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Racheld

WHV near upper age limit

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Hi everyone, 

So I went to Australia in 2014 - 2015 on a cultural Exchange Visa. I did some volunteering through a UK organisation. I am planning on applying for WHV I will be 29 when I apply. I know if you do farm work for 88 days you can get a second WHV if I applied for second WHV I would be 30 years old. Would I still get accepted as I would be under 31?

My second question is in order to get permanent residency do have to live in Australia for 4 years. So if Im right in thinking if I got my second year WHV  I just need to find another visa for 1 year. 

 

Your help is much appreciated. 

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Firstly, I suggest that you log onto the Dept of Immigration and Border Protection website and read all the information about permanent residency visas.   www.border.gov.au

Cultural Exchange and Working Holiday visas do not constitute a pathway to permanent residency.

Secondly, as long as you complete your farm work during your first WHV year, you will be granted the second year visa.   Also be aware that there is talk of the upper age limit for WHV to be raised to 35.


......Just trying to be helpful so don't shoot me down if my personal views do not coincide with yours! :animal-dog:

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Yep - Rossmoyne is correct.

Think the WHV age limit is moving to 35.

2nd - it is a temporary visa - you come and holiday and are allowed to do some work to help fund it.  It is not a path to PR.

If PR is your ultimate goal - there are visas for that, based on points - occupation, qualifications, experience, English language, age etc.  May be worth a chat with a migration agent to check your options on this one.

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A working holiday visa is what it says on the tin. A holiday, after which you leave and return home.

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On 20/07/2017 at 19:44, Racheld said:

Hi everyone, 

So I went to Australia in 2014 - 2015 on a cultural Exchange Visa. I did some volunteering through a UK organisation. I am planning on applying for WHV I will be 29 when I apply. I know if you do farm work for 88 days you can get a second WHV if I applied for second WHV I would be 30 years old. Would I still get accepted as I would be under 31?

My second question is in order to get permanent residency do have to live in Australia for 4 years. So if Im right in thinking if I got my second year WHV  I just need to find another visa for 1 year. 

 

Your help is much appreciated. 

You should be fine to get your WHV renewed. But keep in mind that the only fact of living in Australia does not make anybody eligible for Permanent Residency.

The Permanent Residency is a visa process you need to apply for. This is pretty strict and very controlled as it should be.

So read everything carefully the Immigration Website to see if you could potentially be eligible now. If you are not eligible now with your current skills, I do not see how you could become eligible while being on WHV.

If I was your age and would dream to immigrate to Austraila, I'd probably travel in the country during two years or one year here and one year in New-Zealand. You are young, you should make the most of it :-)

Then I would study at an Australian University to obtain skills that Australia needs. That's a long term startegy which requires time, money and also risk because you never know what the future holds.


Citizenship Application lodged online: 09/05/2019 (aknowledgement received on the same day)

Citizenship Email for the test received: 19/07/2019

Citizenship Test on:  19/12/2019 (results: 100%)

Citizenship Application approved 20/12/2019

Citizenship Approval letter received: 08/01/2019

EOI received: 23/06/2020

Invitation received: 26/06/2020

Citizenship Ceremony: 30/06/2020

Council: City of Port Phillip (Melbourne, Victoria)

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3 hours ago, jess6 said:

You should be fine to get your WHV renewed. But keep in mind that the only fact of living in Australia does not make anybody eligible for Permanent Residency.

The Permanent Residency is a visa process you need to apply for. This is pretty strict and very controlled as it should be.

So read everything carefully the Immigration Website to see if you could potentially be eligible now. If you are not eligible now with your current skills, I do not see how you could become eligible while being on WHV.

If I was your age and would dream to immigrate to Austraila, I'd probably travel in the country during two years or one year here and one year in New-Zealand. You are young, you should make the most of it :-)

Then I would study at an Australian University to obtain skills that Australia needs. That's a long term startegy which requires time, money and also risk because you never know what the future holds.

That isn't actually a very good strategy. 

The majority of people who study in Australia have to leave afterwards. In order to pass a skills assessment for a permanent visa, most occupations need a number of years post qualification experience. Also, studying as an international student can be incredibly expensive and with no government assistance. Then of course is the issue that the occupation lists change regularly with occupations being removed. 

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You will be fine to renew your WHV. I came over on WHV which I applied for aged 30. After travelling for a while I got a 6 month contract in Melbourne. When I told them I was going to have to leave because of my visa restrictions (can only work for 6 months with same organisation) they offered to sponsor me.
However, I worried that the organisation would have massive redundancies down the line and that my visa would be cancelled so I opted to apply for permanent residency whilst in Australia.
We made our application, headed off travelling again and had it granted 4 months later. I'm glad that I opted to apply for PR myself as u have heard of a few people being sponsored then being paid off and having to leave. It has meant that we are a bit more secure and can live where the work is. We now own a house in Perth and have a baby and eligible to apply for citizenship in January 2018.
Obtaining PR will very much depend on what skills/experience you have and whether you meet the criteria. Have a look at that on the immigration website and do remember that things can change pretty quickly.


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On 23/07/2017 at 02:54, VERYSTORMY said:

That isn't actually a very good strategy. 

The majority of people who study in Australia have to leave afterwards. In order to pass a skills assessment for a permanent visa, most occupations need a number of years post qualification experience. Also, studying as an international student can be incredibly expensive and with no government assistance. Then of course is the issue that the occupation lists change regularly with occupations being removed. 

I would argue that it depends on what she studies and her long term goals in life. If her life dream is to live in Australia, then she looks at the immi website and try. Occupations like nursing and teaching will take time before being removed from the long term list.

Edited by jess6

Citizenship Application lodged online: 09/05/2019 (aknowledgement received on the same day)

Citizenship Email for the test received: 19/07/2019

Citizenship Test on:  19/12/2019 (results: 100%)

Citizenship Application approved 20/12/2019

Citizenship Approval letter received: 08/01/2019

EOI received: 23/06/2020

Invitation received: 26/06/2020

Citizenship Ceremony: 30/06/2020

Council: City of Port Phillip (Melbourne, Victoria)

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On ‎24‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 06:46, jess6 said:

I would argue that it depends on what she studies and her long term goals in life. If her life dream is to live in Australia, then she looks at the immi website and try. Occupations like nursing and teaching will take time before being removed from the long term list.

You would be surprised at what can be removed. For example, medical doctors you would think are 100% safe. Yet the government has announced its intent to remove most from the list. Teaching has actually moved on an off several times - primary is now only on the short term list and I suspect it will disappear.

The very lists themselves may change a lot yet in the nature of how they operate

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28 minutes ago, VERYSTORMY said:

You would be surprised at what can be removed. For example, medical doctors you would think are 100% safe. Yet the government has announced its intent to remove most from the list. Teaching has actually moved on an off several times - primary is now only on the short term list and I suspect it will disappear.

The very lists themselves may change a lot yet in the nature of how they operate

I am not at all suprised by medics being removed. Globally it's s  a common qualification since it's  a big earner for the graduates once qualified plus Australia has a 1st world medical system so it's  a popular place to practice.  As Australia matures as a country and produces it's own workers  there is less need to import skills which the current changes reflect.

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