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Chortlepuss

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Chortlepuss last won the day on July 8 2018

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About Chortlepuss

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  1. Chortlepuss

    Still here and still feel the pull

    You will definitely lose the RRV if you don’t come, then possibly spend ages agonising that you missed the boat. To get the chance of living here permanently you have to take this option while it is open to you - unless you want your remaining life to be ‘what if’ There is a risk that you will not materially have the same lifestyle as you had in the UK. Australia is an expensive place. Does this drop in living standards really matter? I had a beautiful house in SE UK which we sold. Can’t afford an equivalent house here but we survive and as we’re older, don’t need a large house. You own a premium house that will attract premium rent - or a premium sale value. If you rent it, you will be taxed on income and you will pay CGT on it if you sell. Alternatively you could take all that money tax free and either invest in a decent place in Aus, or rent (tricky I know) while you make up your mind where you want to live. Then go back to the UK if it doesn’t work out, knowing you’ve given it a go but it’s not for you… Your house sale will force you to make a decision but be grateful you have options and have money. A friend is 60+ and going through the parent visa process - it’s agonising- she would kill for your RRV! I’m sure you will always miss your lovely house if you sell but chances are, you’ve outgrown it now and time for different adventures!
  2. Chortlepuss

    Still here and still feel the pull

    I think you’ve got yourself into a right state by over thinking and analysing! I currently own a tiny townhouse in a quite dull village in the south of England - they rent for £1500 per month (not mine - I’m a softie and keep mine low ). Yours looks like a luxury house with a sea view. It will command a top dollar rental I’m sure! Keep your house if you’re not sure…it will be jolly hard to get somewhere that nice again. Keep your house until you’re sure you can settle in Australia. Come over, get your citizenship, stay with your kids until you can find a rental - then rent anything, 2 bed unit if necessary (it doesn’t matter if it’s a bit rubbish - you still own a lovely house). Try to settle here, join in, U3A etc, see if you make friends/can bear the lack of culture. Keep your options open until you are sure. Many of us are worried about being left alone & unsupported. You have lots of options & are pretty well off. I’d support a lot of criticism of Australia that you have heard - but are you willing to tolerate it to be nearer your sons? I would love to grow old in the UK (for many of the reasons you’ve mentioned) and if my son didn’t have MH problems and need us here I’d consider it. I’ve made a decision to sell UK property and then spend money on travelling back when I want to and treating myself. Good luck but don’t burn your bridges until you are SURE - otherwise you’ll spend a lot of time in this forum!
  3. Chortlepuss

    Still here and still feel the pull

    Agree with Marisa - don’t bother with private medical insurance. I have given up my hospital cover (we are 59,65). It was costing an arm & a leg for cover and when I did need it the ‘out of pocket’ expenses were really high. I looked at renewing after I got work again but so much that I might need (e.g cardio) was excluded from basic cover and gold cover is a fortune if you’re older. At $300 a month or so, it’s easier to set aside that amount and use it for healthcare if you need it. A friend is going through breast cancer in the public system - her treatment from diagnosis onwards was swift & efficient. Yes, her waiting times were a little longer but it was more or less free and the surgeon was the same whether private or public. If you are high priority (cancer, stroke etc..) you will be treated swiftly. You can see a bulk billed GP so pay nothing for your Drs visits - bulk bill GPS are easily found here. But even a charging GP is about $35 after your Medicare rebate - not much to pay to see a GP same day!
  4. Chortlepuss

    Still here and still feel the pull

    Remember if you retire here on a UK state pension it is frozen from when you first receive it and with inflation galloping along that is a worry. I am in a similar situation to you but already here in Australia. Approaching 60, will have a fair income (nothing like Quoll’s)! But will live quite a compromised life because the things I like to do (travel, eating out, theatre etc) and healthcare are extremely expensive. I have a house in the UK which is tenanted - I don’t want to give it up because then I would have nothing to return to. Nonsense really but psychologically tough. Your post worries me enormously. I have grandkids probably coming in the future, a MH son who needs us. I chose to come to Australia enthusiastically at first and my hubby loves is here. I now miss the UK every day particularly as I get older and yearn for the comfort of home. If it were possible I would be based in UK, come for long holidays to see loved ones. Health is an issue of course and we don’t feel we can justify business class which makes the journey wretched. It’s tough enough here for the 100% committed or the ‘stuck’. Can’t you buy yourself a bit of time? Could you use the proceeds of your sale to buy a smaller UK base and use the rest for long trips/business class? Australia is a high income high expense country - whereas I think of UK as low income low expense (changing now of course). Equivalent if you’re working here in a highly paid job but challenging to live on UK income here.
  5. Chortlepuss

