Guest kelly1

what about Adelaide ?

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    Guest kelly1

    Awaiting visa and thinking of moving to Adelaide early part of 2006.

    Family of 5, myself ,wife , son 11yrs, daughters 9 + 8 yrs old. Getting visa on TRA as a car mechanic.

    Have been reading the notes on the web page and nobody seems to be talking about Adelaide(or am I looking in the wrong place or is it that bad!?)

    Has anybody got some good info on the areas, schools etc?

    Also is there a main Hyundia dealer within the area as this is the dealership I have been working for the last 5yrs?

     

    Hoping to hear from anybody that can help.

    Tony

     

    Ps Should we be looking somewhere else like maybe Perth???

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    Guest heather

    I was wondering the same thing. My partner and I are wanting to go to Adelaide. The climate sounds great, but I'm beginning to wonder if there is someting wrong!!

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    Guest elsa215

    Hi

    we too are going to go to adelaide but as you say its all perth and melbourne etc. I'm sure it wil be ok. the climate and relaxed continental lifestyle is what we want. hope to go in 2006. However have never been to Aus but wanted to for the last 20 years. Its now or never. Heres hoping see you soon.

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    Guest Bradley
    Awaiting visa and thinking of moving to Adelaide early part of 2006.

    Family of 5, myself ,wife , son 11yrs, daughters 9 + 8 yrs old. Getting visa on TRA as a car mechanic.

    Have been reading the notes on the web page and nobody seems to be talking about Adelaide(or am I looking in the wrong place or is it that bad!?)

    Has anybody got some good info on the areas, schools etc?

    Also is there a main Hyundia dealer within the area as this is the dealership I have been working for the last 5yrs?

     

    Hoping to hear from anybody that can help.

    Tony

     

    Ps Should we be looking somewhere else like maybe Perth???

     

     

    Think you need to try before you buy! Not a good idea to think about kmoving somewhere you have very little knowledge of!

     

    But anyways Adelaide isn't that bad, nice climate, good roads, housing not expensive. Just a few employment problems and usual social problems (supposed to be pot capital of Aus lol) and aread somewhere has highest suicide rate in Aus. Good place for kids though and beaches aren't too bad.

     

    For me I'd say Newcastle area of NSW beaches are amazing, great climate, failry good employment figures. But to each their own.

    8)

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    Guest elsa215

    thanks for the comment bradley in life if you tried everything before you bought you would not progress.

    Also know many people who have gone over there and stayed and some have come back need to have a open mind and soak up the culture.

    :lol:

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    Guest kelly1

    If only somebody living/lived in Adelaide could answer our questions?!

    You have to remember that all towns have there areas with a bad name.

    Look at London!!

    Its just that we know these areas and are able to avoid. I am sure this is no different in Aus.

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    Guest majortom57

    Hello everyone, my wife has been sponsored by a company in Adelaide and we are about to begin the process.

    The reasons that we chose Adelaide is because I have family that have lived there for 40 years and they have never said a bad word about the place.

    Unfortunatly you get bad areas in all walks of life, but you get on with it.

    Let's not live up to our name as "whinging poms".

    Good Luck to all of you.

    Jim

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    Guest potatoes3

    Hi Tony

    We are heading to Adelaide too! We have found excellent info from the sa government - they are spending a fortune on literature for the likes of us and it covers everything jobs, schools, accommodation etc.

     

    Go to http://www.immi.sa.gov and you can get them to mail you a brochure pack. You can also do a virtual tour of some of the city sights!

     

    I can sympathis that there is not a lot of coverage on Adelaide as compared to Melbourne or Sydney but I haven't heard anything bad yet!

     

    We can't wait to go but we are waiting for the final visa approval - what stage are you at?

     

    Very best regards

    Lizzie

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    Guest potatoes3
    Hi Tony

    We are heading to Adelaide too! We have found excellent info from the sa government - they are spending a fortune on literature for the likes of us and it covers everything jobs, schools, accommodation etc.

