The Pom Queen

Sydneys Overcrowded Schools

6 posts in this topic

There are 60 girls to a toilet at Chatswood Public School, children access the playground in shifts, and one-third of the school has been moved to high school land across the road, according to parents.

The school, which the P&C says was built for 800 students, currently has 1246 pupils, and more are expected.

Sydney needs more schools

 

Over the next ten years demand for schools across Sydney is almost going to double.

"We have 11 kindy classes at the moment and I'd say we'll get the same next year, another 120 kids," Brett Backhouse, president of the school's P&C, said.

"We don't have anywhere to put them. We're the biggest school on the north shore [and] we have less than seven square metres of playground space per child.

"They have to go to the toilet during class because there isn't enough time at lunch. I think that's appalling."

The most recent enrolment data from the NSW Department of Education shows student numbers at Chatswood have ballooned 41 per cent in just four years, increasing from 883 in 2013 to 1246 this year.

This is almost three times faster than enrolments across greater Sydney, which rose by 10.8 per cent over the same period.

Other north shore schools are also bursting at the seams, with Mowbray Public growing 42 per cent since 2013 to 511 students this year, and Artarmon Public swelling 25 per cent to 1145 students.

But the north shore is not alone. Other schools where booming enrolments have seen student numbers climb past 1000 include Carlingford West, which increased 47 per cent to 1164 students, and Epping West, which grew 44 per cent to 1095 students.

Girraween Public in western Sydney has swelled 36 per cent to 1110 students in 2017.

Among the smaller schools, enrolments at Bourke Street Public have soared nearly 12 times faster than enrolments across greater Sydney. There, student numbers have risen 129 per cent since 2013 to 430 this year.

 

Over the past year, the figures show Camden in Sydney's south west and Strathfield in the inner west have overtaken Waverley as the fastest-growing local government areas for primary school enrolments. Student numbers jumped by 6.9 per cent in Camden and 6.7 per cent in Strathfield, compared with a 2.6 per cent rise across greater Sydney.

Recently opened schools are growing quickly, including Marie Bashir Public, in Strathfield, which opened in 2014.

It has grown 17.1 per cent to 322 students while Oran Park Public, in Camden, which also opened in 2014, leapt by 66.1 per cent to 716 students.

 

 

 

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Further examples of infrastructure not keeping up with continued (though reduced) excessive migration. This results in reduced living standards for many, when not planned accordingly. Just how many in per cent terms are from abroad?

One another note,one may well wonder just how do people afford to have kids in Sydney anyway?

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12 hours ago, The Pom Queen said:

There are 60 girls to a toilet at Chatswood Public School, children access the playground in shifts, and one-third of the school has been moved to high school land across the road, according to parents.

The school, which the P&C says was built for 800 students, currently has 1246 pupils, and more are expected.

Sydney needs more schools

 

Over the next ten years demand for schools across Sydney is almost going to double.

"We have 11 kindy classes at the moment and I'd say we'll get the same next year, another 120 kids," Brett Backhouse, president of the school's P&C, said.

"We don't have anywhere to put them. We're the biggest school on the north shore [and] we have less than seven square metres of playground space per child.

"They have to go to the toilet during class because there isn't enough time at lunch. I think that's appalling."

The most recent enrolment data from the NSW Department of Education shows student numbers at Chatswood have ballooned 41 per cent in just four years, increasing from 883 in 2013 to 1246 this year.

This is almost three times faster than enrolments across greater Sydney, which rose by 10.8 per cent over the same period.

Other north shore schools are also bursting at the seams, with Mowbray Public growing 42 per cent since 2013 to 511 students this year, and Artarmon Public swelling 25 per cent to 1145 students.

But the north shore is not alone. Other schools where booming enrolments have seen student numbers climb past 1000 include Carlingford West, which increased 47 per cent to 1164 students, and Epping West, which grew 44 per cent to 1095 students.

Girraween Public in western Sydney has swelled 36 per cent to 1110 students in 2017.

Among the smaller schools, enrolments at Bourke Street Public have soared nearly 12 times faster than enrolments across greater Sydney. There, student numbers have risen 129 per cent since 2013 to 430 this year.

 

Over the past year, the figures show Camden in Sydney's south west and Strathfield in the inner west have overtaken Waverley as the fastest-growing local government areas for primary school enrolments. Student numbers jumped by 6.9 per cent in Camden and 6.7 per cent in Strathfield, compared with a 2.6 per cent rise across greater Sydney.

Recently opened schools are growing quickly, including Marie Bashir Public, in Strathfield, which opened in 2014.

It has grown 17.1 per cent to 322 students while Oran Park Public, in Camden, which also opened in 2014, leapt by 66.1 per cent to 716 students.

 

 

 

I thought controlled immigration sorted this sort of thing out? Do you still have issues? Does this mean Brexit won't fix everything?

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We live in one of the outlying suburbs of Sydney (southern Sutherland Shire), and our school has been growing in the years that our children have attended.  However, I suspect it is due to increasing house purchase and rental prices rather than immigration.  There has been an influx of people moving to this area because they are priced out of more central suburbs (even from within Sutherland Shire).  The school now has two demountable classrooms, and a couple of other rooms in one of the main buildings have been converted into classrooms too.  I have also noticed that there are far more composite classes now than there were when our girls started, presumably because there are more kids at the bottom end of the school meaning that kids have to get bumped up to the classes at the top end of the school.  

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My school has more than 10 demountables as well as the 'regular' buildings and classrooms. It is bursting at the seams, yet, we will carry on taking enrolments because we have to  for any student within the catchment area. Most of the students are from overseas. More new schools are needed and rather quickly.

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Double the immigration intake and increased GDP will pay for it. On second thoughts, perhaps not a cut by half may arrest the chaos un necessary being imposed on services. 

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