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Guest WAintheUK

What to expect from relocation...

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Guest WAintheUK

First of, apologies if this is the wrong place for this thread.

 

2 Years ago, I met my lovely Cornish girlfriend while working in WA, where i'd spent all my life. Never thought about moving to the UK before but we've talked and its something Im looking at, now im doing a bit of research on the actuals...

 

As I said, I was from Perth, grew up in the South West and now im in Tasmania.

I work in Construction/Project Managment, and enjoy Aussie Rules and Golf. Nothing too unusual really. Im obviously used to the pricing/marketing over here and grew up on Bunnings and Holdens, beaches and bars :wink:

But Im ready to move on and have had the itch and desire to 'spread my wings' (metaphorically speaking) for a little while now.

With the experience of both address's, I figured people who had left the UK, come to AUS and gone back might have a unique perspective on the idea!

Im open minded and can handle new new names for business's, different TV and the general changes, but are there a few major ones I might not realise until im there...

 

How differant IS the day to day life and around the town/village/suburb??

 

Would love any help you can provide, Thankyou! :smile:

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First of, apologies if this is the wrong place for this thread.

 

2 Years ago, I met my lovely Cornish girlfriend while working in WA, where i'd spent all my life. Never thought about moving to the UK before but we've talked and its something Im looking at, now im doing a bit of research on the actuals...

 

As I said, I was from Perth, grew up in the South West and now im in Tasmania.

I work in Construction/Project Managment, and enjoy Aussie Rules and Golf. Nothing too unusual really. Im obviously used to the pricing/marketing over here and grew up on Bunnings and Holdens, beaches and bars :wink:

But Im ready to move on and have had the itch and desire to 'spread my wings' (metaphorically speaking) for a little while now.

With the experience of both address's, I figured people who had left the UK, come to AUS and gone back might have a unique perspective on the idea!

Im open minded and can handle new new names for business's, different TV and the general changes, but are there a few major ones I might not realise until im there...

 

How differant IS the day to day life and around the town/village/suburb??

 

Would love any help you can provide, Thankyou! :smile:

 

 

I think i may be able to help .......the 2 countries are NOTHING alike for a start .

Oz is a young , country with masses of space .....great weather ( thats debatable ) , and a general optimistic outlook .

England is a country with a history over 1000 yrs old ....its over populated ....the weathers changeable , its broke .....but we dont care ....christmas is coming ....shops are doing ok ....pubs are full.

its close to europe .....and europe and the U.K ,have more places per square mile than anywhere on the planet to keep you occupied .....and the people are generally genuine , thats not saying ozzies arent.

I had an afternoon with Brummies and scousers yesterday .....LAUGH ....i was crying .

There was an english guy with us , who lives in Germany .....he said " thats what i miss "

I may say iam skint .....i may say iam cold .......but i never say iam BORED.

 

ps stay away from the cities


BUT I DONT FEEL AFRAID

AS LONG AS I GAZE AT

WATERLOO SUNSET

IAM IN PARADISE

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I think i may be able to help .......the 2 countries are NOTHING alike for a start .

Oz is a young , country with masses of space .....great weather ( thats debatable ) , and a general optimistic outlook .

England is a country with a history over 1000 yrs old ....its over populated ....the weathers changeable , its broke .....but we dont care ....christmas is coming ....shops are doing ok ....pubs are full.

its close to europe .....and europe and the U.K ,have more places per square mile than anywhere on the planet to keep you occupied .....and the people are generally genuine , thats not saying ozzies arent.

I had an afternoon with Brummies and scousers yesterday .....LAUGH ....i was crying .

There was an english guy with us , who lives in Germany .....he said " thats what i miss "

I may say iam skint .....i may say iam cold .......but i never say iam BORED.

 

ps stay away from the cities

 

Great post very true - countryside is beautiful though and shopping great, TV good and shows festivals etc all over the place you definitely don't need to be bored here. Just need good layers, a good hat and boots in the coldest months.