     

    Go to http://www.immigration.sa.gov.au and you can get them to mail you a brochure pack. You can also do a virtual tour of some of the city sights!

     

    I can sympathis that there is not a lot of coverage on Adelaide as compared to Melbourne or Sydney but I haven't heard anything bad yet!

     

    We can't wait to go but we are waiting for the final visa approval - what stage are you at?

     

    Very best regards

    Lizzie

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    Guest Heathertoes

    We went to Adelaide at Easter for the first time and really loved it - it was so much cleaner, friendlier, and felt safer and we were made to feel welcome by all we met. Importantly for us our two children loved it and can't wait to get out there.

     

    For two weeks we drove around SA looking at various places trying to find somewhere we really loved - but we hit a problem - there were too many places that we liked so we came away without any sort of final decision. :?

     

    We did spend a week in Perth as well, but although that was lovely, we found it to be very sprawling and decided that the compact Adelaide was more our scene. Adelaide isn't as bustling but hey - with two kids who needs bustling! Can't say what its like elsewhere, but Adelaide is the place for us and judging by the number of people on the Adelaide Brits website we are not alone. They are so keen to expand that surely there has got to be enough jobs available - we certainly saw plenty of construction going on both in the city and the surrounding suburbs and that must lead to all sorts of jobs being required - from teachers to car mechanics!

     

    Anyway - that's our view on Adelaide.....

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    Guest Cookie

    Afternoon Tony,

    Just joined today and glad to find someone talking about Adelaide. My husband and i and two kids, 12 and 9 spent last summer over in Adelaide looking for the right place to live. It is a fantastic city with some lovely areas. The Barossa apealed to us, along with so many other places!! The thing that mainly appealed to us was the climate, and the fact that it was seasonal like the UK, but warmer!! We submitted our application in in early June and have medicals booked for next month. We are hoping to go over early March 06 as that is when Steve leaves the navy.

    Cookie

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    Guest HBEE

    I am an Australian, Adelaide born and bred, so maybe my views are one eyed.

     

    I am rather alarmed at the negative view many seem to be forming of this beautiful city. It seems there is crime here, but I have never seen anything, and tell me a place where there is none.

     

    We have beautiful weather. Warm to hot in summer and for the English quite mild in winter. Our average temp this winter was about 17C. We have beautiful beaches; white sand for miles, although if you are looking for surf beaches, you have to travel south for 50kms. (Not far in Oz). We have so many wine areas within 2 hours of Adelaide, you will be amazed, if you like wine.

     

    The SA Govt is currently doing a drive for skilled workers in England, but you all probably know more about than me.

     

    It is a great city, small and friendly and easy to get around. So, I hope this bit of info may help.

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    Guest shazrazmataz

    We ( that is hubby & 3 children) are heading to Adelaide as soon as we sell our house. We had our visa in June & we can't wait to get there.

     

    Hubby is a boatbuilder/repairer & has more or less got a job lined up.

     

    We have 'til next April to validate our visa & if the house doesn't sell soon we'll have to pop over for a holiday :lol:

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    Guest Liberty

    :D Hi Tony and everyone else, We are going to Adelaide too...in fact, hubby is already there and I'm stuck here with the children trying to sell the house! Boo!

    We went over to Adelaide for a reccie trip last June, before deciding whether or not to go ahead with our decision to emigrate. We loved the people and the city and surrounding areas are lovely, but we were surprised to find that things are not as cheap as we expected. That said, you still get a lot more house for your money than you do in the UK! Petrol has also risen a lot over the past year, so be aware that your £s may not go quite as far as they would have a few years ago.

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    Evenin' folks

     

    I too was born and bred in Adelaide and whilst it is a beautiful city, I wouldn't return there to live, despite my family being there.

     

    In my opinion it is a great place to bring up kids, but once the kids reach the age of looking for a job (assuming they are graduates) it is a bit lacking in career opportunities and this is the reason why you see so many young Adelaide people trundling off to Melbourne to pursue their careers.

