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Looking to emigrate - have a double glazing business in the uk


nikki 678

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Hi there,

 

we are only at the early stages of looking into emigrating- any info gratefully received . We have a run a double glazing (supply & install only) not manufacturing. Ltd company in the UK for over 5 years . We wish to emigrate and continue to do the same business in Australia . my questions are is this something that is achievable would we meet criteria? we would be starting the business from scratch over there .My husband is 40 this year I am 46 this year. And my son is 23 we all would be working for the family business like we do in the UK. my husband and son supplying and installing the windows. I would deal with all paperwork quotes etc and advertising .If achievable what sort of visa would we all need .would we need to have a certain amount of funds etc?

Or would my husband be able to work for a double glazing company over in Australia ( be sponsored)

Thank you in advance

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Sorry to say houses over here dont have double glazing. Would keep the heat in, in summer and that is the last thing we need, and it does not get cold like the UK in winter. With all your business ability maybe look at using that in a different industry, may be glass replacement. Have a look at the O'Brian web site http://www.obrienglass.com.au/?gclid=CLOPhdiR_LsCFU0ypAod2HYAmA this is a major player in the market of glass replacement out here and might give you some ideas for how you could change your business to suit Australian conditions.

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Very little double glazing there which I do find bizarre - it would actually keep heat out and in the winter the houses get very cold, colder than my UK house ever does. It is growing so maybe actually a good time to get in at the ground floor and make a killing. We wanted double glazing and were quoted $40K!

 

You need to look at business visa's and see if you would qualify http://www.immi.gov.au/Visas/Pages/890.aspx

 

There may be other options within the construction industry for sponsorship as an employee - maybe not double glazing but houses do have windows :) It doesn't sound like that would suit though as your son would definitely not be included. Mind you I don't know whether he could be included on the business visa either.

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Sorry to say houses over here dont have double glazing. Would keep the heat in, in summer

They wouldn't. Especially if glazed with the right glass, they would stop a lot of the heat getting IN in the first place. When it's hot outside, you don't lose any heat from the house through the windows, the reverse is true - GCSE Physics.

 

and that is the last thing we need, and it does not get cold like the UK in winter.

It gets cold enough to heat houses though, in many areas. And a lot of that heat goes straight out of the average Aussie single glazed window. Particularly those awful cheap aluminium framed things that are so prevalent

 

To the OP, Australia is getting there with double glazing (see current building codes) in areas that get colder in winter, but it's not the norm. Which you could see as a market opportunity, but you might equally see as a tough sell

 

There are people here who are involved with the building industry who might know better than most what the state of play is. Might try a PM to Eera??

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AFAIK all the window installers in this part of Australia (Tasmania) supply double glazing. It is becoming standard in new builds here and many people are also retrofitting. I can only see this growing as the cost of energy increases...both for heating and cooling, regardless of the location.

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AFAIK all the window installers in this part of Australia (Tasmania) supply double glazing. It is becoming standard in new builds here and many people are also retrofitting. I can only see this growing as the cost of energy increases...both for heating and cooling, regardless of the location.

Well i have learnt something :-) I really thought it kept the heat in. Hum how interesting

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Well i have learnt something :-) I really thought it kept the heat in. Hum how interesting

 

Well, basically it's a barrier. If the heat is produced inside the house (as in winter) then it stops it getting out. If the heat is being produced outside the house, it stops it getting in.

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Whatever visa you go for it is unlikely you son will be included as a dependent if he is working. There could be ways round this as it may be possible to sponsor him from your existing business in the UK.

 

i think it would be well worth consulting a good agent to explore the options, expect to pay for good advice. As there could be several options here it would be worth it, even if you just clarify the visa to go for and then do it yourself.

 

rules change all the time so you need to look at current options on immi.gov.au

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Well, basically it's a barrier. If the heat is produced inside the house (as in winter) then it stops it getting out. If the heat is being produced outside the house, it stops it getting in.

 

Two pieces of glass with a vacuum (or inert gas) between them so same idea as a Thermos flask and yes, becoming more common here also as a sound insulator but silly prices at the moment.

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Well when we built our house in the Adelaide Hills we had extra insulation and DG. The developer raised eyebrows and sucked teeth but in the end it didn't cost that much more (the frames were better quality too). That was 5 years ago and more houses are being built with DG. In Tas it is compulsory in new builds.

Basically they are behind the times, new build properties throughout Europe have had DG for many years, even those where temperatures reach 40 degrees. I have seen more solar panels in Lancashire than SA too.

 

we haven't lived in our house yet but tenants have commented on how economical it is to heat/cool. Never mind the sound insulation from the neighbours cockerel !

