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CCTV, Access Control and Intruder engineer - 189 Visa


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Hello

Me and my partner are trying to get over to Australia in the future. He is a CCTV, Access Control and Intruder engineer and I believe this falls under 'ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT TRADES WORKER – ANZSCO 342313' 

Has anyone tried to get over and been successful with this? We aren't too sure if his qualification is equivalent to that of the Australian qualification - all his qualification says is level 3.

We do reach the minimum points, but hopefully with a good English test we will get more points.

If his qualification isn't equivalent I think there may be no chance of us getting over, which is a huge dream crushed.

We are hoping hearing some stories of how others got over will give us a bit of light. 

 

 

 

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15 hours ago, Beth Harper said:

Me and my partner are trying to get over to Australia in the future. He is a CCTV, Access Control and Intruder engineer and I believe this falls under 'ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT TRADES WORKER – ANZSCO 342313' 

... We aren't too sure if his qualification is equivalent to that of the Australian qualification - all his qualification says is level 3.

He will need the equivalent of "AQF Certificate III including at least two years of on-the-job training, or AQF Certificate IV".  

According to Google, that means he would need to have done a NVQ / EQF Level 3 course which included 2 years of on-the-job training, OR an NVQ / EQF Level 4 course.

If he's done a Level 3 course with no on-the-job training, all is not lost.  He may be able to use some of his years of work experience to substitute. You need some expert advice to work it out -- and I would get onto it right now!

I say that because for years before Covid, you needed over 90 points to have a hope of getting a visa.  After the pandemic everything changed, and people have been getting visas on much lower points.  However, who knows how long that will last?   It would be a real shame to delay and then find the points have gone up and you've missed your chance. 

If you're not ready to move yet, it doesn't matter.  Once you get your visa, you have 5 years to make the permanent move. 

A good migration agent costs money, but then how much does this matter to you?  Try Suncoast Migration, Go Matilda or Andre Burger.

 

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8 hours ago, Marisawright said:

He will need the equivalent of "AQF Certificate III including at least two years of on-the-job training, or AQF Certificate IV".  

According to Google, that means he would need to have done a NVQ / EQF Level 3 course which included 2 years of on-the-job training, OR an NVQ / EQF Level 4 course.

If he's done a Level 3 course with no on-the-job training, all is not lost.  He may be able to use some of his years of work experience to substitute. You need some expert advice to work it out -- and I would get onto it right now!

I say that because for years before Covid, you needed over 90 points to have a hope of getting a visa.  After the pandemic everything changed, and people have been getting visas on much lower points.  However, who knows how long that will last?   It would be a real shame to delay and then find the points have gone up and you've missed your chance. 

If you're not ready to move yet, it doesn't matter.  Once you get your visa, you have 5 years to make the permanent move. 

A good migration agent costs money, but then how much does this matter to you?  Try Suncoast Migration, Go Matilda or Andre Burger.

 

His qualification is a IFATE Level 3. He started in 2018 as an apprentice and has 4 years on the job training prior to getting the qualification.

We did email True Blue but they advised it isn't an equivalent and that our best bet is a working holiday visa and to get a second opinion which knocked our confidence in this as we are wanting a permanent move.

We will definitely get in touch with the agencies above thanks for your help 🙂

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Beth Harper said:

His qualification is a IFATE Level 3. He started in 2018 as an apprentice and has 4 years on the job training prior to getting the qualification.

We did email True Blue but they advised it isn't an equivalent and that our best bet is a working holiday visa and to get a second opinion which knocked our confidence in this as we are wanting a permanent move.

If you don't have kids and you're young enough to get a working holiday visa, then I'd say you'd be a fool not to do it, honestly. 

If you apply for a permanent visa, you'll be waiting at least a year before you even know whether you can get a visa.  Whereas if you go over on a WHV, he can start gaining Australian work experience immediately.  Also, there's a good chance that he'll find an employer who's willing to sponsor him, either for a temporary work contract or even for a permanent visa, and then you'll just stay on after the end of the WHV. 

A lot of people think you have to travel around on a WHV and do odd jobs, but you'd be surprised how many people come over, settle down and stay in the same place for the whole 3 years, and work in their usual occupation.  You used to have to go out and work in the country on a WHV but that's not necessary now.   I suggest giving it some serious thought.  

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

If you don't have kids and you're young enough to get a working holiday visa, then I'd say you'd be a fool not to do it, honestly. 

If you apply for a permanent visa, you'll be waiting at least a year before you even know whether you can get a visa.  Whereas if you go over on a WHV, he can start gaining Australian work experience immediately.  Also, there's a good chance that he'll find an employer who's willing to sponsor him, either for a temporary work contract or even for a permanent visa, and then you'll just stay on after the end of the WHV. 

A lot of people think you have to travel around on a WHV and do odd jobs, but you'd be surprised how many people come over, settle down and stay in the same place for the whole 3 years, and work in their usual occupation.  You used to have to go out and work in the country on a WHV but that's not necessary now.   I suggest giving it some serious thought.  

We did think about it for a while but after looking into it, my partner couldn't get a job in his role on that visa.

