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HELP!


Guest Immortal

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Guest Immortal

Hi I'm in need of some advice. I have a wife and 3 young kids(6,4,2) and we have made the decision that we want to move to Australia from the UK. My wife is a housewife and is educated to degree level in creative writing. I finished highschool and went straight into employment but have swapped my job lots of times due to various reasons. I am currently working from home buying and selling cars(I can fix most things on a car but have no formal qualifications). I am also very good with technology.*

 

My question is this. *What is the best way to get permanent residency based on my circumstances? *The last thing I want to do is to train formally in something that may take me 3 years and then either it isn't on the skills list then or I then have to wait another few years to migrate as 5 yrs is a long time.*

 

My skills (although not formally) are casino inspector(5yrs experience), car mechanics (3yrs), photography as a hobby(5yrs+)

 

Any help would be really appreciated.*

 

Matt

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I would suggest waiting to see what the changes actually bring on 1st July. I think even if you did get your mechanics qualifications you may have to work for quite a while before you can apply. The new changes seem to want around 5 of the last 7 years in the occupation plus qualifications. If your wife has a degree she could possibly train to teach as she should be able to "top up" rather than start from scratch. That way she could get employer sponsor quite easily.

 

Not much help but hopefully some food for thought. x

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Guest Immortal

Hi my partner could do her PGCE which would enable her to be a primary school teacher. Would she then still need the 5-7yrs experience??

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Guest Immortal

Hi I tried gomatilda but they wanted to charge for an initial discussion as they said I have no route to visa at the moment. Problem is, I won't until i have advice on what's the best way.

 

Matt

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From what you have described, there may not be an immediate visa route available to you - other than to try and secure company sponsorship on a 457 visa (but this isn't an easy task from the UK either). No one can predict what changes DIAC are likely to make in the future, but it is reasonable to assume that once the changes happen on July 1st it will be some time before the game is changed dramatically again.

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Hi I'm in need of some advice. I have a wife and 3 young kids(6,4,2) and we have made the decision that we want to move to Australia from the UK. My wife is a housewife and is educated to degree level in creative writing. I finished highschool and went straight into employment but have swapped my job lots of times due to various reasons. I am currently working from home buying and selling cars(I can fix most things on a car but have no formal qualifications). I am also very good with technology.*

 

My question is this. *What is the best way to get permanent residency based on my circumstances? *The last thing I want to do is to train formally in something that may take me 3 years and then either it isn't on the skills list then or I then have to wait another few years to migrate as 5 yrs is a long time.*

 

My skills (although not formally) are casino inspector(5yrs experience), car mechanics (3yrs), photography as a hobby(5yrs+)

 

Any help would be really appreciated.*

 

Matt

 

Not every body has a visa option for Australia, so if the last thing you want to do is retrain then I forsee problems ahead.

 

If your OH is a housewife, then it doesn't matter what she has a degree in, she will not qualify for skilled migration. Likewise what you are good at is not relevant, your recent work experience is what matters as all skilled migrants have to demonstrate recent and full time work experience in an occupation on the SOL.

 

I think both of you would struggle to get employer sponsorship in light of your current work situation.

 

So really this just leaves re-training. But you are right, there are risks involved and I think you either need to take that risk or accept that you are not going to be eligible for migration to Australia unless the rules change in your favour. And I don't say that lightly; I always wanted to go to live in the US, for as long as I can remember and I believe it it where I should be. But I have accepted that there is no way in for me and found it is not the end of the world.

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Guest Immortal
Not every body has a visa option for Australia, so if the last thing you want to do is retrain then I forsee problems ahead.

 

If your OH is a housewife, then it doesn't matter what she has a degree in, she will not qualify for skilled migration. Likewise what you are good at is not relevant, your recent work experience is what matters as all skilled migrants have to demonstrate recent and full time work experience in an occupation on the SOL.

 

I think both of you would struggle to get employer sponsorship in light of your current work situation.