     

    But, for the younger set of kids, say under 15, it really is a good place to grow up.

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    Guest bob and ginnie

    Adelaide is a great spot for kids . . . spacious city, good schools and three Universities, beaches, sports facilities, near enough to Melbourne and Sydney to drive, plenty of parklands for recreation and barbeques.

    I've lived in Adelaide many years, doing my matric here and going to University for a couple of years before dropping out and working for the Post Office. That was in the '70's.

    Ive lived in Perth (1972), Brisbane (1973), Auckland (1973) and Hobart (1981 to 1994)

    I've been many times to Sydney and Melbourne and also visitied Darwin on holidays.

    Adelaide has lots going for it. Originally coming from London and growing up in the quiet of village life in Warwickshire, I don't need the big city life (4 million in Sydney and in Melbourne). I don't want to sit in traffic for an hour or two each way and live in row after row of houses in the middle of suburbia. If I wanted "big city", I'd stay in London with Europe just next door and the Med only a short flight away!

    Some folks come from that lifestyle, are familiar with it and feel comfortable with it. Good on 'em . . . . just not for me!

    I brought my three kids up in the Adelaide Hills region (half hour drive out of Adelide city centre) where they'd ride their bikes and climb trees, look for lizards under stones and get muddy in the creek.

    Adelaide is the only "planned" city (built by Col. William Llight, British Army) in 1836 and has parklands all around the city centre, half a mile deep, and roads fanning out in each direction into the suburbs. This gives Adelaide its unique look and appeal, unlike every other city in Australia which just "grew".

    It is a city with about 1 million in population.

    On any day, especially spring and summer, you can drive casually thro' the city and see people enjoying the warm evenings sitting outside the cafe or restaurant at their tables with their coffee or tea. Pedestrians just saunter past going on their way, shopping in the eveing or off to the cinemas, etc. It is a very relaxed atmosphere. No guns, no violence . . . no Hollywood!

    I drive thro' the city and suburbs almost daily in my Post Office van and look at this scenario as a normal course of everyday life here. Driving around is a dream compared to when I go and visit rellies in London.

    The city centre and outlying suburban shopping malls have hundreds and hundreds of shops and department stores for just about all your needs. They are air conditioned in summer when things warm up.

    The climate is Mediterranean and Adelaide is on the same latitude as Tunisia . . . . so, if you've ever been to North Africa for holidays????

    Housing is affordable and most suburbs are within ten or twenty mins from the beach in summer-time, when you want to hit the waves to cool off after a hot day.

    South Australia's unemployment rate is below the national average and jobs are going begging in many trades and professions here.

    I could rave on, but I'll just leave it there.

    I have to smile when I read of folks thinking there's something wrong with this place. It doesn't have the critical mass of melbourne and Sydney with the rush and stress there, but it does have lots to offer families. Your kids may want to go to Melbourne or Sydney or even London to work for a while, but many come back along with lots of other Australians who are finding the other cities of Australia a more relaxed lifestyle for themselves and their kids.

    Horses for courses.

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    Guest Cal

    Lovely post Bob & Ginnie

    Thankyou, just strengthens our resolve to settle there.

    We have lived in Birmingham all our lives, and long for a less rushed, packed, living on top of each other type of life.

    We plan to settle down Aldinga way, or around that area.

    Cal x

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    Guest bob and ginnie

    Kelly!

    There are hyundai dealerships around the place. One dealership that springs to mind is Dutton Motors in Murray Bridge.

    You can live in Mount Barker with a 25 min drive along a deserted dual carriageway Freeway to Murray Bridge to work. . . . . that way you get the best of both worlds. . . . . Adelaide Hills country living and a cooler climate with work in the Murray Basin area.

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    Guest zibit_glass

    Gday mate i have ived in adelaide for 20 yrs.

    came here when i was 16 i gort maried to a wondeful lady judy.

    i got 2 kids 1 is 13 in july the other 11 april.

