Guest mandymoo

Is it best to use a migration agent???

    Recommended Posts

    Guest mandymoo

    Hello!!

     

    Is it best to use a migration agent to help you along with the process, or is it just as easy to do it off your own back??

     

    Anybody who has done either and can offer any advice would be greatly appricated.

     

    Thanks.

     

    Amanda

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Moneycorp

    Moneycorp

    I think it depends a lot on your circumstances. If you have had previous problems getting visas then I would certainly say yes. was quoted £2000 all up for an interdependency visa (same sex couple) and I very nearly did it because I thought that it would be difficult to prove one's circumstances.

     

    However to do it myself cost £800 all up so I figured I could screw it up once and still be ahead.

     

    In the end, the first application was approved in under 6 weeks and £1,200 was saved.

     

    So in my case, it wasn't necessary where I thought it would be. Take your time with the forms, collect as much relevant information as possible and collate i in an easy to read manner - make the CO's job as easy as possible.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest JC

    Hi this may seem like a silly question. We are in process of being sponsored by an employer and we are using an agent. Does anyone know if you have to pay the agency at the start? What if your application is denied do you still have to fork out??

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Heathertoes

    If you check out lots of forums you can find a lot of the information you need, also which agents to use as well. Post lots of questions and someone out there will know the answer.

     

    It does depend on whether your application is straight forward and whether or not forms freak you

    out :shock: Contact agents and get quotes.

     

    As for JC I think you will find that your agent should have told you before you started using them what their payment arrangements are. We paid ours in installments as we reached various stages. As for forking out if your application is denied, again that is something to check first with your agent they probably all have their own guidelines. We had paid all our money to our agent before the final stages.

     

    Hope this helps!

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest juliemtaylor

    Hi We are using an Agent, firstly for the ACS skills application which is in and we are waiting the result. He will then help with the visa process as we don't want to do it ourselves in case we miss something and can have help all along the way etc.

     

    Julie x

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    I applied for 175 & decided not to use an agent as there is just me (no kids & husband is Aussie anyway). I knew already that my skills assessment would be straightforward to come by, which it was, so I didn't even need any help with that.

     

    Having said all this, I'm the sort of person who is good with paperwork & form filling (have to be, working in the NHS!) & I like to be in control of things as well! It did leave me with a few questions & concerns, but this site helped with those, & my visa was granted without problems. The only difference really would have been that an agent would have known to send hubby's birth cert & passport (CO requested it just prior to visa grant).

     

    I found the online application process quite easy, & am overall glad I didn't use an agent because I don't think they'd have done much that I didn't.

     

    Hope this helps, but really it depends on whether you think you can handle the process in your circumstances.

     

    Best of luck

    Sarah x


    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    I applied for 175 & decided not to use an agent as there is just me (no kids & husband is Aussie anyway). I knew already that my skills assessment would be straightforward to come by, which it was, so I didn't even need any help with that.

     

    Having said all this, I'm the sort of person who is good with paperwork & form filling (have to be, working in the NHS!) & I like to be in control of things as well! It did leave me with a few questions & concerns, but this site helped with those, & my visa was granted without problems. The only difference really would have been that an agent would have known to send hubby's birth cert & passport (CO requested it just prior to visa grant).

     

    I found the online application process quite easy, & am overall glad I didn't use an agent because I don't think they'd have done much that I didn't.

     

    Hope this helps, but really it depends on whether you think you can handle the process in your circumstances.

     

    Best of luck

    Sarah x

     

    Sarah,

     

    Why did you apply for a skilled visa if your husband is Australian - could you not have applied for the grant of a cheaper and quicker Spouse visa?

     

    Best regards.


    Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas, www.gomatilda.com - Principal, GM Tax, www.gmtax.com.au

    Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534, Chartered Accountant (England & Wales, and Australia), and Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

    T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

    E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Hi Alan

     

    I researched all of the options when I first decided to migrate several years ago, & to be honest going on a spouse visa didn't feel right for me. Some friends of ours did that, & I just couldn't be doing with having to demonstrate that our relationship is genuine!

     

    Also (mainly), I'm fiercely independent & wanted to get a visa on my own merit. I know that I could have obtained a spouse visa & then applied for 175 onshore, but I wanted to know before leaving the UK that I could make Australia my home permanently.

     

    I know how lucky I am that I had lots of migration options, & I knew at the start that the one I was taking was not the cheapest &/or quickest - but I tend to do things my own way! As it turns out, the processing time turned to my advantage, as I got a promotion at work worth more than the visa costs!

     

    Thanks for your input - I wasn't trying to say that agents aren't worth their weight in gold. If I were in a more complex situation I would definitely have left it to a registered professional; if things are less clear-cut than my situation that someone who knows the system (& the legislation) is vital.

