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GlindaWanderer

Relocating from UK - Temporary Skills Shortage Visa Help

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Hi all, newbie here 🙋‍♀️

My husband has been offered a job in Brisbane and we have been told he will be put forward for a 482 Temporary Skills Shortage Visa however I can't find much info online from people who've gone over on this Visa and I have a million questions!

The main issues that are giving me the greatest cause for concern are the criminal history and medical checks.  My husband was convicted of drink driving (twice) about 20 years ago, both resulted in bans/fines.  Since then he went through the process of reobtaining his licence and has never had any other issues and doesn't even drink now and hasn't done for about 12 years.  I have been told by a friend who emigrated to Australia years ago (who happens to be a police officer) that it is unlikely to prevent the Visa from going through but I wondered if anybody else has any experience of this and how it impacted the process?  I've seen various posts about it causing a delay as they 'look at you harder' but I've no idea what that means.

With regard to the medicals, I'm not aware of any issues for my husband although he does smoke and hasn't been to the doctors for many years so I suppose that's a good thing really!  However, I suffer with severe anxiety and have been seeing a doctor for help with this for quite a long time (about 9 years on and off).  I am wondering if this will be considered something that could result in the Visa not being granted as I gather that the main point of the checks are to ensure you won't be a drain on the economy over there and that you aren't a risk to anybody.  Again, if anybody has any experience of this I'd really appreciate some advice.  As an aside I'm also VERY overweight so am really panicking about that and have resolved to try to lose some weight before the medical but I'm not certain how far along the Visa process the medicals happen - can anybody clarify?

The employer who is sponsoring my husband has said there will be a caseworker assigned to him to work through the Visa process so I know that all of these questions (and lots more) will be directed to them once that happens but I've got myself into a bit of a state panicking about it all and worrying that I'll be the reason he doesn't get to go to a job he really wants.  We also have a 9 year old son and we would all dearly love to make the most of this opportunity but I feel like I don't want to get too excited about it if there is a good chance the Visa will be denied.

Thanks so much if you've bothered to read this and got all the way through - I'm not sure if I'm posting in the right place so apologies in advance if not 🙄😅

Kerrie

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Your anxiety shouldn't be an issue for the medical. Are you on treatment?

I'd suggest maybe resolve to lose weight for yourself and your son rather than for something ultimately outside your control. If your very obese then your son likely won't have a mum to love for as long as he might and you might not see all the joys in his growing up.

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Thanks!  I have been prescribed medication but I haven't taken anything for almost two years as I don't like being on tablets and try to manage without.  I totally understand your point about the weight - to clarify I was even bigger and have already lost 3 stone but have a lot more to lose and with the way the last year has gone I've definitely stalled in my efforts.  The reality of this huge opportunity has definitely made me realise I need to get it back under control and push on, for lots of reasons, but ultimately a move to Australia is a chance for a new life for all of us and we believe it would be hugely beneficial for our son hence why I'd feel awful if I was the reason it all went wrong!

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May I suggest that you consult a registered migration for an assessment of your case and do not rely entirely on advice from a party representing a prospective employer?


Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, GlindaWanderer said:

My husband has been offered a job in Brisbane and we have been told he will be put forward for a 482 Temporary Skills Shortage Visa however I can't find much info online from people who've gone over on this Visa and I have a million questions!

Just to clarify, this is a great opportunity for your son to have an adventure in another country but it is NOT migrating.  A 482 allows you to live in Australia while your husband is working for that company, and it only lasts 2 to 4 years.  Then you must all go home.

The company may have mentioned that once he has worked there for 3 or 4 years, he can transition to a permanent visa and you can stay forever.  That's not strictly true. The truth is that there's a possibility that he might be able to apply for a permanent visa, if the rules haven't changed by then (which they do, often) and if he's still eligible. It can take a year or more, during which you're in limbo wondering where your future lies, and there is no guarantee his application would be successful. I would not recommend anyone with anxiety issues even contemplate it, because the chances of success are low and it's very stressful.

 

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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8 hours ago, GlindaWanderer said:

The employer who is sponsoring my husband has said there will be a caseworker assigned to him to work through the Visa process so I know that all of these questions (and lots more) will be directed to them once that happens

Your ‘case worker’ will be the Departmental official who decides your visa application... they may ask you for information and clarification but will not ‘work through’ the process with you and will not answer any questions you have. As Westley says, I suggest you get some professional advice. It may also be quite some time before they restart processing 482 visas for offshore applicants. 


