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CaptainR

Ships Master / Ships Officer / Marine Pilot

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Thank you captain c.

appreciate the effort.


Ship's Master (231213) <23-Mar-2015: AMSA skill assessment submitted> <189 logged: 24-Dec>

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Free oral's prep ebook with 100's of questions at http://www.oralsprep.com (mainly based on UK orals but the content is also useful for AMSA orals, apart from the UK M Notices)


Ship's Master - Permanent Resident - PomsInOz Forum Moderator

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Well orals passed today, I'll put together an orals report for the Dropbox but to be honest it probably won't be very helpful. He pretty much just checked I'd heard of Aussie Legislation and then told me to stay in my job because there's no work! Not even any RoR questions!

 

Congratulations. I'd heard anecdotal evidence of some CoR orals being conducted in this manner prior to doing mine in Fremantle, so of course was somewhat surprised to have a full on examination. I think some examiners take a pragmatic approach based on your experience.

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Congratulations. I'd heard anecdotal evidence of some CoR orals being conducted in this manner prior to doing mine in Fremantle, so of course was somewhat surprised to have a full on examination. I think some examiners take a pragmatic approach based on your experience.

 

Yeah that sounds pretty similar to what occurred. I supsect that it being a Deck Watchkeeper CoR also had an impact as from an operational rather than management point of view things aren't hugely different


(ANZSCO 231215 Ship's Officer) <20 Feb 15 Applied for assessment><10 Apr 15-IELTS Speaking><11 Apr 15 IELTS Papers><24 Apr 15 IELTS Results Received><13 May 15 AMSA issued eligibility letter><04 Jun 15 Orals><09 Jun 15 Visa Medical><16 Jun 15 Skills Letter Issued><16 Jun 15 EOI Submitted><19 Jun 15 Invitation to apply received>

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Hi CaptainR

 

can you pls give me the list of questions asked as i too want to prepare prior giving exams for COR with AMSA

 

Thanks in Anticipation

 

Lloyd

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Was going through the skill sellect info on the immi site. It indicates ceiling value of 1000 for maritime transport professional (ANZSCO 2312),and invitations issued only 36. Does this mean that the visa is not popular with maritime professional or the immigration dept is issuing lesser invitation?

 

http://www.immi.gov.au/Work/Pages/SkillSelect/SkillSelect.aspx


Ship's Master (231213) <23-Mar-2015: AMSA skill assessment submitted> <189 logged: 24-Dec>

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Was going through the skill sellect info on the immi site. It indicates ceiling value of 1000 for maritime transport professional (ANZSCO 2312),and invitations issued only 36. Does this mean that the visa is not popular with maritime professional or the immigration dept is issuing lesser invitation?http://www.immi.gov.au/Work/Pages/SkillSelect/SkillSelect.aspx
Thats more then last year I think, the reality is that the process is long, arduous and expensive. Whether its compiling all of the evidence, flying to Australia for an oral which you may fail and need to resit, then the medicals, police clearances, IELTS and money spent on all of that and then the migration process. I think the entire thing including flights and setting up in Australia cost us $20,000, possibly more. Then once you arrive its the process of trying to get work, taking whatever you can, living in temporary accommodation and moving around. If you remain seagoing you have to sacrifice some family life for a period of time. Also to meet the points requirements its a very small window of opportunity where you experience is such that you get enough points and also your age is within the bracket, become too old, or have too little experience you can't make the points. It's a big gamble and with family it really shouldn't be underestimated. Opportunities exist in Australia, but its a small market and isn't so easy to break into. Areas are much more specialist, they want harbour masters, but only those with harbour master experience, they want pilots but only those with 'AUSTRALIAN' pilotage experience, they want DP officers, but only those with Australian ship experience and a DP Unlimited... It takes time and effort to break into it, but once you are in it's all worth it in the end. There are people who come on this forum who are clearly prepared to do the work and are motivated, they ask the right questions and just want a little bit of assistance and these people probably succeed. We also get quite a few who come and ask to be spoon fed the process, the oral information etc etc and I'm sure most of those never actually go through with it.