     

    Regards

    Sarah


    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Gollywobbler
    Hi Alan

     

    I researched all of the options when I first decided to migrate several years ago, & to be honest going on a spouse visa didn't feel right for me. Some friends of ours did that, & I just couldn't be doing with having to demonstrate that our relationship is genuine!

     

    Also (mainly), I'm fiercely independent & wanted to get a visa on my own merit. I know that I could have obtained a spouse visa & then applied for 175 onshore, but I wanted to know before leaving the UK that I could make Australia my home permanently.

     

    I know how lucky I am that I had lots of migration options, & I knew at the start that the one I was taking was not the cheapest &/or quickest - but I tend to do things my own way! As it turns out, the processing time turned to my advantage, as I got a promotion at work worth more than the visa costs!

     

    Thanks for your input - I wasn't trying to say that agents aren't worth their weight in gold. If I were in a more complex situation I would definitely have left it to a registered professional; if things are less clear-cut than my situation that someone who knows the system (& the legislation) is vital.

     

    Regards

    Sarah

     

     

    Hi Sarah

     

    My sister shared your own attitude 100%. She did not marry her Aussie hubby till after she had PR in her own right but they were living together etc. Elaine's view was that the relationship between herself & Neil was nobody's business except theirs and also she was not prepared to put up with conditions about having to prove the relationship again later and so on.

     

    I applaud you.

     

    Best wishes

     

    Gill

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Gollywobbler
    Hello!!

     

    Is it best to use a migration agent to help you along with the process, or is it just as easy to do it off your own back??

     

    Anybody who has done either and can offer any advice would be greatly appricated.

     

    Thanks.

     

    Amanda

     

    Hi Amanda

     

    I think that mostly it depends on your own temperament.

     

    Some people are nervous and want the reassurance that an Agent double-checking everything will provide. Nowt wrong with that and I would support anyone who chooses this option.

     

    Others feel that they cannot spare the time to wade through the DIAC website, teh one for the relevant skills authority and so forth so they decide to delegate the work to somebody else. Also perfectly reasonable in my opinion.

     

    Others still have complex issues involved. They do not appear to fit into any of the obvious categories easily as far as they can see. In that situation a good Agent can make a world of difference in terms of securing a successful outcome.

     

    The fourth group are confident that they will be OK on their own, so to them I would say "Go for it."

     

    Best wishes

     

    Gill

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Well put, Gill. It all comes down to personal choice I guess.

     

    I'm glad someone apart from my husband understands why I went for the 175!

     

    Sarah


    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest OgaPoga

    Hi Amanda,

    We are going with a migration agent. Few reasons for that:

    1) Know how. They have been applying and going throw these things million times and they know what they are doing and how all the process work. What steps to take when and so on.

    2) It saves a lot of time. I do not think it is difficult to apply for these visas, but there are a lot of things you should read and find out. And sometimes it is not very clear. For example - when we applied for the skills assessment, your job references needed to be written in certain way...and so on. As me and my husband are both working long hours, we were better off with agent help :)

    Those 2 are probably the main reasons.

    Yes, it costs a bit of money, but this entire move to Australia is not going to be cheep. And I think people should not forget that. And visa is very important step towards living in Australia. No visa – no Australia J

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Hi Amanda

    We are applying for a 175 and are not using an agent to save money really. It has been straight forward so far (touch wood) and because hubby has been in the same job and worked for the same employer since leaving school the TRA was pretty straight forward, this site is also brilliant for info and someone always seems to have the answers if you get stuck.

    It really is a personal choice and if money was no object I probably would have used an agent just for the reassurance, but so far so good.

    Good luck with the process whatever you decide and if you need anything and I can help let me know. x

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Only just realised but I think I may have replied to a very old post and Amanda may already be in oz lol

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now


    • Similar Content

      • By Danielle lewsey
        Hi guys. Can anyone help explain a bit about the new skilled migration visas. I know there is a medium to long term skilled occupation list(up to 4 year visa) and a short term skilled occupation list (up to two year visa). If your occupation is on the short term list, after the 2 years that you are given do you HAVE to leave the country? As I know you can no longer apply for PR after this visa. What other options are there after your 2 years on this visa are up?
      • By 420dream
        Hi there, long story short i have been looking for child care agency in NSW area that could help to find a job and assisting in visa application for RSMS but if there is any good agency located outside of NSW i am more than happy to travel to the office. I would like to ask for help to recommend any child care agency that could help me in my situation, any information would be helpful and i would like to say thanks in advance. Thanks.
         
