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Guest Naiad

Intro from an Aussie

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    Guest Naiad

    G'day,

     

    Just joined this forum in the hope of learning of the experiences of other Brits moving to Oz. Not for me, I'm already an Aussie, but for my boyfriend.

     

    We're still trying to figure out the best way to tackle the problem but are looking at the Skilled Migration visa at this stage. It looks like it might be a tough way to go so it might not be the best option in the long run.

     

    I'll probably mostly lurk but I'm happy to answer any questions about Oz :)

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    Moneycorp

    Moneycorp

    G'day,

     

    Just joined this forum in the hope of learning of the experiences of other Brits moving to Oz. Not for me, I'm already an Aussie, but for my boyfriend.

     

    We're still trying to figure out the best way to tackle the problem but are looking at the Skilled Migration visa at this stage. It looks like it might be a tough way to go so it might not be the best option in the long run.

     

    I'll probably mostly lurk but I'm happy to answer any questions about Oz :)

     

    If you and your boyfriend have been together for 1 year + and can prove it, you should be able to sponsor him for PR in Australia. It's quite costly, about 1000 pounds once all the expenses are taken into account but there's no points system or anything. I suggest this route before anything else.

     

    Cheers

     

    Buzzy


    MELBOURNE SHORT TERM ACCOMMODATION - FURNISHED SELF-CONTAINED STUDIO APARTMENT AVAILABLE -

    walk to shops, beach and station. Ideal for new immigrants before you find a long-term rental. PM me for further details.

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    Guest Naiad

    Thanks for your suggestions. Unfortunately we don't qualify for a defacto visa. We've only been together about 5 months and we couldn't really collect enough evidence to prove it since I am on a tourist visa here so I can't work, open a bank account or do a lot of the other things that would help with verification.

     

    At this stage we're looking at either a spouse or prospective spouse. Even that isn't easy since I am still technically married to my previous partner (divorce will be through 10th Jan). So right now all we can do is bide our time and keep collecting what evidence we can towards that.

     

    Does anyone have any suggestions or advice of the kinds of things you can collect to prove a spouse or prospective spouse visa?

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    Guest Boomer

    Hi

     

    How old is your partner? When I first went to Oz back in 1997 I had the same trouble. I got a 1 year working holiday visa (I was 30) and then when in Oz went for the temporary 2 year visa. If your bloke is too old though this won't work

     

    Boomer

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    Guest Naiad

    Thanks for the suggestion Boomer but unfortunately that won't work. He's almost 32. Good thought though.

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    Guest Ian & Sarah
    Thanks for your suggestions. Unfortunately we don't qualify for a defacto visa. We've only been together about 5 months...

     

    Naiad,

     

    What's the rush? When does your visa expire for the UK? To be honest, it is hard supplying all the documents for spouse visa's (and we're married!). You need stat dec's from friends, joint bills/rental agreements/explanation of any seperations (anything more than 2 weeks apart)/copies of itemised phone bills showing that you were calling each other (if/when seperated).....the list is absolutely endless. And as I think you mentioned, you should only bother applying if you've been living together for more than 12 months.

     

    Hang around if you can, collect as much stuff as you can (even envelopes addressed to both of you) and then go for it. Has he been to Australia before?

     

    I'm Aussie and husband is English (together 4 years, married 6 months).....we're going through the process of applying but yeah it ain't easy. I;m sure we'll be fine but it makes you think.

     

    S

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    Guest Naiad

    I'm on a tourist visa at present. It runs out in mid-March so we hope to have something worked out by then. It'll be pretty tight but we think it can be done. I could always leave the country and come back again and then I'll have another 6 months but by then I'll be running low on money (because I'm not allowed to work on a tourist visa) so I'd rather not. Then there's the possibility that I wouldn't be allowed back in since I've already done this once.

     

    Can you tell me why you're finding it difficult supplying all the documents needed? Some things we simply can't get because there's a lot I can't do on a tourist visa (most of the things under financial committments). Obviously we're not going to be able to live together for 12 months either but I don't think this is critical if you're actually married.

     

    And no, he hasn't been to Australia before so that makes it really hard for us to find two Australian citizens/residents who know both of us. We know one but we just don't know that many Aussies (they're not exactly thick on the ground in the Brecon Beacons!).

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    Guest PaulWH

    Hi

     

    From what you were saying, I feel my girlfriend and I are in a somewhat similar situation. I am English, she is Australian, although she has a British Passport as she was born here. We have been together for over a year and a half, but we only lived together for Aug, Sept & Oct. of this year. I have been in touch with many agencies trying to get the best advice about which vias to apply for, but none of them seem to want to bother or help as it seems to much hard work for them.

     

    From what I've discovered, it may be your best bet to contact the DIMIA themselves, as all the agencies I have been in touch with aren't aware of a number of the less popular visas.

     

    Trying to find documentation is your best bet. Photo's, postacrds, phone bills (most mobile companies can send you back dated itemised bills, at a cost)

     

    I guess the Australian government only consider you have a real relationship is you live together, which for the rest of the world isn't the be all and end all.

     

    Just gather all you can, file everything in date order, and good luck

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    Naiad

     

    When my partner and I were planning to apply via the skilled migration route, I found a fantastic FAQ site with a great big list of defacto proof. I'll track it down and post it here asap. Some of the things I remember, that you might not have thought of include:

     

    -Cards to each other, birthdays etc.

    -Statutory Declaration from friends/relatives etc. There are standard forms available on various websites. Basically you get your mates to write out their understanding of your relationship to date. They take it to a solicitor for verification and then it is a recognised document.

    -Photos with date stamps on them are great.

    -Certified copies of your passports with any stamps for other countries, where you can demonstrate you went together.

    - Joint bills for utilities etc.

    - Joint rental agreements

    - Emails, letters etc.

     

    Hope this helps, I will find the rest and send them as soon as.

     

    Best of luck!

     

    Pj

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