If he decided to work a different job and then try and get a sponsor for a Security Technician, they state they don't do sponsors unfortunately. So we were back to square one looking at the 189 visa. 

 

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10 hours ago, Beth Harper said:

We did think about it for a while but after looking into it, my partner couldn't get a job in his role on that visa.

If he decided to work a different job and then try and get a sponsor for a Security Technician, they state they don't do sponsors unfortunately.

Why did they say he couldn't get a job in his role on that visa?  

Also, who told you "they" dont do sponsors?   That's nonsense.  His occupation is on the list, therefore he can be sponsored by an employer.  The difficult bit is finding the employer -- very very difficult while you're overseas, much easier once you're in Australia.

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14 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Why did they say he couldn't get a job in his role on that visa?  

Also, who told you "they" dont do sponsors?   That's nonsense.  His occupation is on the list, therefore he can be sponsored by an employer.  The difficult bit is finding the employer -- very very difficult while you're overseas, much easier once you're in Australia.

On the job descriptions they state ONLY Australian Citizens are hired on the ones we had looked at, and we had looked at a lot. 

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30 minutes ago, Beth Harper said:

On the job descriptions they state ONLY Australian Citizens are hired on the ones we had looked at, and we had looked at a lot. 

That could well be the case, thinking of Aussie rules and regs. CCTV is quite possibly covered by some kind of security checking for people working with it and that usually means restricted to Aus citizens.

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8 hours ago, Beth Harper said:

On the job descriptions they state ONLY Australian Citizens are hired on the ones we had looked at, and we had looked at a lot. 

OK, in that case he won't be able to get a job even if you get the 189 or 190 visa.  All that gets you is "permanent residence", not "citizenship".  You'll have to move to Australia, and be resident here for 4 years before you can apply for citizenship.  So he'll have to plan to do something else for his first 4 years in Australia, and that's the same whether you come on the WHV or come on the full visa. 

So, if that's something he's willing to do, your best bet would be to get the WHV, move over, then apply for the 189 visa once you've been here a year and are sure you want to settle.

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11 hours ago, Marisawright said:

OK, in that case he won't be able to get a job even if you get the 189 or 190 visa.  All that gets you is "permanent residence", not "citizenship".  You'll have to move to Australia, and be resident here for 4 years before you can apply for citizenship.  So he'll have to plan to do something else for his first 4 years in Australia, and that's the same whether you come on the WHV or come on the full visa. 

So, if that's something he's willing to do, your best bet would be to get the WHV, move over, then apply for the 189 visa once you've been here a year and are sure you want to settle.

Sorry I should have mentioned, they state Australian citizen or permanent residency, which we will have. 

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I tend not to comment publicly on specific skills assessments as they do have a lot of complexity and variation.  I agree you have the right ANZCO code and this is a job that is currently sitting in high demand and gets access to a lot of visa subclasses.

Clients often get fixated on PR and will initially only want to know about visas that will give them PR straight away.  Often though that isn't possible and designing a visa 'pathway' that steps from a temp visa (or sometimes visas) to a perm visa is the best solution.  For a young couple with no ties and desirable skills I'd tend to agree with the advice already given - come over on a WHV first (as much to see if you like living here as anything else!).  With that your partner can apply for jobs with his skills and - with a little luck - collect one with an employer who will then sponsor a visa.  As always temp visas, even those with pathways, carry some risk of changes to legislation.

As an aside any kind of Federal Government security clearance needs Citizenship, in my experience (State clearances may be different).  So it is possible that work in this field might routinely need the ability to pass a baseline clearance, which might be why the requirement in the job ads.  But once over here you can chat to employers and see how firm that need is, or if they can bring you on and keep you on Commercial work only or whatever.     

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On 14/06/2024 at 19:50, Beth Harper said:

Sorry I should have mentioned, they state Australian citizen or permanent residency, which we will have. 

I'd be surprised if that's a legal requirement for non-government work, and as Andrew suggests, it may just be employers wanting to avoid fly-by-night applicants.  

Are you aware that there's nothing to stop you coming over on the WHV and putting your application in for the 189 as soon as you arrive? That way instead of waiting impatiently at home, you can be getting settled and starting your new life in Oz while you wait.

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13 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I'd be surprised if that's a legal requirement for non-government work, and as Andrew suggests, it may just be employers wanting to avoid fly-by-night applicants.  

Are you aware that there's nothing to stop you coming over on the WHV and putting your application in for the 189 as soon as you arrive? That way instead of waiting impatiently at home, you can be getting settled and starting your new life in Oz while you wait.

Thanks for your advice with this we appreciate it. We are going to have another look into it. We do have a cat, which ties us down a little bit. But it might be that we can leave her with family until we know for definite we can get PR. 

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9 hours ago, Beth Harper said:

Thanks for your advice with this we appreciate it. We are going to have another look into it. We do have a cat, which ties us down a little bit. But it might be that we can leave her with family until we know for definite we can get PR. 

Shipping a cat over takes a long time anyway, as you have to book quarantine months in advance, get injections etc.  So that sounds like a plan.

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