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Guest fred

self employment

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    Guest fred

    hello all

     

    having been self employed since i left college I was wondering if this causes any extra trouble in skill assesment or any other area.

     

    Also what are the opportunities for being self employed in oz or if you apply on a skills visa are you expected to work for someone ?

     

    Any info at all would be greatly appreciated

     

    Fred

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    Guest Cal
    hello all

     

    having been self employed since i left college I was wondering if this causes any extra trouble in skill assesment or any other area.

     

    Also what are the opportunities for being self employed in oz or if you apply on a skills visa are you expected to work for someone ?

     

    Any info at all would be greatly appreciated

     

    Fred

     

    Hi Fred

    I can only answer the first part of your question.

    It just means that you have more paperwork to get together if you are self-employed.

    Hubby passed TRA and he is self-employed and has been for many many years.

    You need to find anything that can prove your self employment, eg - CIS cards, public liability insurance cert, letter and profit/loss sheets from your accountant if you use one, letter and copy of figures from the Inland Revenue, copy of any advertising, suppliers letters, refs from companies you have sub-contracted for etc.

    Any questions, just ask I'll be glad to help if I can.

    What is your trade by the way ?

     

    Good luck

    Cal x

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    Guest fred

    hi cal thanks for the reply, i build oak framed buildings from design to footings joinery and roofing etc. (on my own, bit heavy sometimes)

     

    My worry is that as i originally i trained at college as a furniture designer / maker my current ocupation is not directly linked although there was a natural progression to what i do now. (i do still make some furniture)

     

    Is diversity seen as a plus or minus !?

     

    Also I would idealy like to be self employed in oz, can this be done or is there an expectation that you will work for other people ? What is your husband going to do in oz

     

    ps what do you and your husband do and where are you thinking of going to?

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    Guest Cal
    hi cal thanks for the reply, i build oak framed buildings from design to footings joinery and roofing etc. (on my own, bit heavy sometimes)

     

    My worry is that as i originally i trained at college as a furniture designer / maker my current ocupation is not directly linked although there was a natural progression to what i do now. (i do still make some furniture)

     

    Is diversity seen as a plus or minus !?

     

    Also I would idealy like to be self employed in oz, can this be done or is there an expectation that you will work for other people ? What is your husband going to do in oz

     

    ps what do you and your husband do and where are you thinking of going to?

     

    Hi Fred

    Can't help with the training/working differences, don't worry about it too much though whichever agent you go with with help you with that.

    Hubby is a floor layer (vinyl,wood,tile etc) although for the TRA he is classed as a floor finisher.

    Agent did say that proving his training would be very important as he didn't have any certificates or the like. But we passed, our agent has an ex TRA working for him and hes brill.

     

    Hubby is hoping to stay self-employed as a sub-contractor he has contacted loads of flooring companies over there and they are desperate for good fitters, so they say, so it's fingers crossed that work won't be a problem. He said he won't mind doing a few jobs for nothing if it means he can prove his skills and get a foot in the door so to speak.

     

    I don't think you have to work for anyone else Fred, I havn't read it anywhere. We are going out on an SIR visa, so we will have to prove that we have lived in Adelaide for two years and hubby has been employed full time (I think its min of 30 hours a week), for at least 1 year. Then we can apply for PR.

     

    So Adelaide here we come, if DIMIA would just give us our visa, pleeeeeease :)

     

    Cal x

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