     

    adelaide is a great place to bing up kids i live in andrews farm/

     

    we built our house back in 1990 and are bout 2 build a double story place on a big block...

    trust me you will not reget it.....

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    Guest blackcountrygirll

    Hi there, we`ve been here 15yrs and love it, we came out here on our own leaving all family and friends back in the the UK, we`ve not been back there yet , but the time is coming when we will have to bite the bullet and go back for a holiday to see Freds mom who is 86yrs old and the 3 kids and our 2 grandsons, and the extended family on both sides. We have never regretted coming here not for one minute, we enjoy every day, and the sunshines most days (if only for an hour or two in the Winter), its good to get up in the morning and see clear skies and breathe clean air, Talk again soon

     

    blackcountrygirll

     

    Sheila

     

    :):):)

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    Hi all, I've just joined PIO and presently giving serious thought to moving to Adelaide in next few months. I have dual nationality and hoping to attend UniSA. My 15y.o daughter is not crazy about the idea, does anyone have any advice or 15/16y.o themselves who wld be willing to chat online with her? I'm looking at initially renting in Modbury, does anyone have any advice to pass on? Linda

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    Guest Guest9973
    Hi all, I've just joined PIO and presently giving serious thought to moving to Adelaide in next few months. I have dual nationality and hoping to attend UniSA. My 15y.o daughter is not crazy about the idea, does anyone have any advice or 15/16y.o themselves who wld be willing to chat online with her? I'm looking at initially renting in Modbury, does anyone have any advice to pass on? Linda

     

    Hi Linda

     

    Congrats on the dual nationality!

     

     

    You might want to the daughter site to this one...........

     

     

    PomsInAdelaide: South Australia Migration & Expat Forum

     

    :smile::smile:

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    Guest rayman1

    I've been to Adelaide and thought it very behind the times. Very grotty city and very brown landscape. I think people who can't get anywhere else in Australia go there because they want people there. Not the type of place to have lots of fun and excitement. I know friends who live there because they couldn't get to Perth, friends who stuck it for a couple of years and said it was so boring and the Australians have a saying for Adelaide. "You are born in Adelaide, leave then come back to die"! Saying that, the housing is cheap!!!

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    While Adelaide might not be the most exciting place in Australia for most young people a lot of older/family people are looking for different things and Adelaide might just hit the sweet spot for them. Often people are trying to balance traffic, jobs, house prices, weather, access to beaches, mountains, countryside, city life, cafes etc in a mix that suits their priorities so for some I reckon Adelaide would be perfect. I hear it is improving on the city front all the time as well.

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    Amazing how we all have different perceptions. One of my husband's sons lives in Adelaide as well as one of his sisters. We have spent some wonderful times there. I would have no hesitation in recommending Adelaide to anyone. Being surrounded by the Barossa Valley, with exceptionally good restaurants, and beaches. Glenelg is beautiful, nice architecture, the trams etc.

    Adelaide’s Rundle Mall in the city is a great place to shop. Considered the largest pedestrianized shopping mall in the Southern Hemisphere with over 800 shops and 14 interconnected arcades, cinemas etc.

     

    I would have thought one of the beautiful aspects of living over east is when the children are older and flee the nest in search of the bright lights, they havent got that far to go.

     

    Luckily we all have different needs and requirements but if you are looking for a quieter, beautiful area Adelaide will appeal to many.

     

    Susie


    Every picture tells a story!

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        Adelaide Pros
        Cheap houses A sunny, warm, Mediterranean climate with low humidity Lovely beaches Pleasant suburbs with easy traffic An exciting variety of excellent, inexpensive places to eat out Good public transport Attractive hills and national parks around the city The world famous Barossa valley lies just 60 km away Adelaide is Australia’s most affordable big city. Adelaide Cons
        Sea water temperatures are cooler than around Australia’s other cities, except for Melbourne. Some summer days are just too hot. Adelaide has higher unemployment and, on average, lower wages than other major cities in Australia. There are too many boy-racers on the roads.