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Very realistic statement from the big guru of this forum.

 

Thats more then last year I think, the reality is that the process is long, arduous and expensive. Whether its compiling all of the evidence, flying to Australia for an oral which you may fail and need to resit, then the medicals, police clearances, IELTS and money spent on all of that and then the migration process. I think the entire thing including flights and setting up in Australia cost us $20,000, possibly more. Then once you arrive its the process of trying to get work, taking whatever you can, living in temporary accommodation and moving around. If you remain seagoing you have to sacrifice some family life for a period of time. Also to meet the points requirements its a very small window of opportunity where you experience is such that you get enough points and also your age is within the bracket, become too old, or have too little experience you can't make the points. It's a big gamble and with family it really shouldn't be underestimated. Opportunities exist in Australia, but its a small market and isn't so easy to break into. Areas are much more specialist, they want harbour masters, but only those with harbour master experience, they want pilots but only those with 'AUSTRALIAN' pilotage experience, they want DP officers, but only those with Australian ship experience and a DP Unlimited... It takes time and effort to break into it, but once you are in it's all worth it in the end. There are people who come on this forum who are clearly prepared to do the work and are motivated, they ask the right questions and just want a little bit of assistance and these people probably succeed. We also get quite a few who come and ask to be spoon fed the process, the oral information etc etc and I'm sure most of those never actually go through with it.

(ANZSCO 231213 - Ship's Master): COR Master oral Passed on 17-Mar-15, Final Skill Assessment Received 27-Mar-15, IELTS 10-Apr-15 (least 7, Overall 8), EOI submitted 21 Apr 15, Invited 24 Apr 15, Lodged 24 Apr 15, CO 10-Jun-15, Add docs sent 03-Jul-15, Grant 09-Jul-15

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Thats more then last year I think, the reality is that the process is long, arduous and expensive. Whether its compiling all of the evidence, flying to Australia for an oral which you may fail and need to resit, then the medicals, police clearances, IELTS and money spent on all of that and then the migration process. I think the entire thing including flights and setting up in Australia cost us $20,000, possibly more. Then once you arrive its the process of trying to get work, taking whatever you can, living in temporary accommodation and moving around. If you remain seagoing you have to sacrifice some family life for a period of time. Also to meet the points requirements its a very small window of opportunity where you experience is such that you get enough points and also your age is within the bracket, become too old, or have too little experience you can't make the points. It's a big gamble and with family it really shouldn't be underestimated. Opportunities exist in Australia, but its a small market and isn't so easy to break into. Areas are much more specialist, they want harbour masters, but only those with harbour master experience, they want pilots but only those with 'AUSTRALIAN' pilotage experience, they want DP officers, but only those with Australian ship experience and a DP Unlimited... It takes time and effort to break into it, but once you are in it's all worth it in the end. There are people who come on this forum who are clearly prepared to do the work and are motivated, they ask the right questions and just want a little bit of assistance and these people probably succeed. We also get quite a few who come and ask to be spoon fed the process, the oral information etc etc and I'm sure most of those never actually go through with it.

 

I'll certainly second that, I initially went down this route in the belief that a) it would be more straight forward than a spouse visa and b) that I'd be wanting to get an Aussie CoR anyway to work out here.

 

As I've done the research and gone through the process I've very much come to the conclusion I'd be better off staying in the job I'm in for a while longer yet! The costs involved are not trivial in any way, shape or form and the waiting periods can be ludicrous. Thankfully the end is in sight for me now, I'll be submitting my EOI as soon as the final assessment from AMSA arrives, which will be just in time for me to head back to sea for 3 months!

 

The only non DP work I've seen advertised is either Government related (and therefore citizenship is a requirement) or inshore, which requires me to have NCVS inshore tickets, something I'm considering doing during leave just to broaden the CV a bit but it's certainly no cakewalk. I know a lot of people on here are Masters, but there has been a few posts from people like me with the lower tickets and I'd advise them to think very hard as to whether it's the right move.


