Sign in to follow this  
Guest Harry

Backpacking across Australia

    Recommended Posts

    Guest Harry

    This is the one thing that I have always wanted to do, backpack around Australia! I guess it is out of my reach now but has anyone done it?

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Moneycorp

    Moneycorp

    Hopefully in September 8) 8)

    Working hard and saving :D

     

    Always wanted to and now have the chance before settling down.


     

    TackleBox - Fishing Australia stuff.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Bet

    How is it out of your reach :?

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Harry

    Hi Bet,

    The wife won’t let me because she would want to come along as well, then this would leave no-one to look after the kids.

     

    It is one of those things that you wish you have done when you your younger, well I am only on my 30’s but it still seems I will not have the opportunity to give it a go. Still there are plenty years left yet to emigrate.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Bet

    Well atleast you are looking at other ways you can do it :lol: . My partner and I did do a bit of traveling when we were younger (okay we are now only 33 not old!!!! mainly around Euorpe, America and Canada, and we also though about what we could have missed, well wasn't the same opportunity to shoot of on your own 10 years ago, especially for a woman. We done a 6 week trip to Auz in 2002, was a bit rushed and a lot of miles were covered, but it was enought to show us that it was what we wanted, took us a year and half to get all paperwork together and get our visa application approved, but hey if we can survive the stress of getting through this then our new life in Australia should be easy, roll on Jan 06. :P:P:P

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Auspom

    I travelled around Australia last year and I would recommend you to save up £3000(Could be less but you want to experiance every thing) and go for it. Get a work visa and a cheap ticket (with return date window of a year) just get a travelling book on Australia plan your route. You met up with people in all the hostels and there are lots of companies that provide trips to see al the sights like Oz experiance tours. I would make sure you are not in Darwin in the rain season and go in land and work on the cattle farm/fruit picking farms for good experiance.

    East coast is most young people favourite to start with, then travel up the middle down the west. your route will change as you meet people so dont stick to it just go with the flow!!

    Travelling is the best experiance, worry about debts after! get good credit card!

    have fun

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Bet

    Good luck in Melbourne AusPom, landing on 21 March 2006.

     

    :D:D:D:D

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Boomer

    Hey Harry

     

    Take the kids with you!!! I travelled around Oz with the missus for 6 weeks by car. Had a tent and it was wicked. Travelled from Sydney down to Melbourne, Melbourne to Adleaide, across the Nullabor Plain to Perth up to Broome, Darwin back to Ayers Rock and back to Sydney. What a big place? 19,000 kms we did. Different prosepct with kids though but you meet heaps of people on campsites and they are generally cheap to pitch up on. Most campsites have cheap caravans to sleep in as well. We spent about £3k in six weeks.

     

    Go for it!!!!

     

    Boomer

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest Auspom
    Good luck in Melbourne AusPom, landing on 21 March 2006.

     

    :D:D:D:D

    :D:D:D Thanks good luck to you, you only live once so go for your dreams.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
    Guest bob and ginnie

    Sounds like Auspom is a seasoned traveller. I back packed from England in 1972. I never went back. It took me 18 months on the road across Europe and Asia to get to Fremantle off the old tramp steamer down from Singers, and I knew I'd made it. I had 10 quid left when I lobbed up on Australian shores.

    Since then I've been up to Cairns, lived in Brisbane, and Hobart and Perth, of course. I now live in Adelaide and went up to Darwin and the "Alice" (Alice Springs) in 2000. Sydney and Melbourne leave me both a bit cold and I have cousins in each city.

    Back packing is a great way to go. You just meet so many interesting folks on your trek, in YH's and hostels and working around the place. They are a mine of info to put you in the know and you never know who you end up chucking your swag in with. Someone might have an old bomb and is heading west 3,000 miles, so you help to pay the petrol cost and end up in WA instead of north in the tropics. Life can be just as much fun when you are spontaneous and don't plan every little agenda. That is pretty restrictive.

    I had my 2 yr old son and wife when we went around South Africa for a month, so kids are compliant. We just tented. The climate in SA was similar to Australia's, and tenting isn't a bad option in country towns along the way. In the cities, you have to get digs and meet other backpackers for fun.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now

    Sign in to follow this  

    • Similar Content

      • By Anna9879
        Hi Guys,
         
        I have a PGCEI, from the University of Sunderland, which was basically the same as a regular a PGCE course but the  12 week teaching practice was not done in UK, hence was not given QTS.
        I'm considering migrating to Australia and was wondering whether, PGCEI is recognised by AITSL? even though it doesn't have QTS status, its contend is the same and has more than 45 days of supervised teaching.
      • By Rbuk17
        Has anyone flow to New Zealand after their first year on a working holiday and come back to Oz on a tourist visa? If so how easy is it to do so/ are they strict on letting you back in? My WHV ends at the end of November but my mum and dad are coming for Christmas and new year to visit family so obviously want to be here with them for that.
        1. Can I book return flights from SYD to NZ? Will I get pulled up for not having a valid visa for oz when I enter nz? Obviously I'm applying for that when I get there. 
        2. Do I need to get a visitor visa for nz or not? I'm a UK citizen so says online I qualify for visa waiver but other sources say I need a visa for nz if I'm going there to renew a visa for another country? 
        Thanks in advance.
      • By Coupleinoz
        Irish and English couple, aged 33 and 29. Living in Melbourne for 4 years, we both met out here 3 years ago. Recently applied and granted permanent residency.    Our plan was to stay for another 2 years to get citizenship and then move back home to get married and start a family. We would then have the flexibility to move back to Australia in our late 30's / early 40's (e.g. when the children are ready for school).    The complication for us is the recent change from 2 years to 4 years to apply for citizenship. It makes decisions about where and when to get married, buy a house and start a family a lot harder.    We are also struggling with getting good, unbiased advice (for example; family want us back home, friends in Australia want us to stay etc). A lot of peoples point of view doesn't go deeper than the immediate, emotional layer and we need to try and move beyond this.    We would like some thoughts on two options we are currently working through:   1. Move back to UK or Ireland within the next few months, with the plan to return within the 5 yr return visa allowed with permanent residency. During our time at home we would likely buy a house and get married (maybe have a child or wait until we get back to Australia - tbc!). On return, we would be settling in Australia and get our citizenship this route. We like this option as our preference is to spend our 30's back with close friends and family. There is obviously a risk with this option that we would not return (and most of our friends believe we won't).   2. We stay for the 4 years and get our citizenship (at this stage we would be 38 and 34). After we get our passport we would likely head back to UK / Ireland for a number of years. During the 4 years, we would want to get married, put our savings down (e.g. buy a house or shares) and maybe even have a child. We would likely organise the wedding from Australia but go back to get married in the UK. On the plus side, we are here now and we will get to citizenship quicker. On the downside, we won't be able to spend these important years with friends and family.    Overall, we only know life as a couple living in Australia (as we met here). So although we love it, we don't know what a life would be like living back in UK or Ireland. Add in buying a house, getting married and starting a family during this time - and the decision gets more complex!   Thoughts?! What else should we be thinking about to help our decision? 
      • By Danielle lewsey
        Hi guys. Can anyone help explain a bit about the new skilled migration visas. I know there is a medium to long term skilled occupation list(up to 4 year visa) and a short term skilled occupation list (up to two year visa). If your occupation is on the short term list, after the 2 years that you are given do you HAVE to leave the country? As I know you can no longer apply for PR after this visa. What other options are there after your 2 years on this visa are up?