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Loopylu

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About Loopylu

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  • Birthday October 12

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  1. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    As a lawyer I agree with Marissa on the tax front. Tax law specialist lawyers are the most expensive lawyers to consult, typically charging a 20% premium on the average commercial lawyer rate. They are also more versed in how to help the very rich and corporations to avoid tax. A tax agent is the way to go.
  2. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    Australia is not a cheap place to live. At least in the UK all medications are free to those on an aged pension… no need if you are on a low income to choose between your health and food/rent.
  3. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    I agree wholeheartedly about the 80s. Not sure how this issue is going to be fixed in either country as people continue to vote for minimal tax cuts over hospitals, schools etc for the greater good. All we can do is try to be kind and generous to others and make the most of life I suppose.
  4. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    I tend to agree. I have noticed lots of new housing developments in the villages of Worcestershire and also in Carmarthenshire. New industrial estates and shopping centres too.
  5. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    Unfortunately due to my husband being on dialysis I don’t think he will ever live back in the UK again. He may not be a candidate for a transplant as his kidney failure is caused by an autoimmune condition and you can only dialyse for so long. The average life expectancy on dialysis is 5 years but obviously some people go much longer. I will look into being a living donor as a new kidney even if attacked by his body may give him more time.
  6. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    My Australian husband returned to Australia in 2008 after 15 years in the UK and he found the culture had changed immensely and in his opinion not for the better. He felt Australia had adopted the worst excesses and selfishness of the USA. No one was laid back anymore and everyone whinged about first world problems. The cost of living and housing had also shot up making it far more expensive than the average cost of living outside of London and the South East. Fast forward 14 years and he is starting to think the UK would be a better place to grow old after the way his mother was treated by aged care and Medicare in comparison to what my parents have experienced in the UK.
  7. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    Healthcare in Worcestershire has been dire for a long time. I grew up in Kidderminster and we lost our fantastic A&E and maternity (reports showed it was well run and kept within budget) so they could pump more money into the terrible Worcester PFI and Redditch hospitals. I would not recommend North Wales healthcare either as the health authority there has been in special measures…. My Mum lives in Carmarthenshire and they get excellent healthcare there (Hywel Dda). My Dad had terminal pancreatic cancer and every area of care (GP, district nurses, Marie Curie, Macmillan, oncology and palliative) was second to none. My friend’s husband had terminal cancer at the same time in Brisbane and she was amazed at how much more support was available in that very rural part of Wales. She had major issues and wrote a 15 page report on the terrible care her husband got at the Royal Brisbane Hospital. It is now being investigated by the Department of Health. My family’s experience of the RBH has also been bad. Qld Health is failing too. Yes - scans are easy to come by in Australia but in my view a lot of Medicare funds are wasted on just in case scans by GPs who are afraid of being sued which could be spent on more beds for elective surgery. Australian healthcare is great if you can afford private healthcare and live close to a city but places like Doomadgee where young Aboriginal people die of easily preventable rheumatic heart disease due to institutional racism in healthcare are terrible. Also that young white lad who died of an in growing toenail in SA shocked me. I hope your Dad is OK and has the test results he needs to get the best treatment.
  8. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    I have often read your posts and thought we were singing from the same or a very similar hymn sheet. You are lucky to have some property here in the UK that you could potentially use as a home for part of the year and split your time between both places. I'm currently away for a week with my Mum in very rural Worcestershire. We are right by a mill pond in a beautiful barn conversion. The sun is shining and all is well with the world when you can sit outside (with no flies or mozzies) and eat some lovely grub from the local Waitrose in Droitwich....
  9. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    I’m not back in the UK permanently but on a 3 month stay as my Dad died in February. I am lucky in that I can work remotely from here. I return to Qld in early May. I am looking forward to seeing my husband and kids again. I will have had my UK fix for a while and so can cope with life on prison island again…. At least I’ve missed the worst of the incessant La Niña rain and it will be cooler.
  10. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    Yeah - Tassie only really has Aurora as retailer for small customers. It’s similar in regional Qld where only Ergon Electricity supplies mums and dads customers and the cost to deliver is heavily subsidised by the State through the Community Service Obligation. Unfortunately electricity prices are set to soar in the next few months in Australia so wages are going to have to rise after nearly 13 years of stagnation.
  11. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    The standing charge is quite low but where those without solar are subsidising those with solar is that about 35-40% of the electricity consumption charge is attributable to the transmission and distribution use of system charge. So those without solar pay more towards the poles and wires that everyone uses. It hits the poor most who cannot avoid solar. That’s why they are talking of introducing an extra levy on those with solar so they pay a fairer share of maintaining grid capacity at a level that everyone can use when the sun doesn’t shine.
  12. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    Your assessment of the situation is spot on. I went to talks by Paul Simshauser about 8 years ago where he raised the issue around solar penetration and insufficient revenue to distribution companies to fund the poles and wires needed when there is no sun. He also raised the issue of those who cannot afford solar subsidising the rich as those without solar would pay the lion’s share of the standing charge. He reckoned that those with solar would have to pay a fair share of the standing charge. The other issue is that in SÀ they now stop solar exports when the grid is oversupplied or charge to export. Dynamic operating envelopes will soon be with us but it will be a brave government who forces it through.
  13. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    https://www.afr.com/companies/energy/households-set-for-higher-power-bills-as-wholesale-prices-double-20220404-p5aaqa
  14. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    I’ve no idea about European prices but I understand that Australia has not yet experienced the full flow through of increased energy prices. As you’ll know, the Fed Govt has reduced fuel excise to ensure petrol prices go down ahead of the election. My husband said petrol was as high as $2.52/litre recently but is now back down to $1.55 following a reduction in global oil price and the excise cut. Australia also produces its own coal and has an abundance of CSG to generate electricity and this explains in part the reluctance to transition more quickly to renewables which will require greater investment which a free market is not delivering and the LNP has done nothing policy wise to encourage private investment. Europe has also some way to go before it stops taking Russian gas whereas the UK stopped taking any last week which will have contributed to higher gas prices in the UK. I am guessing that Brexit has also played a large part in pushing up imported fuel costs as it seems to have done for all other imports. UK is now looking to build several nuclear power stations. No doubt favourable terms for trading uranium featured in the recent Aus/UK trade agreement.
  15. Loopylu

    Still here and still feel the pull

    I have worked in the electricity industry in Qld for 14 years and did the same in the UK for 15 years. Believe me - there have been as many small electricity companies go to the wall in Australia - it just isn’t considered newsworthy in the same way as it is in the UK. In both markets, the big players manoeuvre to put them out of business and reduce competition, pushing up prices for consumers. My Mum also had fixed electricity charged for a couple of years but is reliant on oil for heating. She is lucky to also have solar so her bills aren’t too high in any event.
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