(ANZSCO 231215 Ship's Officer) <20 Feb 15 Applied for assessment><10 Apr 15-IELTS Speaking><11 Apr 15 IELTS Papers><24 Apr 15 IELTS Results Received><13 May 15 AMSA issued eligibility letter><04 Jun 15 Orals><09 Jun 15 Visa Medical><16 Jun 15 Skills Letter Issued><16 Jun 15 EOI Submitted><19 Jun 15 Invitation to apply received>

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I'll certainly second that, I initially went down this route in the belief that a) it would be more straight forward than a spouse visa and b) that I'd be wanting to get an Aussie CoR anyway to work out here.

 

As I've done the research and gone through the process I've very much come to the conclusion I'd be better off staying in the job I'm in for a while longer yet! The costs involved are not trivial in any way, shape or form and the waiting periods can be ludicrous. Thankfully the end is in sight for me now, I'll be submitting my EOI as soon as the final assessment from AMSA arrives, which will be just in time for me to head back to sea for 3 months!

 

The only non DP work I've seen advertised is either Government related (and therefore citizenship is a requirement) or inshore, which requires me to have NCVS inshore tickets, something I'm considering doing during leave just to broaden the CV a bit but it's certainly no cakewalk. I know a lot of people on here are Masters, but there has been a few posts from people like me with the lower tickets and I'd advise them to think very hard as to whether it's the right move.

 

I went through with the process and moved to Australia and I agree with your statement (and the prior statement).

 

I wouldn't recommend even thinking about this to 99.99% people: Unless you are single, have no children, can support yourself with significant savings, have actual relevant work experience and some very specific qualifications (and I don't mean Master 1) its pretty much a ridiculous path to take right now. Some people have actually done it and you have my full respect - however you really do have to commit to this process: for example it took me over 2 years just to get the visa (not even mentioning moving half way around the world then having to find work).

 

The Skillselect occupation ceiling for up to 1000 Marine Transport Professionals per year is in no way an indication of a high demand for marine personnel down here. A PR visa is not a 'golden ticket' which will guarantee you work in the Australian maritime sector.

 

This thread needs a bit of a reality check because at times it appears to encourage people to take some serious risks and waste a lot of their money/time. There is a lot more to this than simply clearing orals exams, AMSA and paperwork (which seems to be the main concern of people coming on here begging to be spoon fed everything). The orals shouldn't be a big deal - we have all done this before and should be able to pass without an issue. Your problems going to be finding work after you eventually arrive.

 

I know this will ruin some people dreams, but its just a reality. I'm on the ground here, I've been through the process and I know these things from experience.

Edited by PWA200

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I went through with the process and moved to Australia and I agree with your statement (and the prior statement).

 

I wouldn't recommend even thinking about this to 99.99% people: Unless you are single, have no children, can support yourself with significant savings, have actual relevant work experience and some very specific qualifications (and I don't mean Master 1) its pretty much a ridiculous path to take right now. Some people have actually done it and you have my full respect - however you really do have to commit to this process: for example it took me over 2 years just to get the visa (not even mentioning moving half way around the world then having to find work).

 

The Skillselect occupation ceiling for up to 1000 Marine Transport Professionals per year is in no way an indication of a high demand for marine personnel down here. A PR visa is not a 'golden ticket' which will guarantee you work in the Australian maritime sector.

 

This thread needs a bit of a reality check because at times it appears to encourage people to take some serious risks and waste a lot of their money/time. There is a lot more to this than simply clearing orals exams, AMSA and paperwork (which seems to be the main concern of people coming on here begging to be spoon fed everything). The orals shouldn't be a big deal - we have all done this before and should be able to pass without an issue. Your problems going to be finding work after you eventually arrive.

 

I know this will ruin some people dreams, but its just a reality. I'm on the ground here, I've been through the process and I know these things from experience.

 

Good, honest post here.

Well said.