____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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@GlindaWanderer, Paul makes a good point.   If it's the employer who assigns the case worker, then that person is an agent being paid by the employer, and their advice will be for the good of the employer, not your husband. 

For instance, like I said, it is possible (in theory) to come to Australia on a temporary 482 visa and eventually get a permanent visa, with the help of the employer. But it's far from easy and definitely not guaranteed.  The employer (and their agents) are likely to be positive and upbeat about the process, whereas an agent who's working for you is going to give you a more honest assessment of your chances.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Hi everyone, thanks so much for your replies - a whole lot to process and digest.  

Can anybody recommend migration specialists in the UK that I could reach out to for some help?

Also, following these comments we have done some more research and have looked at the possibility of a 186 permanent residency visa (direct application) which could still be employer sponsored but would take the uncertainty away before we uproot everything and move from the UK.  Does anybody have any further information on this and is that even an option?  I should also say that my husband is 43 (turns 44 in November 2021) and from everything we've read it looks like even on a medium term TSS you can only apply for residency after 3 years and must be under 45 when you do, which means that is out the window as well!

Thanks again 🙂

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, GlindaWanderer said:

Can anybody recommend migration specialists in the UK that I could reach out to for some help?

Also, following these comments we have done some more research and have looked at the possibility of a 186 permanent residency visa (direct application) which could still be employer sponsored but would take the uncertainty away before we uproot everything and move from the UK.  Does anybody have any further information on this and is that even an option?  I should also say that my husband is 43 (turns 44 in November 2021) and from everything we've read it looks like even on a medium term TSS you can only apply for residency after 3 years and must be under 45 when you do, which means that is out the window as well!

Thanks again 🙂

Suncoast Migration (Paul Hand, who posted above) is in the UK. +44 20 7183 9829

Yes, the 186 is an option but it will depend if the employer is willing to go for it. It takes longer to be processed, and the employer may not be willing to wait that long.  They're more likely to push for him to take the 482 now, to get him out there and working.   But you're right, your husband's age is a problem because the cutoff is 45 except in exceptional circumstances.   That makes professional advice even more crucial.

Good luck

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Thanks so much @Marisawright I'll message Paul and a few others to see what the costs for advice are as we're on a tight budget as it is and the relocation package is not quite as generous as we'd originally been told (last year pre covid).  I appreciate you taking the time to respond to my questions as it helps to get advice from people who've actually been through and/or understand as trying to make sense of what you find online is tricky and the employer doesn't seem to have done much research and are assuming it's all the same as it was for the 457 visa as they've relocated people before but prior to the changes in 2018 I think.  Saying that my husband has emailed them with his concerns and suggested the 186 so we'll see what they come back with - at least if it's an outright no we know we have to make the decision on what's on offer.

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14 minutes ago, GlindaWanderer said:

...we're on a tight budget as it is and the relocation package is not quite as generous as we'd originally been told ...

the employer doesn't seem to have done much research and are assuming it's all the same as it was for the 457 visa as they've relocated people before 

Relocation packages have become less and less generous in recent years I'm afraid.  I think employers take advantage of the fact that so many people are willing to pay the costs themselves, betting on the fact that they'll get permanency in the end. Sadly we've also had members who didn't succeed, and ended up back in the UK homeless four years later, having spent most of the equity from their original UK home in relocating. So it's important to do your budget carefully.

Transitioning from the 457 to a permanent visa was somewhat easier, and in those days the age cutoff was 50.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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@Marisawright I can imagine you're right - I think relocating to somewhere like Australia is a dream for a lot of people so most are willing to absorb costs to get themselves there! We don't have a lot of cash in the UK so to use up what we do have is a big risk for us hence why I'm trying to get as much info as possible to make an informed decision.  Part of me wants to just take what they offer to get out there and hope it all works out but it's hard to do that when you have a little one and his life and education have to come first.  I know you've recommended Paul for the migration advice but just wondering is it best to have a UK based expert rather than one in Australia?  There are lots out there and I want to make sure we are going down the right route!  All of this is obviously a massive 'if' anyway as I'm still concerned about my husband's DD convictions and my medical issues as they could prevent us even getting the Visa so it's a lot to take in and process but I am a detail-oriented person so feel calmer once I have a lot of information to draw from.  Anyway, thanks again for all your help and advice, it really does help and is much appreciated.

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14 minutes ago, GlindaWanderer said:

.... Part of me wants to just take what they offer to get out there and hope it all works out.....

