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bearnova64

Questions on securing a Visa to move to Australia from UK

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My Australian girlfriend(she born there) and I ( I am born in England) wish to move permanently to Australia and marry there. I have 4 questions please

1) From when we commence the paperwork to apply roughly how long a time period from start to end does it take to get a decision?

2) If we are approved then is there a time window from the date of approval we would need to make the move to Australia, or is it open ended?

3) Once we move to Australia I assume there is a time window we need to marry within on arrival?

4) What is the rough cost in UK pounds to do the visa process?

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Posted (edited)

No 1 & 4. This information can be found on the Home Affairs website.
For example: https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/prospective-marriage-300 or you may want to see: https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/partner-onshore

3 - If you get a Subclass 300 you will have upto 9 - 15 months - Information is on the above link.

Edited by JetBlast

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Assuming you are applying for partner/defacto  visa- cost approx  £4500 for application plus approx £300 for medical/police checks.  Approval time were very quick compared to normal - not of what they are like currently but my wifes visa was granted last August, only waited approx 3 months for decision - but it was a straightforward case - we have been married 10+ years, have 2 children.If visa is granted you will have 1 year to activate it - ie enter the country. The main thing with your application - given that you are not married will be to provide evidence that you are and have been in a genuine relationship.

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You have two choices.  

If you have already been living together for a couple of years, then you can apply for a partner visa (309).  Currently those are being granted within a few months, as Talktosi says.  

If you have not been living together like man and wife, then it is more complicated, and also more expensive, because you will have to pay for two visas.  First you will need to apply for a Prospective Marriage Visa (300).   That will allow you to travel to Australia and stay for between 9 and 15 months. During that period you must get married, and then you can apply for an onshore partner visa (800) which will allow you to remain in Australia.  Jetblast has sent you the links to both those visas.

 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Sorry I should have clarified we have been living together in the UK for 3 years, so given this we would apply for the partner visa(309) and if this is granted we have 1 year to move to Australia and once there we can get married in a time frame to suit us?

 

In the unlikely event we decided not to get married once we arrived in Australia this is not a condition of being granted the visa (ie to get married?)

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11 minutes ago, bearnova64 said:

Sorry I should have clarified we have been living together in the UK for 3 years, so given this we would apply for the partner visa(309) and if this is granted we have 1 year to move to Australia and once there we can get married in a time frame to suit us?

 

In the unlikely event we decided not to get married once we arrived in Australia this is not a condition of being granted the visa (ie to get married?)

There is no need to get married at all if you get the 309 visa. 

Australia recognises a de facto relationship as being the equivalent of marriage 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Thanks Marisa Wright and I assume ages of the 2 parties are irrelevant in if a 309 is granted? I ask as I am in my 50s and my girlfriend is in her 30s.

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8 hours ago, bearnova64 said:

Thanks Marisa Wright and I assume ages of the 2 parties are irrelevant in if a 309 is granted? I ask as I am in my 50s and my girlfriend is in her 30s.

Yes, ages are irrelevant for the visa.  

I should mention that there are two stages to the partner visa. The first is the 309, which is temporary.  After a couple of years, you can apply for the 100 permanent visa.  Basically, it's a safeguard to be sure couples are genuine and not getting married just  to get a visa.  

On another subject, do consider the wisdom of moving to Australia at your age, assuming you are still working.  Age discrimination is rampant in in the workforce here.   I know so many people (including me!) who "took early retirement" in their mid-fifties, which is a euphemism for not being able to find a job or being made redundant.  I have to say, I just assumed it was the same all over the world, but when I spent a year in the UK in 2015, i was astonished how different the attitude was there.  You would be wise to budget for an extended period of unemployment when you arrive, as it may take you a while to get a job.  Depending on your occupation, you may also need to check whether your qualifications will be recognised here.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

Yes, ages are irrelevant for the visa.  

I should mention that there are two stages to the partner visa. The first is the 309, which is temporary.  After a couple of years, you can apply for the 100 permanent visa.  Basically, it's a safeguard to be sure couples are genuine and not getting married just  to get a visa.  

On another subject, do consider the wisdom of moving to Australia at your age, assuming you are still working.  Age discrimination is rampant in in the workforce here.   I know so many people (including me!) who "took early retirement" in their mid-fifties, which is a euphemism for not being able to find a job or being made redundant.  I have to say, I just assumed it was the same all over the world, but when I spent a year in the UK in 2015, i was astonished how different the attitude was there.  You would be wise to budget for an extended period of unemployment when you arrive, as it may take you a while to get a job.  Depending on your occupation, you may also need to check whether your qualifications will be recognised here.

Also with an older age start in the Australian workforce (if you can get a job) you will have much less time to build up a reasonable retirement income and will likely be working into your 70s or 80s (heaven forbid).  I, too, think it would have been much easier to get a job as a 60 something in UK (I was offered 3 and my DH was offered 2 even though we hadn't put in any applications and couldnt work anyway being carers for an elderly couple). 

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2 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Yes, ages are irrelevant for the visa.  

I should mention that there are two stages to the partner visa. The first is the 309, which is temporary.  After a couple of years, you can apply for the 100 permanent visa.  Basically, it's a safeguard to be sure couples are genuine and not getting married just  to get a visa.  

 

The 100 is normally granted immediately if the applicant and partner have been in a defacto relationship for more than 3 years.

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Any fool can criticize, condemn, and complain but it takes character and self control to be understanding and forgiving.

Dale Carnegie – 1888-1955, Author and Lecturer

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Thanks to everyone for all your very helpful answers and yes Marisa Wright I am well aware for the ageism in the Australian job market but I have enough funds to retire when I move there, although I will look for a part time or charity role to stay busy. Your UK experience was great for you in being offered roles as I know many here who also have suffered ageism on UK job hunting, as it is a problem in many countries sadly.

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