Jump to content

You're currently viewing the forum as a Guest
register-now-button_orig.png
and join in with discussions   
ask migration questions
message other members

..and much much more!

The Pom Queen

Horses in Australia

Recommended Posts

Following on from @Bulya post on how much it was going to cost him a week to care for his horse $280 pw ($1500) and how much it is costing people to feed their horses in the drought especially when they have 10 +. 
I don’t know a thing about horses. I know I got a mouthful off one local for saying she had some lovely horses, I was told they aren’t horses but miniatures?  Then we have a vet from UQ who is local to us, her horses are absolutely huge, I see them when I’m in my wheelchair and they are quite intimidating they are so big. She also has one that I would say looks like a shire horse (well how I remember them as a child) but it doesn’t have the long mane just the furry feet. 😂😂 See I told you I have no idea at all about horses.

So please share photos of your horses with me. We can call this thread Teaching the Dummy Admin all About Horses 😂😂🐴


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also how much does it cost you all per week to feed your horse? What do you feed it? 


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, The Pom Queen said:

Following on from @Bulya post on how much it was going to cost him a week to care for his horse $280 pw ($1500) and how much it is costing people to feed their horses in the drought especially when they have 10 +. 
I don’t know a thing about horses. I know I got a mouthful off one local for saying she had some lovely horses, I was told they aren’t horses but miniatures?  Then we have a vet from UQ who is local to us, her horses are absolutely huge, I see them when I’m in my wheelchair and they are quite intimidating they are so big. She also has one that I would say looks like a shire horse (well how I remember them as a child) but it doesn’t have the long mane just the furry feet. 😂😂 See I told you I have no idea at all about horses.

So please share photos of your horses with me. We can call this thread Teaching the Dummy Admin all About Horses 😂😂🐴

Those big ones are Clydesdales, big with ‘furry feet’.  Used to see mini’s (miniatures) at shows, they looked wrong to me.  As for feed etc we have no idea on current prices, I thought our horse days were in the past. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a Thoroughbred who was a fairly high-level dressage horse; he never raced as he was 17hh and physically too big (and dopey) to fit into the stalls.was the softest thing ever.  We are lucky around here to have pretty good pasture so I only every had to supplement his feed to keep a bit of condition on him; lucerne was his favourite, so once a day I'd mix a bucket of lucerne with soy and vegetable oil.  Downside is that we have Queensland itch which he suffered with unless I treated him over couple of days.

Unfortunately I had a bad accident on him which involved two plates and 17 screws being inserted in my ankle and I completely lost my nerve.  He ended up being sold to a lady from Emerald who's house opened up onto her paddock - she sent me a picture of him in her kitchen eating the fruit off the table, cheeky bugger.  Still miss him but he's with a good owner who updates me on what he's up to.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have four elderly horses - all rescues.  Plenty of pasture here but during winter when the weather is a lot harsher they get a mixture of oats, barley, flaked maize and bran.  They also get a hay net of lucerne at night.  I share the upkeep with three other people which keeps the costs down.  The eldest mare is over 30 but still in good nick.  She just needs to have her back teeth rasped every now and again.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My plan on moving here was to get horses again, but life got busy and it never happened. My first xmas here i spent Jackarooing on horseback and that was awesome (if hubby liked being inland i'd want to do that as a job).

In the UK my last baby was a pure Arab, the one before her an Arab x Welsh. I grew up on a farm where we did livery so i grew up around everything from Clydesdale's to Shetlands, i have to say Shetlands can be nasty little things,i was bitten when i was about 8 on my shoulder by one and it made a real mess, the same pony bit my Aunty right on her boob a few weeks later the little PITA! I like my fruit loop, ditzy Arabs the best.

 Cal x

  • Like 3

If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, calNgary said:

My plan on moving here was to get horses again, but life got busy and it never happened. My first xmas here i spent Jackarooing on horseback and that was awesome (if hubby liked being inland i'd want to do that as a job).

In the UK my last baby was a pure Arab, the one before her an Arab x Welsh. I grew up on a farm where we did livery so i grew up around everything from Clydesdale's to Shetlands, i have to say Shetlands can be nasty little things,i was bitten when i was about 8 on my shoulder by one and it made a real mess, the same pony bit my Aunty right on her boob a few weeks later the little PITA! I like my fruit loop, ditzy Arabs the best.

 Cal x

Pure Arabs are my favourites Cal.  Yes they are ditzy especially to ride them on a windy day.  Dancing and prancing all over the place.  I've worked with them over the years and seen them crossed with thoroughbreds and native ponies.   I agree about Shetlands.  Grumpy little so and so's.  Also really strong - both in will power and physically   ............ not an ideal child's pony really.  Like you, I grew up around horses and never had any fear of them in spite of being bitten, kicked and occasionally tossed off them. My sister on the other hand is scared of them. Big wuss.  😀  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06/02/2020 at 02:49, Bulya said:

Those big ones are Clydesdales, big with ‘furry feet’.  Used to see mini’s (miniatures) at shows, they looked wrong to me.  As for feed etc we have no idea on current prices, I thought our horse days were in the past. 

I love the Clydesdale they use to pull the brewery carts didn’t they.
How big are minis? I was once conned in to buying a miniature pig many years ago. It was huge when it grew up, but I was told it was still classed as miniature. I’ve seen people call the ones that look the size of a Shetland pony a mini, but then I’ve seen photos of a miniature smaller than a dog or is that photoshopped?