    Still here and still feel the pull

    I’m glad it’s working with the psychologist. I must like you be brave and do the same. I never thought my worries worthy of discussion before and am cynical re: the worth counselling can provide - or maybe a bit frightened of letting cat out of the bag? I do empathise with the worry re: your kids but think you could see it another way. I grew up in Brighton, UK a brilliantly diverse and interesting place and so grateful to have been there at that time to enjoy it all. But my daughter as a nurse could never afford to live in Brighton - she has a lovely house here. My son suffers from MH issues and has fantastic support here. My friend’s son in the SE UK has similar issues and no support. I would have loved them to have the social and economic opportunities I had but they don’t really exist now at home. Brighton is a rich persons playground now and Australia is going that way with the cost of housing even in Brisbane. I’m actually glad my daughter stayed at home and has no uni debt. I think it’s wicked how young people in the UK are forced to take in punitive debt to study. In Brighton they build luxury accommodation for students with car parking and en-suites! They are just cash cows. I long for home almost every day but am aware of it being a longing for a long lost place - still beautiful and I’d still go home if I could, but I can see that young people can thrive here, despite the mind numbing blandness that people like you and I abhor.
  6. Chortlepuss

    Still here and still feel the pull

    I have found that if I can get back home it fills up the tank and I too can tolerate ‘prison island’. Not that I ever celebrate on the flight home. My husband loves it here, my kids are here. I’m stuck & sadly one of those ones contemplating a lonely funeral on Australian soil. I think I’ll put it into my will to have my ashes scattered on the South Downs!. I own a small house in SE UK which is tenanted. I will probably do some dubious number crunching to see if I can convert it to a pied a Terre now I’m approaching retirement. Perhaps I should see if homesick Brits want to rent it for a stay - it’s in a lovely spot
  7. Chortlepuss

    Holiday house swap UK Brisbane

    It I joined a Facebook group called People like us. We’re in the Western suburbs (Oxley) but probably moving to coast (Redlands) at some stage. If you’re in London I’d think you’ll get heaps of interest from swappers - everyone wants to go to London! I hadn’t thought about people doing recce’s but that may be a possibility too…
  8. Chortlepuss

    Holiday house swap UK Brisbane

    Now we’ve retired I have joined a house swap site with a view to finding people in the Uk who might want to come to Brisbane for a few weeks or longer - maybe to have somewhere to stay when they visit relatives over here. Not sure if I’ll get takers as my house is quite ordinary without a pool. Has anyone here had relatives/friends to stay but not really had enough room to host them? I’ll be really interested to see if there is any demand for this or whether people would prefer to stay somewhere posh….
  9. Chortlepuss

    Stuck in ‘Paradise’

    Here in Brisbane the plot sizes get smaller and smaller but the McMansions built on them don’t! Huge 5 bed 2 bath houses inches from next door and with a tiny strip of yard at the back. We want to move to a smaller house with a bigger yard but these are snapped up by developers who concrete over every square inch. My dream is to plant a tropical garden but even with a reasonable budget, I’ve no chance!
  10. Chortlepuss

    Stuck in ‘Paradise’

    What a lovely post. I do chuckle when I hear about ‘immigrants’ in the UK and also view strong anti-British sentiment with suspicion. I loved it too (In Brisbane) at first - I wonder if that was cos I was on a temp visa and determined to make the most of it? Then we drifted into citizenship and it all became a bit real. Anyhow my sisters are dotted around UK and apart from gripes about weather are all doing very well. There are so many gorgeous places to choose from and I’m sure you’ll have a great time exploring! Meanwhile you can tick Oz off the list knowing that not much will change (except hopefully the Govt) in your absence
  11. Chortlepuss

    Tax on UK lump sum pension

    Thanks Alan Im taking the advice of a tax lawyer - just wish more of this stuff was in the public domain. It impacts so many people, happens on a regular basis and if even the ATO help desk aren’t across the rules, there’s not much help for most of us!
  12. Chortlepuss

    Tax on UK lump sum pension

    Thanks Alan I’ve now found info I need after reading up on article 17. My understanding is that for anyone with a defined benefits scheme, a UK tax free lump sum is taxed in Australia on growth in lump sum since gaining Australian residence. Regular payments from the pension can be paid gross in UK if a nil tax code form is completed informing HRMC that they are not UK tax resident and resident in Australia for tax purposes. Tax will be deducted at source from UK pension unless this form is submitted to HRMC. If tax has already been deducted by HRMC it can be reclaimed on this form. If this is the case, it’ll certainly save me a lot of complex spreadsheet calculations!
  13. Chortlepuss

    Tax on UK lump sum pension

    Updated to say resident in Aus full time for tax purposes. Edit button not working for me!
  14. Chortlepuss

    Tax on UK lump sum pension

    Citizen. There is a form on HRMC site to apply to have UK income paid gross where a full time tax resident of Australia. I asked the ATO about it and they said they weren’t aware of it (even though the form states it goes to the ATO). I get my UK property earnings paid gross so wondered if I could get my UK pension paid gross in UK and taxed only in Australia. Mind you the people answering my call weren’t aware of how the UK pension tax free sum was taxed in Australia (they told me on the whole sum and not just the growth component). It’ll get very complicated to apportion tax already paid on UK income across tax years so I wondered if there was a simpler way of doing it.
  15. Chortlepuss

    Tax on UK lump sum pension

    Is there an option to apply to HRMC to get all income from UK (pensions and rental) paid gross in UK and just pay the tax in Australia? I currently pay no UK tax on my UK rental (under tax threshold but have also completed form to get all income gross) but my upcoming pension income will put me over the UK tax threshold. At the moment I have UK and Australian tax returns so would be easier just to declare tax in Australia - Will UK get first dibs? Makes it tricky to calculate given non aligned tax reporting periods.
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