Ship's Master - Permanent Resident - PomsInOz Forum Moderator

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PWA200 have you managed to find work yet?

Unfortunately my employer has just announced more redundancies for its Australian Officers and Ratings (added to the 7 let go a few months back, and quite a few resignations/retirements), but thankfully I've managed to hang on by my fingernails!

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PWA200 have you managed to find work yet?

Unfortunately my employer has just announced more redundancies for its Australian Officers and Ratings (added to the 7 let go a few months back, and quite a few resignations/retirements), but thankfully I've managed to hang on by my fingernails!

 

I haven't struggled to find work. However this is because I have the relevant experience and qualifications (i.e loads of DP time, extensive anchor handling, project vessels etc etc....). I was also aware of this before I migrated which many don't seem to be on here. Its clear what qualifications/experience companies want - its always advertised - and if you don't have this then there is no point migrating. Simple.

 

The questions within this thread are always about passing orals, 'send me ur questions plz' and paperwork etc........I think people who are even thinking of moving to Australia need to step back and make a realistic assessment of their employability before mentioning the paperwork. For example if you've been Master for 20 years on a bulk carrier your not going to get work in the offshore sector because you don't actually have the relevant experience (sorry but its true - been there and seen the consequences).

 

The government are clearly wrong with the 1000 person ceiling for Maritime Transport Professionals.

 

There is work, but as you said, it is very specialized and only suitable for a very few with specific backgrounds. This thread needs to reflect that - as someone mentioned $20'000 spent on migrating is a pretty bad investment if theres no job at the end.

Edited by PWA200

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I haven't struggled to find work. However this is because I have the relevant experience and qualifications (i.e loads of DP time, extensive anchor handling, project vessels etc etc....). I was also aware of this before I migrated which many don't seem to be on here. Its clear what qualifications/experience companies want - its always advertised - and if you don't have this then there is no point migrating. Simple.

 

The questions within this thread are always about passing orals, 'send me ur questions plz' and paperwork etc........I think people who are even thinking of moving to Australia need to step back and make a realistic assessment of their employability before mentioning the paperwork. For example if you've been Master for 20 years on a bulk carrier your not going to get work in the offshore sector because you don't actually have the relevant experience (sorry but its true - been there and seen the consequences).

 

The government are clearly wrong with the 1000 person ceiling for Maritime Transport Professionals.

 

There is work, but as you said, it is very specialized and only suitable for a very few with specific backgrounds. This thread needs to reflect that - as someone mentioned $20'000 spent on migrating is a pretty bad investment if theres no job at the end.

 

I don't think that the migration planning actually has anything to do with job availability or even states that there is a demand. Our profession is in no way unique like that.

I agree totally with the job situation, you have to have a plan and a back up, and a back up to the back up.

It's a massive undertaking as you've pointed out. I'll PM you what an Aussie employer said to me when I met up with him recently. Can't post it here.


Ship's Master - Permanent Resident - PomsInOz Forum Moderator

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I don't think that the migration planning actually has anything to do with job availability or even states that there is a demand. Our profession is in no way unique like that.

 

I think that's the key point, living here doesn't necessarily mean working here. The issues arise when the money you're earning overseas doesn't match up to your expected standard of living in Australia, a couple of years ago when the Aussie dollar was much stronger I'd have been better off working at McDonald's than being in a non-Australian sea job. Now it's much less of an issue though obviously having to pay tax is a pain, and there's the superannuation angle to consider as well.

 

As I've said a couple of times in passing, I was moving here regardless for personal reasons and working here would have been a bonus, hence this Visa. From speaking to friends back in the UK it seems that the offshore industry as a whole is going through a tough time with oil being as low as it is, but these things are cyclical and I'm sure that when oil goes back up as it inevitably will that things will improve on that front.

 

In terms of the ceiling for Maritime professionals, CaptainC is quite right, it's not just based on the job market. Having a pool of trained marine professionals living in your country is a strategic resource for a government, I'm sure if the world took a massive turn for the worse that the planning involves people driving ships!