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06/02/2020 at 08:15, Eera said:

I had a Thoroughbred who was a fairly high-level dressage horse; he never raced as he was 17hh and physically too big (and dopey) to fit into the stalls.was the softest thing ever.  We are lucky around here to have pretty good pasture so I only every had to supplement his feed to keep a bit of condition on him; lucerne was his favourite, so once a day I'd mix a bucket of lucerne with soy and vegetable oil.  Downside is that we have Queensland itch which he suffered with unless I treated him over couple of days.

Unfortunately I had a bad accident on him which involved two plates and 17 screws being inserted in my ankle and I completely lost my nerve.  He ended up being sold to a lady from Emerald who's house opened up onto her paddock - she sent me a picture of him in her kitchen eating the fruit off the table, cheeky bugger.  Still miss him but he's with a good owner who updates me on what he's up to.

I would love to see a photo he sounds absolutely amazing. I didn’t know horses suffered from Queensland Itch, in fact I’d totally forgotten about it until now, what did you use to treat him?

I am so sorry to hear about your accident that’s absolutely terrible, not only the pain from the fall but also from parting with him. I’m so glad he found a loving home. 
‘Will you ever ride again?


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06/02/2020 at 08:28, Toots said:

We have four elderly horses - all rescues.  Plenty of pasture here but during winter when the weather is a lot harsher they get a mixture of oats, barley, flaked maize and bran.  They also get a hay net of lucerne at night.  I share the upkeep with three other people which keeps the costs down.  The eldest mare is over 30 but still in good nick.  She just needs to have her back teeth rasped every now and again.

Do you have to do their feet etc? 


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06/02/2020 at 09:22, calNgary said:

My plan on moving here was to get horses again, but life got busy and it never happened. My first xmas here i spent Jackarooing on horseback and that was awesome (if hubby liked being inland i'd want to do that as a job).

In the UK my last baby was a pure Arab, the one before her an Arab x Welsh. I grew up on a farm where we did livery so i grew up around everything from Clydesdale's to Shetlands, i have to say Shetlands can be nasty little things,i was bitten when i was about 8 on my shoulder by one and it made a real mess, the same pony bit my Aunty right on her boob a few weeks later the little PITA! I like my fruit loop, ditzy Arabs the best.

 Cal x

I have always wanted horses since being a child. The nearest I have got is going out on some horse riding tours with the youngest. The last time was probably 5 years ago in Noosa and the young girl put the horse in to a trot well I panicked like anything. My son on the other hand was a natural and loved it. Part of me still dreams of riding in to the sunset on horseback. Unfortunately now it won’t happen but I still love horses even if I know nothing about them lol.

  • Like 2

If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, The Pom Queen said:

Do you have to do their feet etc? 

Yes they need regular trimming.  None of them are shod as they rarely go onto hard roads.

One of ours has a thing called sweet itch which is a form of dermatitis and only gets it in the summer.  I wash her often with a shampoo called Malaseb which seems to help a lot.  Maybe similar to Qld itch? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, The Pom Queen said:

I love the Clydesdale they use to pull the brewery carts didn’t they.
How big are minis? I was once conned in to buying a miniature pig many years ago. It was huge when it grew up, but I was told it was still classed as miniature. I’ve seen people call the ones that look the size of a Shetland pony a mini, but then I’ve seen photos of a miniature smaller than a dog or is that photoshopped?

Clydies are massive.  Minis can be like a dog, and people show them in led classes (no riders).  Very small kids can sit on them.  Off topic but I discovered this week that horseshoes are no longer manufactured in Australia.  Last manufacturer bought out by U.S company Mustad.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, The Pom Queen said:

I would love to see a photo he sounds absolutely amazing. I didn’t know horses suffered from Queensland Itch, in fact I’d totally forgotten about it until now, what did you use to treat him?

I am so sorry to hear about your accident that’s absolutely terrible, not only the pain from the fall but also from parting with him. I’m so glad he found a loving home. 
‘Will you ever ride again?

here is is in the blue bandage.  At one point we had three horses with bandaged legs in the same paddock; The Field of Broken Thoroughbreds it became known as.  For the itch I used to use permiterol solution; it was diluted in a spray bottle and just applied to him while grooming, it also kept the bot flies off him. I had groomed him about an hour before this photo, big bugger loved muddle puddles!

ticket.JPG

Edited by Eera
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06/02/2020 at 09:15, Eera said:

I had a Thoroughbred who was a fairly high-level dressage horse; he never raced as he was 17hh and physically too big (and dopey) to fit into the stalls.was the softest thing ever.  We are lucky around here to have pretty good pasture so I only every had to supplement his feed to keep a bit of condition on him; lucerne was his favourite, so once a day I'd mix a bucket of lucerne with soy and vegetable oil.  Downside is that we have Queensland itch which he suffered with unless I treated him over couple of days.

Unfortunately I had a bad accident on him which involved two plates and 17 screws being inserted in my ankle and I completely lost my nerve.  He ended up being sold to a lady from Emerald who's house opened up onto her paddock - she sent me a picture of him in her kitchen eating the fruit off the table, cheeky bugger.  Still miss him but he's with a good owner who updates me on what he's up to.

Sorry to hear about the accident.  A horse flipped on to its rider (we know her well)  at Canberra Royal last week.  It happens more than most realise 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Bulya said:

Sorry to hear about the accident.  A horse flipped on to its rider (we know her well)  at Canberra Royal last week.  It happens more than most realise 

It was one of those dumb "how did that happen?" things.  I was dismounting him in a flat paddock and as I touched the ground somehow my ankle rolled and fracture dislocated both tib and fib.  Othopaedic surgeon said it's the sort of injury they associated with high impact sports like speed skiing, I did it dismounting a still horse in a flat paddock!  No long term effects though; luckily didn't damage the cartilage and have had the pins removed since.  No loss of motion either.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×