        Regards,
         
        Alexander
      • By lebowski.junior
        Hi greetings to all! 
        I hereby pursuing Masters in project management in Australia and graduated as an Bachelor of Architect from India. And also got one year of experience from an architectural firm. 
        As per SOL 2017, Architecture is the course listed for skilled occupancy but not project management. So I consulted few migration agents, they said that I can access my current course through VETASSESS.
        But I'm not sure which occupation should I choose?
        Architecture 
        Project builder
        Construction project manager.
        Please guide me.
        Thanks.
      • By The Pom Queen
        Agent fees
        Why fees vary
        Under the Code of Conduct for registered migration agents, the amount your agent charges (fees) must be fair and reasonable. Your agent will set their fee based on your circumstances.
        Agent fees vary and depend on:
        Your visa application type. The amount of time it will take to prepare your application. Some visa applications take longer to prepare than others. You can check how much your agent might charge you in the list of fees in the Agent fee data table below. The level of service you need. If you need extra help or have complex circumstances. For example your agent might charge more if you have dependants on your application (such as children). The experience and qualifications of your agent. If your agent is a lawyer or has many years of experience, their fees might be higher. If your agent’s fees seem too high, discuss this with them before signing a contract. Consider talking to a few agents about their service and fees, before you choose one and sign a written contract with them.
         
        Agent fee data
        Every year, agents give the Office of the Migration Agents Registration Authority information about the average fees they charge.
        This table represents the range of fees charged by registered migration agents for the period 1 January to       31 December 2015. It gives you an idea of how much you might pay an agent to help with your visa.
         
        Agent fee data - 1 January to 31 December 2015 
         Temporary visa services
         Bridging visa
         Business (visitor)
         Graduate - Skilled
         Other temporary resident
         Other visitor
         Student
         Student Guardian
         Temporary Graduate
         Temporary Non-business
         Temporary Work Skilled (457)
         Tourist
         Working Holiday
        $150 - $700
        $500 - $1,500
        $900 - $2,200
        $550 - $2,800
        $400 - $1,500
        $500 - $1,650
        $500 - $1,800
        $900 - $2,200
        $500 - $3,500
        $1,800 - $5,000
        $300 - $1,000
        $200 - $1,100
         Permanent visa services
         Australian Declaratory visa
         Business Skills
         Child Migration 
         Employer Nomination Scheme
         General Skilled Migration
         Humanitarian Offshore
         Onshore Protection
         Other Skilled 
         Parent Migration
         Partner Migration
         Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme
         Returning Resident
         Skilled Independent
         Special Migration
        $500 - $4,000
        $4,000 - $15,000
        $1,100 - $3,300
        $2,000 - $5,500
        $1,500 - $4,400
        $1,200 - $3,500
        $1,500 - $4,000
        $1,500 -  $4,500
        $1,500 - $3,800
        $500 - $4,000
        $2,500 - $5,500
        $500 - $2,000
        $1,800 - $4,000
        $1,600 - $4,400
         Other
         New Zealand Special Category visa 
         Review Application
        $500 - $3,500
        $1,300 - $5,000
        Note: These fees are in Australian dollars and include Goods and Services Tax (GST). These fees do not include visa application charges payable to the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP).
         
        Initial consultation fees
        Many agents will meet with you in person or by telephone to provide general information and answer your questions before you sign a written service agreement with them. This is an initial consultation. Some agents do this for free and others charge for this service. Those who charge must tell you in writing how much you have to pay before your meeting (in person or by telephone).
         
        Agreement to Services and Fees
        Before starting work, your agent must provide you with a written estimate of fees you will be charged for their services. The estimate of charges will include:
        professional fees, either by the hour or by the service disbursements (these are other costs such as visa application charges). You should accept these financial terms in writing through an ‘Agreement for Services and Fees’. This agreement must include:
        services to be performed fees for the services (either charged per service or per hour) disbursements (money paid by the agent on your behalf, such as a visa application charge). Do not pay your agent until you have read, understood and agreed to the Agreement for Services and Fees.
         
        Payment in advance or on completion of services
        Some agents charge by asking you to pay in advance into their clients’ account (see below). Some only charge when their services are complete.
        Clients’ account
        Before your agent can take their fee, they have to give you a written statement of services. The statement must show:
        the work your agent has performed how much your agent charges—by service or by hour. The statement of services must match what your Agreement for Services and Fees says.
        A flowchart comparing how your money is handled by your agent if paid before or after services is provided is in this guide.
        Guidance for Registered Migration Agents: Parts 5 & 7 of the Code of Conduct (169 KB PDF)
         
        Clients' account
        If your agent charges you before services are completed, they must have a bank account called a ‘clients’ account’. This has to be separate from their business accounts or personal bank accounts.
        When your agent takes money from you before providing services, they are holding on to it for you. They must deposit it in the clients’ account and they cannot use it unless they need to pay for something on your behalf, such as your visa application fee.
        Your agent can only take money from the clients’ account to pay for their professional fees once they have completed a service or a large amount of work, and provided you with a statement of these services.
         
        Changes to your fees
        Your agent must give you written notice of any change to the amount they will charge for providing you with services. Your agent has to do this as soon as they become aware of the change (for example, extra work your agent did not know about when they agreed to work for you).
        Your agent must not carry out work for you in a way that unnecessarily increases the cost of the work, for example by seeking advice from specialists when not needed. 
        Fee disputes