Please, please don't do that!  People imagine that if they can just get into Australia, more visa options magically appear. They don't.  The visas that are available from the UK are the same ones available in Australia.  They don't give you extra credit for already being in the country.  And you'll lose valuable time getting the 482, and then you might be too late to get a permanent visa due to your husband's age.

I think you should take it one step at a time.    Find out if permanent migration is even possible, given your concerns about health and convictions and your husband's age.  If it isn't, then that may settle everything.  While the 482, on its own, would give you a great opportunity to have a few years' adventure in Australia while your son's still at primary school, it's not going to be financially viable if the company isn't going to pay for your relocation costs there and back. 

Paul's company has its main offices in the UK and also has offices in Queensland.  

 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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18 minutes ago, GlindaWanderer said:

I know you've recommended Paul for the migration advice but just wondering is it best to have a UK based expert rather than one in Australia?  There are lots out there and I want to make sure we are going down the right route! 

If you use a Registered Migration Agent and they are active in the type of visa you are interested in, then it’s a matter of personal choice whether you want to deal with someone locally or on the other side of the world. Offshore RMAs are just as qualified as onshore ones. Many UK based clients have good experiences with Aus based agents, my clients prefer to have someone that is easy to speak with in UK hours. If I get enquiries that are better handled by someone onshore, I will make a referral. 


____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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59 minutes ago, GlindaWanderer said:

Saying that my husband has emailed them with his concerns and suggested the 186 so we'll see what they come back with - at least if it's an outright no we know we have to make the decision on what's on offer.

The 186 is a different ball game. It has a different, shorter skills list than the 482. If your occupation is on this list, you would also need to obtain a positive skills assessment, which is usually not required for a 482. 

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____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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6 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

They don't give you extra credit for already being in the country.  

This is true ... but if you have onshore work experience and/or have studied in Aus, then you can score points that are not available to applicants who have never lived/worked/studied in Australia. 


____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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6 minutes ago, paulhand said:

This is true ... but if you have onshore work experience and/or have studied in Aus, then you can score points that are not available to applicants who have never lived/worked/studied in Australia. 

True, but it is still possible to calculate what those points would be, before you leave the UK.  I think a lot of people seem to think there are new options to be discovered once you're onshore.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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@paulhand @Marisawright thank you both.

I can see that there are a lot of variables and we need to determine where we stand before going any further.  I think the difficulty for us is that the company has not yet confirmed whether they are looking to put my husband through on a short or medium term TSS and we don't even know the job title they are using as he works in heat treatment but is going over as a supervisor/manager so it's not exactly clear which occupation that falls under.  I've had a quick look at the 186 list and couldn't honestly say which role he would be classed as so I don't know what type of skills assessment would come into play.  Obviously he's highly skilled in his field but has no official qualifications so it's all a bit vague (from our perspective at least).  I think once we hear back from the employer about how they see the process playing out and their thoughts on the possibility of a 186 visa in the first instance then we will have a clearer picture of what we can achieve.  Paul, I'll drop you an email to discuss fees etc. as I feel whatever they come back with we will need some general advice even though we won't have control over the visa application process as they apparently do it all.  

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30 minutes ago, GlindaWanderer said:

e even though we won't have control over the visa application process as they apparently do it all.  

The employer has to do most of the work for the visa, but there will still be some work needed on your side.  Many people do hire their own agent to be on hand during the process, so they have someone impartial on their side and can be sure the employer is doing the right thing.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, GlindaWanderer said:

@paulhand @Marisawright thank you both.

I can see that there are a lot of variables and we need to determine where we stand before going any further.  I think the difficulty for us is that the company has not yet confirmed whether they are looking to put my husband through on a short or medium term TSS and we don't even know the job title they are using as he works in heat treatment but is going over as a supervisor/manager so it's not exactly clear which occupation that falls under.  I've had a quick look at the 186 list and couldn't honestly say which role he would be classed as so I don't know what type of skills assessment would come into play.  Obviously he's highly skilled in his field but has no official qualifications so it's all a bit vague (from our perspective at least).  I think once we hear back from the employer about how they see the process playing out and their thoughts on the possibility of a 186 visa in the first instance then we will have a clearer picture of what we can achieve.  Paul, I'll drop you an email to discuss fees etc. as I feel whatever they come back with we will need some general advice even though we won't have control over the visa application process as they apparently do it all.  

The cost of some advice will be tiny compared to the cost of moving out there and probably having to move back a few years later.  Even if your flights etc are covered, there’s still many other costs involved.  In my opinion, after reading your comments, advice is vital. Good luck. 

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