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Olalla

Which spouse applies (189)? 41 lawyer & 39 teacher

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Hello,

I'm a lawyer (41) and wife is an early childhood/elementary school teacher (39). We have four kids all under 10 and she has been a stay at home mom for the past 5 years.

I ran the calculator and her score is 85 while mine is only 80. Do we make her the primary applicant?  Her 40th birthday is in April so clock is ticking. It seems like an 85 is borderline. 

Overall our plan is to settle in Perth. I have a second cousin there with more family. I'd have around $400k USD for a move. I'd like to keep costs under $30k. Should I hire a migration agent? I assume I'll need to be admitted to WA bar and would need help building a portfolio of course work to avoid taking more classes. Can an agent help with that? 

Anything I'm missing? 

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I should also add we are Americans (Seattle) and timeframe for move is 2 years.

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32 minutes ago, Olalla said:

Hello,

I'm a lawyer (41) and wife is an early childhood/elementary school teacher (39). We have four kids all under 10 and she has been a stay at home mom for the past 5 years.

I ran the calculator and her score is 85 while mine is only 80. Do we make her the primary applicant?  Her 40th birthday is in April so clock is ticking. It seems like an 85 is borderline. 

Overall our plan is to settle in Perth. I have a second cousin there with more family. I'd have around $400k USD for a move. I'd like to keep costs under $30k. Should I hire a migration agent? I assume I'll need to be admitted to WA bar and would need help building a portfolio of course work to avoid taking more classes. Can an agent help with that? 

Anything I'm missing? 

I think it would be a very wise move to consult with an agent.  There are a few on this forum who are very helpful.  @paulhand is one and there are a couple of others. 

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40 minutes ago, Olalla said:

Hello,

I'm a lawyer (41) and wife is an early childhood/elementary school teacher (39). We have four kids all under 10 and she has been a stay at home mom for the past 5 years.

I ran the calculator and her score is 85 while mine is only 80. Do we make her the primary applicant?  Her 40th birthday is in April so clock is ticking. It seems like an 85 is borderline. 

With those scores, neither of you stands a chance. Have you allowed to take the English test?  As English speakers you don't have to, but you are allowed to take it and count the points towards your total.  You need 90 points minimum and preferably 95 for the 189.

Teachers must have a four-year degree.  

If your timeframe is 2 years, then apply now. Once you get the visa, you have a year to visit Australia to activate the visa - but that's all you have to do, literally arrive and leave again. Once activated, you have 5 years from the time your visa was granted to make the permanent move.   It's getting harder and harder to get a visa, so better to get it under your belt asap and worry about when you're going to move later.

You can save money by using an agent but I wouldn't advise it these days.  Visas are complex nowadays and the government is always making changes - which agents get notified about, but the government website is not always updated promptly.  Any good agent will give you an initial consultation free of charge which is very useful in itself. 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

With those scores, neither of you stands a chance. Have you allowed to take the English test?  As English speakers you don't have to, but you are allowed to take it and count the points towards your total.  You need 90 points minimum and preferably 95 for the 189.

Teachers must have a four-year degree.  

If your timeframe is 2 years, then apply now. Once you get the visa, you have a year to visit Australia to activate the visa - but that's all you have to do, literally arrive and leave again. Once activated, you have 5 years from the time your visa was granted to make the permanent move.   It's getting harder and harder to get a visa, so better to get it under your belt asap and worry about when you're going to move later.

You can save money by using an agent but I wouldn't advise it these days.  Visas are complex nowadays and the government is always making changes - which agents get notified about, but the government website is not always updated promptly.  Any good agent will give you an initial consultation free of charge which is very useful in itself. 

Thanks for the reply. Those numbers are rough. Mine given is assuming I can ace the English test as it is. I don't have any avenue to hitting 90. It seems all the extra points concern work or schooling in Australia and we just don't have that. If a 190 was an option my wife might hit 90. She has a four year BA with an additional teaching cert in early childhood development. 

My cousin in Perth made a move sound so doable! We're going to have to secure an agent. Are they preferable to an immigration lawyer? 

Edited by Olalla

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1 minute ago, Olalla said:

Thanks for the reply. Those numbers are rough. Mine given is assuming I can ace the English test as it is. I don't have any avenue to hitting 90. It seems all the extra points concern work of schooling in Australia and we just don't have that. If a 190 was an option my wife might hit 90. She has a four year BA with an additional teaching cert in early childhood development. 

My cousin in Perth made a move sound so doable! We're going to have to secure an agent. Are they preferable to an immigration lawyer? 

Yes definitely.

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Just now, Toots said:

Yes definitely.

Thanks. I messaged Paul.

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Just now, Olalla said:

Thanks. I messaged Paul.

Good luck! 😀

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If your occupation is listed as eligible for a 190 how do you gain the extra 5 points? Based on WA list below both my wife and I have jobs listed. 

 

WA 190 list

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13 hours ago, Olalla said:

If your occupation is listed as eligible for a 190 how do you gain the extra 5 points? Based on WA list below both my wife and I have jobs listed. 

 

WA 190 list

Paul will help you with all that. 

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14 hours ago, Olalla said:

My cousin in Perth made a move sound so doable! We're going to have to secure an agent. Are they preferable to an immigration lawyer? 

How long ago did your cousin move?   It has got far more difficult in the last decade or so.  Definitely use an agent, not a lawyer.  Agents are specialists in making applications and tend to charge fixed fees.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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22 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

How long ago did your cousin move?   It has got far more difficult in the last decade or so.  Definitely use an agent, not a lawyer.  Agents are specialists in making applications and tend to charge fixed fees.  

Ha he moved in 1982! Polishing off a CV to send to Paul now.

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Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, Olalla said:

Ha he moved in 1982! Polishing off a CV to send to Paul now.

I migrated in 1985.  The application form was easy, the process was quick, and migrants arrived to find cheap housing and plentiful jobs (I was offered three jobs within weeks of arriving).  It's not like that now. 

Because Australia was eagerly seeking migrants for most of the 20th century, the idea is cemented in people's minds, but it's not like that now.   Now, Australia is much the same as any other country, with a plentiful supply of local workers in most occupations.  Pre-Covid, the unemployment rate in Australia was about the same as the UK's.  LIke the UK, that has led to some community resistance to migration ("foreigners taking our jobs"), adn that influences the government's attitude.   

Thanks to Covid, the unemployment rate has shot up and I wonder what effect that will have on migration policy - there are already mutterings about cutting the numbers.  There are still shortages in highly-skilled occupations, but our government is more inclined to do what's popular than what's sensible, so who knows.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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