 

So really this just leaves re-training. But you are right, there are risks involved and I think you either need to take that risk or accept that you are not going to be eligible for migration to Australia unless the rules change in your favour. And I don't say that lightly; I always wanted to go to live in the US, for as long as I can remember and I believe it it where I should be. But I have accepted that there is no way in for me and found it is not the end of the world.

 

Hi and thanks for replying. Im more than happy to retrain in anything really. I'm quite intelligent and pick things up very easily. Is this idea feasible??....

 

My wife to do her PGCE next year and get another years experience also which will mean she is a fully qualified teacher. Myself retrain in something that is in high demand and on the skills shortage list that will give me a degree. So 3yrs from now I will be educated to degree level, my wife will be a fully qualified teacher. Then we book a 4wk holiday to Australia and use some of that time to approach schools and businesses in my area if expertise to see if we could get sponsored. Come home and hopefully start the process of sponsored visa with company/business that said yes. If none do then we just keep trying and in the mean time gain more experience until we can go over on the skilled visa route. During the 3yrs we can also save hard to pay for our move.

 

Matt

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If you are good with cars already and you like the work, try and get some formal qualifications in that field. Another option would be to look at getting experience with heavy machinery (JCB, big trucks). A degree is not a guarantee of getting a visa or a job.

 

I think car mechanics are in demand and on the wanted list at the moment but you would need recognised qualifications and experience.

 

Them's the breaks unfortunately. Otherwise Aus would be no better than the UK.

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Just as a source of inspiration I changed careers six years ago with obtaining a visa in mind and started studying and training for formal qualifications a year later...diploma, trade certs etc. I even did an AQFIII in horticulture to promote my case and boost my job prospects in Oz. We have just received our SA visa grant 3 months before my 45th birthday. Tight timing indeed!

If it really is your dream go for it...you might have to retrain and things will undoubtedly change with the migration system. Worst way out you end up better qualified and hopefully better paid in the uk.

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Guest Immortal

I think the whole process is so unfair. Given the visa I'd work my ass off and certainly wouldn't scrounge their welfare sustem so why must I wait possibly 6 years to get there?

 

Matt

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You know those times when you are a kid and your parents tell you you have to do well at school and Uni and/or work. You don't realise at the time how right they are until you do something like thinking about living somewhere else in the World.

Suddenly you realise they were right all along.:yes:

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Guest Immortal
You know those times when you are a kid and your parents tell you you have to do well at school and Uni and/or work. You don't realise at the time how right they are until you do something like thinking about living somewhere else in the World.

Suddenly you realise they were right all along.:yes:

 

Really helpful that. I did well at school. (mostly A's and a few B's) but indid what lots of others did and went straight into employment. A judgemental post like yours is just stupid.

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Really helpful that. I did well at school. (mostly A's and a few B's) but indid what lots of others did and went straight into employment. A judgemental post like yours is just stupid.

 

Sorry mate. Didn't mean it to sound like that. You did better than me at school, I left after O'levels and did an apprenticeship with the coalboard. Worked as a fitter for about 15 years and then went back to Uni to do a degree in Computer Aided Engineering. Just lucky the way things turned out.

 

I never took a blind bit of notice when my parents were telling me what I should or shouldn't be doing, always thought I knew better. More interested in drinking, partying, playing football.

 

Lucky later on when Margaret Thatcher was in power and jobs "up North" disappearing. Had an ONC qualification from my apprenticeship days which got me onto a Higher Tech Certificate course at the local tech college. Had to do a 4 week intensive maths course to get on it as I hadn't done any studying for years. Only time I realised it might be a good idea to try and learn something. Went from there to Uni at age 31 and did a straight 3 year degree.

 

Had to take a big drop in salary for a few years after finishing but all worked out in the end.

 

You sound pretty young and are already into car maintenance. I would suggest exploring every option possible to get some training/qualifications in that or bigger diesel engine and heavy maintenance. There is going to be a massive shortage of trained people for the mining industry for the next few years.

 

It might seem a long road but if you are really set on Aus it may be worth it.

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