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Guest

My husband, an Aussie often metions the one thing he really misses is the 'big sky' and that we just don't have that here in Europe. And having been in Aus also, I know exactly what he means.

 

There are big differences, but in all honesty its probably not those that will jar so much for you. It'll be the little day to day things.

 

If you are heading back to Cornwall then be prepared for somewhere with poor employment prospects and generally a poorer standard of living to other parts of the south west UK. It is a seasonal county, relying on the tourist trade in season and many of the beachside towns and so on struggle in winter and are very different places to live then. Its stunning in places, in others its sparse and barren landscape. See it in summer on a good day in the right place, its wonderful.

 

I've lived rural in England for many years. Its different. Cost of living if you live rural is high and jobs are scarce. Hence people moving toward towns to live. We moved into a small town a couple of years ago and while its ok, I'd rather have the peace and quiet of the countryside around me again. But it can ne a hard life living rural especially in the winter.

 

Small town living is, well, small town living. The plus side (for some) is that being the UK its not that far to the next town usually and can be reached by car/bus/train inside of 15 minutes or so. And the largers towns within half an hour, 45 mins for many areas. There are not masses of sprawling suburbs like in Aus. A city ends, you drive through some countryside and then hit a small town, then another and another.

 

I think the one thing to be aware of is how hard it can be to make good friends. My husband has struggled in this area even though he is an easy going guy. He hasn't really got any good male friends he can go for a drink with or anything like that. Sure my friends get on well with him, he has met people via work and sports clubs and so on but they all already have their social circle and it can be really hard to break in to and develop your own independent friendships on anything deeper than a casual level. Hubby has good friends back in Aus and seeing how easy it was for him when we were back visiting last time, I realised just how much he must miss that living here. It is hard but he doesn't mention it often but he does feel it. I know if it were not for me (and now our son) he'd be back in Aus a long time ago. And one of the reasons we plan to return. He gave it all up to come here to live with me and now after 7 or o years is ready to go back. And luckily I am good with this :).

 

You can have a great time here for a while. You may like it, love it even, be happy here, but don't feel it has to be forever or put a time frame on it. The moment you do that things can unravel. Enjoy it for what it is and if you do decide to put down more definite roots here you can, but be prepared the lure of Aus may always be calling you somewhere deeper down.

 

If you and your GF are going to last long term, ensure you both are open and honest about your options of where you live and why. Relationships between people from the opposite side of the world can often be tricky due to where the people in them might want to live. Compromise is often reached but the toll it can take on relationships can be hard. If both of you love each country, or at least like living in the other persons one, it helps loads. Be prepared to be flexible and talk about the future with open eyes. Don't be blind to what it can entail.

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My husband, an Aussie often metions the one thing he really misses is the 'big sky' and that we just don't have that here in Europe. And having been in Aus also, I know exactly what he means.

 

There are big differences, but in all honesty its probably not those that will jar so much for you. It'll be the little day to day things.

 

If you are heading back to Cornwall then be prepared for somewhere with poor employment prospects and generally a poorer standard of living to other parts of the south west UK. It is a seasonal county, relying on the tourist trade in season and many of the beachside towns and so on struggle in winter and are very different places to live then. Its stunning in places, in others its sparse and barren landscape. See it in summer on a good day in the right place, its wonderful.

 

I've lived rural in England for many years. Its different. Cost of living if you live rural is high and jobs are scarce. Hence people moving toward towns to live. We moved into a small town a couple of years ago and while its ok, I'd rather have the peace and quiet of the countryside around me again. But it can ne a hard life living rural especially in the winter.

 

Small town living is, well, small town living. The plus side (for some) is that being the UK its not that far to the next town usually and can be reached by car/bus/train inside of 15 minutes or so. And the largers towns within half an hour, 45 mins for many areas. There are not masses of sprawling suburbs like in Aus. A city ends, you drive through some countryside and then hit a small town, then another and another.

