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lbooth

Are migrants discriminated against?

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    On 20/04/2017 at 9:53 PM, ScottieGirl said:

    What do you do? It will vary by sector and it will also depend on whether the hiring manager is an Aussie or a migrant which again will vary by sector.

    I agree with this.   Before retirement I was an HR manager for a government department, and because I had found it so very hard to get a job when we first arrived in 1991, I always tried to give any new migrants a chance, even if it was just a casual/temporary role, just so they could prove themselves and at least notch up a bit of "Australian Experience" as so many employers seem fixated on this and not on who is the better person for the job.

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    ......Just trying to be helpful so don't shoot me down if my personal views do not coincide with yours! :animal-dog:

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    11 minutes ago, Rossmoyne said:

    I agree with this.   Before retirement I was an HR manager for a government department, and because I had found it so very hard to get a job when we first arrived in 1991, I always tried to give any new migrants a chance, even if it was just a casual/temporary role, just so they could prove themselves and at least notch up a bit of "Australian Experience" as so many employers seem fixated on this and not on who is the better person for the job.

    How are "American Experience" and "American" education viewed?

    Edited by westwoodwizard

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    3 hours ago, westwoodwizard said:

    And why did things change so much in Australia in terms of the economy that it sounds pretty much like the United States? Same issues of stagnant wages, layoffs, increase in part time labor while decreasing full time labor, etc? I thought that is what made Australia different is the country's attitudes of wanting a better overall society versus everybody just chasing after the Almighty Dollar.

    Globalisation and technology. It is no longer possible to force people in Australia to pay higher prices for something you can buy overseas much cheaper. This not only applies to retail items like clothes and books it also applies to the workforce.  Many jobs can be done much cheaper by offshoring them in Asia.

    The Australian car industry ultimately collapsed because Australians didn't buy enough Australian made cars. Subsidies to make them cheaper don't help if people don't buy them.

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    7 hours ago, ali said:

    I think QLD must have been difficult for a few years, my colleague who is Australian and trained (nursing) in Aus went to QLD with her partner and was unable to find any work other than casual shifts with an agency - she had to return to WA after less than a year

    I agree Qld Health have closed the door on jobs especially the overseas applicants they once encouraged. I think there is too many people competing for few jobs in the south east corner and more chance if you go regional.

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    8 hours ago, westwoodwizard said:

    How are "American Experience" and "American" education viewed?

    As not Australian which means most Aussies and Brits for that matter will be unfamiliar with what you have done.

    Not long after I first arrived I had to recruit an analyst. It was the late nineties and the dot com boom meant quality applicants were in short supply. I interviewed a chap who had a relevant degree but no experience in the sector. He was articulate and personable so I hired him. I  remember during the interview he was keen to impress on me his educational achievements and I realised I had no idea what he was talking about, the terminology was completely  foreign. He was an Aussie,  I  am a Brit. I just listened politely. 

    We become friends and just before I left last month we went to lunch and he thanked me for hiring him. It was a turning point in his career as it allowed him to break into a completely new area. He subsequently did very well which in retrospect is unsurprising as it turns what he had been so keen to tell me meant he was top of his class in maths and in the top 5 for the state!

     

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    19 hours ago, Quoll said:

    The skills list has nothing to do with the availability of jobs unfortunately.  There are still some professions on the list where competition for jobs is quite fierce. If the lists were a more accurate picture of job availability I daresay there would be less antagonism. 

    Too many labour under the assumption, (naturally enough) that the skills list equates a shortage, equates areas of skill shortages. People abroad of course would have no idea of the fallacy of this. Thankfully more at home are waking up to this fact as well.

    It does beg the question just who is calling the shots in this process. No prizes for correct answers though, I'm afraid. All too easy. The attacks by mainstream media on the recent changes (which go nowhere near enough) in removing two hundred 'skill positions' from a remaining over weighty list goes some way in explaining.....just where business interests lay. Not in the interest of the majority living at present in this country for sure.

     

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    17 hours ago, ScottieGirl said:

    Globalisation and technology. It is no longer possible to force people in Australia to pay higher prices for something you can buy overseas much cheaper. This not only applies to retail items like clothes and books it also applies to the workforce.  Many jobs can be done much cheaper by offshoring them in Asia.

    The Australian car industry ultimately collapsed because Australians didn't buy enough Australian made cars. Subsidies to make them cheaper don't help if people don't buy them.

    Australia due to its geographical location is exceptionally hard pressed to compete in an area of low wages and conditions. It is not only Australia, but as can be noted has come to the for front of American politics as well. EU countries have long felt a move of business eastwards with the dismantling of the Iron Curtain. Britain, even being a largely low wage paying nation has seen a lot of its industry diminish.

    No wonder globalisation is increasingly being challenged as being passed its time and indeed a threat to living standards of the majority while favouring off shore business and multi nationals.

    No wonder the smaller anti globalisation parties of both Right and Left are gaining ever more support, challenging the status quo and old order.

    Of course there is no guarantee that importing from abroad will remain cheaper. China is already losing out to cheaper countries as prices there rise.

    The resulting instability will and is asking serious questions with regards globalisation. It is safe to say it will likely meet the same fate as the previous obsession pre WW1 and retreat. The price called on for this to happen though could be extremely high.

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    On ‎21‎/‎04‎/‎2017 at 0:50 PM, Toots said:

    I never personally came across any discrimination in the workplace and I happily worked alongside Aussies and migrants from China, India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka and other migrant Brits.  We all must have come across at our job interview as the best person for the job.

    If only job interviews were so cut and dry. Best person for the job? Depends on a lot of variables, I'm afraid. For instance it could be whom the interviewer would prefer to work alongside, has the prettiest face, is known to them, friend of a friend, prefer a likely more passive 'Asian' person even, or someone on a 457 that will be 'under the thumb' of management for x number of years. Basically a whole cohort of reasons why the 'best person' in performing the task will not be picked.

    Another reason being too many interviewers are simply not skilled enough to conduct an interview (known a few) making a mockery of the entire process.  

     

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    ^^^^^^

    Perhaps Pura Vida but we were interviewed by 3 different people at different times.  No matter - anyway we all got on with the job and each other and received a bonus each year so we must have been doing something right.  I did notice after being there a few years a psychology test was part of the interview process.  My God some of the duds who passed that were totally useless.  No idea if that idea is still being used at interviews these days.

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    On 18/04/2017 at 20:51, lbooth said:

    Hi

    My partner and I are looking to emigrate in the next year but worried with the recent visa changes that even if we do get granted a visa, we wont find work as employers will favour an Australian candidate (of a lower standard - obviously not looking for preferential treatment!). 

    Has anyone had experience of this kind of discrimination or am I just being paranoid?

    Cheers :)

    I wouldn't use the word "Paranoid" but in a big city with as many immigrants as there are locals it's hard to imagine any firm preferring "Australians" (and whatever that means it does not mean white Australians.) My government office is a United Nations as are most parts of Sydney. On the train to Parramatta it's the same as my office. It's possible that in a small town you might find a culture of "locals first" but most employers just want the best person.

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