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It shocked me 15 years ago and shocked me again three months ago how badly insulated Australian properties are - even the one we were staying in which was approx. 5 years old. 6'c at night in Adelaide felt like a -6'c morning in England. So I'd say go for it - you'd be stealing a march in many ways... But as stated above, you'd need to say if you are able to obtain a business visa etc.

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Two pieces of glass with a vacuum (or inert gas) between them so same idea as a Thermos flask and yes, becoming more common here also as a sound insulator but silly prices at the moment.

 

You talk about a "gas" how would it go in a bush fire ? very interested to understand the benifits and disadvantages in the Aus climate.

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You talk about a "gas" how would it go in a bush fire ? very interested to understand the benifits and disadvantages in the Aus climate.

 

Inert gas, usually Argon. As it is inert it is non-reactive, non-flammable, non-explosive. It's also not very conductive of heat which is why it is used.

 

I don't think there are any disadvantages, except cost. As mentioned above, all double glazing will do (thermally) is reduce heat transfer from teh hotter side of the window to the colder side of the window. So it will reduce heat transferring in from outside when it's hotter outside than in (like on a hot summer day), and reduce heat transferring out when it's warmer inside than out (like on a cold winter night)

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Inert gas, usually Argon. As it is inert it is non-reactive, non-flammable, non-explosive. It's also not very conductive of heat which is why it is used.

 

I don't think there are any disadvantages, except cost. As mentioned above, all double glazing will do (thermally) is reduce heat transfer from teh hotter side of the window to the colder side of the window. So it will reduce heat transferring in from outside when it's hotter outside than in (like on a hot summer day), and reduce heat transferring out when it's warmer inside than out (like on a cold winter night)

Thanks that is really informative. As these heat waves get worse people might start looking at DG, just like in the UK where it is oviously used to keep heat in

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, just like in the UK where it is oviously used to keep heat in

 

In the main - yes, but we overlook that it does keep our houses cooler (along with such things as cavity wall) on the 12 hot/warm days of summer too. Last year when it was 34'c (yes!) I recall opening the front door and thinking to myself "its nice and cool in here"...

 

Not only that, the noise too. Friends of ours purchased a house in Melbourne along a busy road. (£300,000 for a two bedroom place, but that's another story) Noise 24/7, when I said "what about double glazing" they collapsed in laughter and then admitted that "it would be handy"..

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In the main - yes, but we overlook that it does keep our houses cooler (along with such things as cavity wall) on the 12 hot/warm days of summer too. Last year when it was 34'c (yes!) I recall opening the front door and thinking to myself "its nice and cool in here"...

 

Not only that, the noise too. Friends of ours purchased a house in Melbourne along a busy road. (£300,000 for a two bedroom place, but that's another story) Noise 24/7, when I said "what about double glazing" they collapsed in laughter and then admitted that "it would be handy"..

 

12 hot days a year ? Where Aus or UK ? We are now on our 7th day of Mid 40s that is 111F ! Last night it was still 33C at midnight.

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In the main - yes, but we overlook that it does keep our houses cooler (along with such things as cavity wall) on the 12 hot/warm days of summer too. Last year when it was 34'c (yes!) I recall opening the front door and thinking to myself "its nice and cool in here"...

 

Not only that, the noise too. Friends of ours purchased a house in Melbourne along a busy road. (£300,000 for a two bedroom place, but that's another story) Noise 24/7, when I said "what about double glazing" they collapsed in laughter and then admitted that "it would be handy"..

 

 

Noise reduction would be a big seller, as the houses are built so close together now. If you have a bedroom next to your neighbours air con unit and they run it all night, you won't get much sleep.

 

Plus savings on the electricity, as it would make air con more effective.

 

Plus security. Much harder to get through a doubled glazed window than a single.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Hi there,

 

we are only at the early stages of looking into emigrating- any info gratefully received . We have a run a double glazing (supply & install only) not manufacturing. Ltd company in the UK for over 5 years . We wish to emigrate and continue to do the same business in Australia . my questions are is this something that is achievable would we meet criteria? we would be starting the business from scratch over there .My husband is 40 this year I am 46 this year. And my son is 23 we all would be working for the family business like we do in the UK. my husband and son supplying and installing the windows. I would deal with all paperwork quotes etc and advertising .If achievable what sort of visa would we all need .would we need to have a certain amount of funds etc?

Or would my husband be able to work for a double glazing company over in Australia ( be sponsored)

Thank you in advance

 

You will not go wrong if you decide to move. It will be hard to establish business reputation but your skill will be in demand. I have double glazed uPVC window manufacturing company in Adelaide and we have clear increase in output year on year. Starting from scratch is never easy but if you are skilled there will be always employers willing to give you a chance. Business or 457 visa is probably the fastest way to emigrate.

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