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Bodsy

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  1. Bodsy

    Brisbane here we come!

    Hi Sophie Just a quick word from an 'oldie' who emigrated in 1983 and has lived north of Brisbane ever since. There is lots of good advice on these pages. The North or South debate is a permanent issue around here. I prefer the north (find it less industrial and easier to negotiate) but I worked down south for many years - colleagues there couldn't conceive of living on the northside! I agree with others that it may take a little while to find the perfect place for you - so you may have to move schools for the children. However, you are arriving at the start of the last term, which finishes in Dec -- followed by the summer holidays. By the time school goes back at the very end of January you may have had enough time for a good look around. PLEASE don't worry about the wildlife - the spiders are generally harmless - even the enormous huntsman spiders which, I believe, are useful for catching other smaller insects. We have had more of a problem with ants, which descend in hordes on anything remotely edible - so we all keep our pest control up-to-date. In 36 years I have seen only one snake in the wild around here - and that was only a carpet python. However, the advice to avoid long grass and make a lot of noise is good advice. I understand, as others have said, that some more rural places + the western suburbs are likely to have more snakes. That's all for now - will add more later if I think of anything
  2. When we came to Brisbane 35 years ago, I came to the opinion that Australians will make you feel very welcome at initial meeting, but the friendship does not seem to develop very easily from there. After all this time I still feel the same. Having said that, the friendships I made in the UK were early marriage/kids type of friendships - the type that have a long history and are difficult to replicate after a certain age. When we return to the UK (which we do annually now that we are all reaching the 'dropping off the perch' stage of life) conversations seem to take up where they left off (as others have said) and the overwhelming feeling is of comfort - I feel that I belong and am not constantly labelled as 'different'. I think that is why many migrants mix with others from the same culture - they understand each other and feel that they can relax and feel at home. I am sure that many, many UK migrants feel settled and that they belong in Oz, but for other first-generation migrants it will always be something that they struggle with. I suppose that is why a number of retirees return to UK - a very difficult decision when children and grand-children are fully settled. However, I remind myself that our decision to emigrate in our mid-30s was not for our benefit, but for our children's future - and they seem happy and successful in their lives.
  3. Bodsy

    Living in Australia - What you need to know

    Hi there - just decided to join this site after reading it for a couple of years. 34 years in Queensland - originally from Sheffield in Yorkshire......... what can I add? Off the top of my head: (some may be Queensland specific) - schoolbags in Queensland are called 'ports' - the grassed part of what I would have called the back garden is called the yard - 'garden' refers only to the flowerbed - type part. Eg Someone with half an acre of land may say that they don't have much garden, but a great big yard. - I'm sure someone will have mentioned the 'Durex is sellotape" problem - although I haven't heard the term 'Durex' for many years now. - Australians are very particular about introducing everyone to everyone else (even though the meeting may be very brief). That's all I can think of for now Happy New Year to all - at least we get first shot at the fireworks, except for NZ - oh and Sydney and Melbourne, thanks to our lack of daylight saving !
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