recruitment for nearly 10 years in both the U.K. and Australia, and has been through promotions and works in a managerial position? If myself and this person were put in the same office, I’d be teaching them, yet they’re deemed as more “qualified”.
 

Your response was horrible. I was asking for help in what is an extremely difficult and unfair situation. There are thousands and thousands of migrants out here in similar situations. As for your comment about me going to University, why would I pay $90,000 to do this when a Degree in recruitment doesn’t even exist?! That’s how crazy it is. I wouldn’t risk it anyway, as the way migration works out here they would probably change the goal posts again. Your response was extremely nasty and condescending. There are extremely experienced and qualified migrants who have lived out here for over 13 years, yet due to the constant changing of the goal posts, they still don’t have PR. It’s playing with peoples mental health. People have given a lot to the country and and made their home here. How can you tell someone that their skills aren’t needed when you’ve given them a visa for 4 years? Or even worse allowed them to work in an occupation for over 10 years? There’s many, many people stuck in this situation and it’s disgusting. Australia is an incredible and beautiful country, but migrants are treated appallingly. Have some respect. 

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1 hour ago, jameserob said:

There are extremely experienced and qualified migrants who have lived out here for over 13 years, yet due to the constant changing of the goal posts, they still don’t have PR. It’s playing with peoples mental health.

I have every sympathy with people who are highly experienced and who miss out on jobs because some greenhorn with a degree is valued above them.  Seen it happen often and it's unfair.  However, I have no sympathy with anyone who's been living in Australia on temp visas for 13 years.  Let's be honest, by the time anyone has been living in Australia on temp visas for 5 or 6 years, they know full well that they've got no chance they'll ever get PR.  If they think otherwise, they're living on dreams.  So if they decide to stay on precarious temp visas, it's 100% their choice to put themselves in that situation.   Unless they're from a war-torn third-world country, they could go home any time. 

 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 27/11/2021 at 05:07, jameserob said:

Wow, such a kind response. Do you think it’s right that someone with a Bachelor Degree in Islamic Studies (a Degree which is completely unrelated to my sponsored occupation, Recruitment Consultant) along with just 1 years experience, would be eligible to pass the Positive Skills Test and get PR over me, someone who has worked in Recruitment for nearly 10 years in both the U.K. and Australia, and has been through promotions and works in a managerial position? If myself and this person were put in the same office, I’d be teaching them, yet they’re deemed as more “qualified”.
 

Your response was horrible. I was asking for help in what is an extremely difficult and unfair situation. There are thousands and thousands of migrants out here in similar situations. As for your comment about me going to University, why would I pay $90,000 to do this when a Degree in recruitment doesn’t even exist?! That’s how crazy it is. I wouldn’t risk it anyway, as the way migration works out here they would probably change the goal posts again. Your response was extremely nasty and condescending. There are extremely experienced and qualified migrants who have lived out here for over 13 years, yet due to the constant changing of the goal posts, they still don’t have PR. It’s playing with peoples mental health. People have given a lot to the country and and made their home here. How can you tell someone that their skills aren’t needed when you’ve given them a visa for 4 years? Or even worse allowed them to work in an occupation for over 10 years? There’s many, many people stuck in this situation and it’s disgusting. Australia is an incredible and beautiful country, but migrants are treated appallingly. Have some respect. 

The visa rules were the same when you first came as they are now (that you needed a degree for PR in your role)

So really you are just angry at the process and have gotten upset at me highlighting the fact that in Australia's eyes you aren't wanted unless you have a degree (in your role).

It's not fair but it is a fact

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On 27/11/2021 at 16:46, Marisawright said:

I have every sympathy with people who are highly experienced and who miss out on jobs because some greenhorn with a degree is valued above them.  Seen it happen often and it's unfair.  However, I have no sympathy with anyone who's been living in Australia on temp visas for 13 years.  Let's be honest, by the time anyone has been living in Australia on temp visas for 5 or 6 years, they know full well that they've got no chance they'll ever get PR.  If they think otherwise, they're living on dreams.  So if they decide to stay on precarious temp visas, it's 100% their choice to put themselves in that situation.   Unless they're from a war-torn third-world country, they could go home any time. 

 

Luckily my son who was affected by the retrospective overnight visa changes by the labor government to correctly lodged student visa applications for PR, did stick it out on a temporary bridging visa for 31/2 years, after studying up to a masters degree for 3 years, He  did get PR. it took 61/2 years on a temporary  visa of insecurity with not much chance  to gain PR,. So people do stay here on temporary visas for a long time, hoping possibly unrealistically to gain PR.

I appreciate that the  OP sadly  might not be in a position to get PR, and it’s ok to to point out that PR is not possible, but there was nothing wrong in him reaching out to seek any help, and it never hurts to show understanding to someone’s situation,  when offering advice. 

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On 26/11/2021 at 13:10, Ausvisitor said:

Australia wants highly skilled and highly educated immigrants.

It has no obligation to offer you a visa just because you want one and you've lived here for a while, you need to be eligible like everyone else.

In some professions (useful ones like plumbing) the qualifications don't explicitly require a degree but your job doesn't really fit into that "key-worker" definition

Go to university would be one option do the course you referred to and then you'll be able to stay...

Well actually many are not that highly skilled that gain entry. At the same time others are in roles well under their qualification and many are treated appallingly. Some may call modern day slaves with little opportunity to rectify their situation. 

Such an outcome is bound to result with turbo immigration that has been the policy over the past several years. Certain lobby groups with a direct influence on government have an over influence on policy to which by all appearances little can be done. 

But university while a key recruitment ground of our immigration policy (back door immigration) does not ensure the best by any means , but such measures does ensure a brake on wage growth and an over 'educated' work force doing more manual tasks which would be less likely to be accepted by home grown degree holders. 

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2 hours ago, Blue Flu said:

Well actually many are not that highly skilled that gain entry. At the same time others are in roles well under their qualification and many are treated appallingly. Some may call modern day slaves with little opportunity to rectify their situation. 

I think you're talking about temporary visa holders, who are bound to their employers, not PR holders?   Temporary visa holders are not migrants, they are in Australia for a work contract.  It's regrettable that people refer to them as migrants as it encourages the myth that their temp visa is a solid pathway to permanency, and they are therefore willing to put up with bad conditions and poor pay because they naively think it's a means to an end.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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3 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I think you're talking about temporary visa holders, who are bound to their employers, not PR holders?   Temporary visa holders are not migrants, they are in Australia for a work contract.  It's regrettable that people refer to them as migrants as it encourages the myth that their temp visa is a solid pathway to permanency, and they are therefore willing to put up with bad conditions and poor pay because they naively think it's a means to an end.

No not only temps actually. Australia has been running a rather low skilled immigration program for some time. Many recruited for their 'expertise' ended up working in low skilled areas , often through no fault of their own. There just wasn't the need or nobody would employ them in so termed areas of expertise. Just how many taxi drivers were engineers and so forth ? 

The program does not insist the person supposedly filling  in a position where shortages are said to be, to actually have a job prior to landing., 

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