 

 

Probably not relevant to my situation but I'd be interested to hear what that employer had to say to you CaptainC, but perhaps I'm just being nosy!


(ANZSCO 231215 Ship's Officer) <20 Feb 15 Applied for assessment><10 Apr 15-IELTS Speaking><11 Apr 15 IELTS Papers><24 Apr 15 IELTS Results Received><13 May 15 AMSA issued eligibility letter><04 Jun 15 Orals><09 Jun 15 Visa Medical><16 Jun 15 Skills Letter Issued><16 Jun 15 EOI Submitted><19 Jun 15 Invitation to apply received>

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Interesting post, the last few ones on the reality check. I completely agree with the members who have cautioned on the liabilities involved with the entire process. However, the concern raised only points towards the off-shore sector, which is only temporary as mentioned by pashtoon86. However, not sure if cyclical, as one cannot say what kind of political/economical games the big people (read OPEC/US/Russia) play. This is a global issue, I myself am a supt. with an offshore OSV company in Singapore, and its the same here. I am not even considering sailing, but for people who are in the offshore sector, I would think this is the perfect time to start the process, considering it takes a year or two. As by then the market would definitely start an upward trend, if it fails to do so, then in any case you would be in trouble no matter which corner of the world you are in. It is only prudent to take a calculated risk, so the risk does exist, depends how much can you sustain. As for me I would consider it as an investment, based on the little research & job hunting I managed so far, employers have bothered to reply to my applications indicating PR is something that would give gravity to my application. I rather have the visa handy in an event an opportunity arises.

Besides, there would be many other career options seafarers could consider ashore, like drybulk (chartering/brokering/operations), container industry, teaching/training etc. It would be helpful if someone could share some of their thoughts on these too.

Once again thank you to all the experienced members who have been providing feedback and assistance, be it the visa process, the orals or their view on the job market.


Ship's Master (231213) <23-Mar-2015: AMSA skill assessment submitted> <189 logged: 24-Dec>

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It's a tough one, for the shore jobs they are also less then before. When I started the process in 2012 I do think that more jobs such as Pilotage, Surveyor, Lecturer, Marine Superintendent and Harbour Master were advertised, they seem to have all but dried up. The offshore industry is a good gauge of everything here, because it probably supplies the most Australian Master Mariners then any other sector, and is the most buoyant for Australian seafarers. What also needs to be factored in is that New Zealand also trains a lot of seafarers who automatically have living and working rights in Australia, and are able to apply for jobs here, an increasing amount of whom have large passenger ship experience which is popular for pilotage.

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Dear Senior members,

 

I have a problem in filling EOI.

As per AMSA assessment letter, i have work experience of 6 years but when i fill my EOI, it is showing 41 months(sea time). With this, i am not able to claim 60 points. I have worked with 5 different companies as a free lancer from 2008 till date.

I have contacted many MARA agents agents in Delhi but they are unaware of seafarer filling procedures.

If anyone can throw some light on this asap will be highly obliged.

Thanks.

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Hi all,

 

Well I have my assessment from AMSA now, and my EOI has been submitted with a total of 65 points. So now we play the waiting game. Especially with the seemingly random allocation of invitations and grants going on at the moment. Time will tell I guess.

 

Oddly they gave me 3 years for work experience, give that I didn't get my Merchant Ticket until 2013, they've either allowed some of the cadet time, or they've given me some credit for being at sea in my previous career. Very strange, but I'm not complaining as it bumps up the score! Thanks to all here for the assistance along the way. I'll keep you posted!


(ANZSCO 231215 Ship's Officer) <20 Feb 15 Applied for assessment><10 Apr 15-IELTS Speaking><11 Apr 15 IELTS Papers><24 Apr 15 IELTS Results Received><13 May 15 AMSA issued eligibility letter><04 Jun 15 Orals><09 Jun 15 Visa Medical><16 Jun 15 Skills Letter Issued><16 Jun 15 EOI Submitted><19 Jun 15 Invitation to apply received>

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Hi all,

Just received my assessment letter. Planning to book for my orals at Fremantle . I believe Form 419 + the assessment letter should be fine, as all the suporting documents are with AMSA anyways. Please correct me if otherwise.