 

I think the one thing to be aware of is how hard it can be to make good friends. My husband has struggled in this area even though he is an easy going guy. He hasn't really got any good male friends he can go for a drink with or anything like that. Sure my friends get on well with him, he has met people via work and sports clubs and so on but they all already have their social circle and it can be really hard to break in to and develop your own independent friendships on anything deeper than a casual level. Hubby has good friends back in Aus and seeing how easy it was for him when we were back visiting last time, I realised just how much he must miss that living here. It is hard but he doesn't mention it often but he does feel it. I know if it were not for me (and now our son) he'd be back in Aus a long time ago. And one of the reasons we plan to return. He gave it all up to come here to live with me and now after 7 or o years is ready to go back. And luckily I am good with this :).

 

You can have a great time here for a while. You may like it, love it even, be happy here, but don't feel it has to be forever or put a time frame on it. The moment you do that things can unravel. Enjoy it for what it is and if you do decide to put down more definite roots here you can, but be prepared the lure of Aus may always be calling you somewhere deeper down.

 

If you and your GF are going to last long term, ensure you both are open and honest about your options of where you live and why. Relationships between people from the opposite side of the world can often be tricky due to where the people in them might want to live. Compromise is often reached but the toll it can take on relationships can be hard. If both of you love each country, or at least like living in the other persons one, it helps loads. Be prepared to be flexible and talk about the future with open eyes. Don't be blind to what it can entail.

 

I love this post because almost everything in it could be said of regional Australia and also the same re friendships. Work is scarce in many parts of Oz and the landscape can also be very bleak - of course it can also be glorious just like UK. I do think the english are a bit more reserved about making friends initially and there's nothing like your old muckers who know you from back then. I made great friends in Oz but I am as close to a professional friend maker as you can get. But coming home to my old friends was great too. I think its great you appreciate your husbands desire to go home and will go with him and as you say nothing has to be forever.

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I think i may be able to help .......the 2 countries are NOTHING alike for a start .

Oz is a young , country with masses of space .....great weather ( thats debatable ) , and a general optimistic outlook .

England is a country with a history over 1000 yrs old ....its over populated ....the weathers changeable , its broke .....but we dont care ....christmas is coming ....shops are doing ok ....pubs are full.

its close to europe .....and europe and the U.K ,have more places per square mile than anywhere on the planet to keep you occupied .....and the people are generally genuine , thats not saying ozzies arent.

I had an afternoon with Brummies and scousers yesterday .....LAUGH ....i was crying .

There was an english guy with us , who lives in Germany .....he said " thats what i miss "

I may say iam skint .....i may say iam cold .......but i never say iam BORED.

 

ps stay away from the cities

 

Spot on. Each country is its own and has different things going for it. It comes down to what you want in life - at least I think.

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Day to day, you'll be fine, expect a few differences, embrace change, and get on with your new life.

 

The major difference is that you won't be able to communicate so easily with your family and friends. It's all very well to say that you can use Skype etc, but the time difference plays havoc with that. UK evening, Oz is asleep, OZ evening, UK is at work, and at the weekend people are often out and about. So while you will be able to organise times to speak to home occasionally, you'll have lost the spontaneous communications. This does take some getting used to.

 

You also will miss out on major milestones of your family and friends, because you simply can't fly back for every wedding etc. When you're in the same country, you can fly for the weekend if necessary. When these events are happening on the other side of the world, and it take over 24hrs travel, that's just not possible anymore. While you probably understand that, your friends always seem to think that "their" event will be the one that you're able to make, so you will end up with disappointed friends.

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Pragmatic question - have you worked out what visa you are going to come to UK on so that you are able to work and stay if you like it?

 

Moving anywhere is going to take adjustment - at the moment, the thing bugging my Aussie husband is that he cant work in the garden past 4pm because of the early winter nights. I probably wont see him until midnight in the summer though LOL (we are now living in UK quite out of the blue)

 

Friendships take work and you are probably never going to get them as good as the ones you have forged over significant developmental periods in your life but my DH has been surprised at the connections he has already made here (gym, cycling, gardening etc) in just a short while and he has commented on how friendly people have been to him - he isnt the most outgoing of people either so friendships are hard for him.

