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pj

First Post - Worthing to Melbourne in January 2006. Crikey

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    Hi All

     

    First post but thanks for all the really useful info I've read so far.

     

    Just got word this AM that I've got a job in Melbourne, they are sponsoring me and they want me to start in January. Good job we managed to exchange on our house today as well.

     

    All I've got left to do is panic over shipping us, our cats and worldy posessions not to mention getting around all our friends, throwing a big New Years Eve party and packing up our house to move into rented for a couple of months.

     

    Still all feels surreal and I'm not getting excited till the visas in place but hey, here we go!

     

    I'm going to be a Recruitment Consultant for IT Sales people, so if there are of you out there, be sure to get in touch.

     

    My other half is a Building Surveyor and stepping into the unknown a bit as his job seems to be a bit different out there or could be called a number of things and different duties expected. Still, I'm sure we'll figure it out.

     

    Can't wait to see the sun, have a garden which isn't overlooked by another 52 people (not to mention ditchinig our constantly rowing neighbours).

     

    I've been out to visit my sister 3 times and seen a bit of Darwin, Cairns, Sydney, Newcastle and Melbourne but living there will be a whole different ballgame.

     

    Keep up the posts as it means a lot to know you're not alone and saves so much time and stress researches every little detail when there are posts of real experiences.

     

    Best of luck to everyone and may all your dreams come true.

     

    Pj xx

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    Moneycorp

    Moneycorp

    congratulations ,,i hope you have a wonderful life out there ,we are only at first base in our application ,but like you say this board helps so much and seems to answer most of your questions ,well you have a top party and 'cheers' from me xx cal


    If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

    If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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    Congrats to you and your family Pj

     

    Hope it all goes well for you.

     

    Sharon

    :D

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    Guest nuttycaz

    Hi pj

    Congrats to you.....all seems to be a bit mad here too lol

    We are to be in Geelong Melbourne in the new year too, hope to have the final yes by the end of the month or beg of november, had x-rays yesterday, kids had medicals and all seemed fine.

    Husband is being sponsered by company, and when we get the okay....hopefully it will be all systems go!!!!!!!!!

    We are taking our frisky 18 year old cat with us too!

    Much enjoy all the news from everyone and all the tips.....

    Be happy and have fun

    Big smiles

    Cazzy :D

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    Hi Cazzy

     

    Woohoo, sounds like you are nearly there. My sister used to live in Geelong and it's lovely there, close to the beach but easy to get to the city.

     

    How long has the process taken for your hubby so far? Would you mind giving me a run-down on what was done when e.g. offer letter, visa application etc. I'm just a bit nervous about the timescales and resigning at the right time whilts giving myself loads of time to spend with friends/family.

     

    I've just faxed back confirmation that I will be accepting their offer, prior to receiving the formal contract, so I guess they will be getting the ball rolling with the Oz government shortly.

     

    I'm taking my cats out too. I'm probably more nervous about them going out than my partner and I. (will they decide to chase spiders, how will they cope with the summer heat, are there ticks as big as cows over there etc. etc.).

     

    Talk again soon.

     

    Pj xx

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    Guest nuttycaz

    Hi pj

    Well, the story so far.......

    Husband enquired aug last year, emailed back and forth then heard nothing til end of june of this year, asking if he was still interested in a job. Heard back after more emails and telephone conferencing that they would like him to go over to view 4 jobs....so off he went in august for 10 days to hav a nosey, all paid for which was very nice lol, was offered a job there and then, that was best suited to him and his quals, came home thought about it, asked them to up the offer, accepted about a month ago but has not as yet given notice here as we are wanting a def 'yes' all is okey dokey with visa and meds!!! Company have sorted an agent to do all the biz online, so all we really had to do was provide was document info, which was a pain as they seemed to be too huge to email as attachments so we burned them onto disk and sent registered post. Application was lodged on the 6th of oct, we had x-rays on the 17th. Agent sez wait a week for them to arrive in oz then praps another 2 for the final yeaaaaaa, we are hoping!!!!!

    Doesn't seem any time at all that this has been going on....

    I really think I mite hav to hav a drinkie or two tonite as I didnt sleep a wink last nite!!!! well thats my excuse!!!

    I am sure TC the cat knows summat is goin on......lol lol they do don't they!!!!

    Hope to chat again, sorry if this is mostly babble!!!! :lol:

    good luck

    Cazzy x :D

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    Guest nuttycaz

    Hi pj

     

    This site was recommended to me, and have been looking at the posts on there as it is for people moving to victoria melbourne

    plenty of good stuff to read as on there too!

    I post on there as Cazzy.

     

     

    http://s7.invisionfree.com/BritVics/index.php?

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    Cazzy

     

    Thanks for the all the info. Sounds like your hubby is in real demand. What line of work is he in?

     

    I know what you mean about the cats. Mine start getting clingy as soon as the packing tape and boxes come out. Even if I'm packing a weekend bag, they start giving me the "if you leave me now" eyes.

     

    Last time I moved house, one of them did a dissapearing act on the day of completion. The car was packed, house empty, I'm fretting about having to leave stuff behind as there was just about room in the car for me and nothing else.

     

    I have to delay the completion 2.5 hours till he finally strolled through the cat flap as if nothing was up.

     

    Bless, I wouldn't be without them though.

     

    Pj xx

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    Guest nuttycaz

    Hi pj

    Not sure if you recieved my PM...

    Husband is an engineer within the cement industry, he would go over tomoz if he could!!!

    Hope all is going well for you.

    Cazzy :D

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    Cazzy

     

    If you are out there, I need a little reassurance regarding shipping my cats.

     

    I'm panicing as my cats haven't had their rabies vaccine yet and I'm confused about the timeline. They've been microchipped already.

     

    They are having their first jabs on Thursday, with the next batch exactly 30 days later? Then 30 days after that they are blood tested, am I right so far? Can you only apply for an AQIS permit after the blood tests are back?

     

    I'm getting worried that I'm going to have to leave them with a friend/cattery before all the paperwork is completed as I have to be out there by a certain date.

     

    EEEK!

     

    Pj xx

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    Guest nuttycaz

    Hi pj

    You got me going now lol!!!!

    If that is the case them I think my husband will be there before me!!

    Going to check it out with my vet today as it is 4.15 in the morning and I don't think that they will be open at this time...sleepless nite...

    TC hasn't been microchipped yet! :o

    Get back to you soon, aaaaaahhhhhhhh

    Cazzy

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    Cazzy

     

    Sorry, didn't mean to alarm you. The mircochip is easy, and once the reading is confirmed, they can vaccinate straight away. I think it depends on the vaccine whether there is a second dose required and the time between the two jabs.

     

    I'll know more after tomorrow.

     

    Pj xxx

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    Guest nuttycaz

    Hi pj

    No alarm at all lol, but you got me thinking! Took TC to the vet first thing, had his microchip done and rabies jab. We are up to date with the triple jab as he has it every year, all that needs to be done (hopefully) is the blood test which should be taken 30 days prior to leaving. Posted the form off to defra, so just need to do the one to Aus.

    Spoke to Manchester bout flight for him and probs will be around £750 if not less, as she gave me a quote for a large box.

    Hope all going well with you :D

    Cazzy x

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