Ship's Master (231213) <23-Mar-2015: AMSA skill assessment submitted> <189 logged: 24-Dec>

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Dear Senior members,

 

I have a problem in filling EOI.

As per AMSA assessment letter, i have work experience of 6 years but when i fill my EOI, it is showing 41 months(sea time). With this, i am not able to claim 60 points. I have worked with 5 different companies as a free lancer from 2008 till date.

I have contacted many MARA agents agents in Delhi but they are unaware of seafarer filling procedures.

If anyone can throw some light on this asap will be highly obliged.

Thanks.

 

When it comes to the actual visa, its all about evidence. If you have freelanced it may be incredibly difficult with the gaps, despite the letter from AMSA. Generally company letters should say "xx was employed from 1st June 2010 until 2nd November 2014 and served on the following ships: ", so that includes a total time in employment and then a breakdown of ships worked on and individual dates. Without company letters staying total time in employment which adds up to the 6 years then you will need to find another way to provide evidence to supporter your application. Immigration may take the AMSA assessment letter on face value, however I think that they will want the company letters to tally.

 

The visa process is all about evidence.

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Hi all,

Just received my assessment letter. Planning to book for my orals at Fremantle . I believe Form 419 + the assessment letter should be fine, as all the suporting documents are with AMSA anyways. Please correct me if otherwise.

 

You can call Fremantle office and book the Orals over the phone. Complete 419 and take it with you as well as all of your original certificates and they'll put the application for the CoR together while you're there.

 

I don't know if it's the same at Fremantle, but at Brisbane I paid the Orals fee over the phone by credit card and then paid the CoR application fee while I was in the AMSA office.

 

One thing to note is that they need to have the Seafarers Certificate of Medical Fitness before the application goes to Canberra, so I would suggest organising this for the day (or a couple of days) before your Orals.


Ship's Master - Permanent Resident - PomsInOz Forum Moderator

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Hi all,

 

Well I have my assessment from AMSA now, and my EOI has been submitted with a total of 65 points. So now we play the waiting game. Especially with the seemingly random allocation of invitations and grants going on at the moment. Time will tell I guess.

 

Oddly they gave me 3 years for work experience, give that I didn't get my Merchant Ticket until 2013, they've either allowed some of the cadet time, or they've given me some credit for being at sea in my previous career. Very strange, but I'm not complaining as it bumps up the score! Thanks to all here for the assistance along the way. I'll keep you posted!

 

Be careful with over-claiming points.

It's not up to AMSA to have the final say on your work experience, DIBP will do their own assessment. AMSA's is only an opinion. However, also being a government agency would throw some weight onto the claim.

If you'd have at least 60 points if you got bumped back down again then that should be ok, but if not then don't risk it.


Ship's Master - Permanent Resident - PomsInOz Forum Moderator

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Be careful with over-claiming points.

It's not up to AMSA to have the final say on your work experience, DIBP will do their own assessment. AMSA's is only an opinion. However, also being a government agency would throw some weight onto the claim.

If you'd have at least 60 points if you got bumped back down again then that should be ok, but if not then don't risk it.

 

Ah just when I thought it was all simple from here on out, thanks for the heads up though. I'd still have 60 points anyway without that so its not a big deal, but I figure I've put that down in good faith based on what AMSA have said so I can't really be penalised too badly for it. We shall just have to see I guess.


(ANZSCO 231215 Ship's Officer) <20 Feb 15 Applied for assessment><10 Apr 15-IELTS Speaking><11 Apr 15 IELTS Papers><24 Apr 15 IELTS Results Received><13 May 15 AMSA issued eligibility letter><04 Jun 15 Orals><09 Jun 15 Visa Medical><16 Jun 15 Skills Letter Issued><16 Jun 15 EOI Submitted><19 Jun 15 Invitation to apply received>

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