 

You probably dont need to go to Cornwall - it might be better for your relationship to be just far enough away from her folks that it is you and her against the world - go where you can get work for starters (nowhere is that far from Cornwall!!!!)

 

I agree with the communication difficulties with your family and friends - it's difficult at the moment but OTOH a successful move probably means that you wont want to spend too much time on the phone/Skype/Facebook anyway because constantly reminding you of what you are missing isnt going to help you get out into your new community and make your links there. We had one son return to UK almost 10 years ago now and TBH we are lucky if we get a text once a month. He knows where we are, he emails if he feels the need, phones if he fancies it (maybe once or twice a year on birthdays) and he is happy as larry - has a great job, just got married, bought a house .... doesnt really have much to do with his Australian past at all now and after his last holiday when he was itching to get back to London and HIS life, I doubt he will be coming for holidays much any more either (too many other fabulous places he enjoys going to, far closer to UK)

 

Have a great time and enjoy the experience. My son's mantra is snitched from the Beatles - life is what happens when you are busy making plans - and when he left Australia he could not, in his wildest dreams, have imagined that things would turn out as they have - so go with an open mind and have a ball!

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Guest jtrd

I came to the UK nearly 15 years ago for a year to work - how things change! I had an absolute ball, travelled, met loads of great people, went home after my year and hated it - I lasted 6 weeks before I was on the plane back to the UK. I stayed for another 12 months and then took my 'souvenir' home with me. Despite getting married and having a baby I still couldn't settle and just wanted to be back in the UK, much to my British hubby's horror.

 

At my insistence we moved back to the UK (I loved it, he hated it). All was going brilliantly until my hubby talked me into going to Aust for a holiday, in 5 years I hadn't felt the need to go back at all. We flew Qantas and as we were coming in to land, they played "I still call Australia home" - cant explain it but I was in floods of tears, my hubby took one look at me and said " who are you and what have you done with my wife?". I loved being home, I loved being able to watch AFL, go through a drive through, buy Farmers Union Iced Coffee, burger rings, BBQ shapes, tim tams and cherry ripes whenever I wanted. I loved that the sky and clouds were so far away and not feel as though they were pressing ever closer. I loved that if I said "I need a bandaid" people knew what I meant and didn't give me funny looks (don't necessarily think we speak the same language because in so many instances we just don't).

We are finally moving back home now and while I can't wait for all of the things mentioned above and so much more, it is with slight regret that I will be leaving the UK. IMO it was once a great country, but in the last 10 years things have certainly changed and I no longer want to raise my children here. The flip side is of course, if you're young, can get a job and earn a decent wage it is a fantastic place to travel around and travel from, you will get to see and experience things here that you would never get to in Australia.

Do it and enjoy the adventure!

Best of luck to you!

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Guest ksc2303

I'm from Perth also, grew up there for most of my life - up until I was 22. I met my boyfriend in Perth and he is from the UK so when his visa ran out I went to the UK with him (I'm a dual citizen). It is quite a bit different over there, from my opinion anyway. lots of pros and cons but at the end of the day after everything I would never choose to move back to Perth. We moved over to Melbourne 6 months ago after 18 months i the UK thinking it would be where we would settle though we have come to the decision that the UK suits us better so we are arranging to move back. I found that finding work was ALOT tougher than back in Perth. Usually if I applied for jobs in perth I would get an offer from 1 out of 2 jobs I applied for where as in the UK I applied for around 50 jobs and barely got a response. It was quite upsetting and disheartening though I managed to register with a temp agency and had bits of work here and there which suited me at the time. I also found that there are lots of extra charges I had never heard of before, like TV licenses..! was quite surprised at that one. Also when you're renting you need to cover the council taxes. Parking at shops was a bit of an issue as they charge to park at the shopping centre's at a lot of the places I visited where as Perth you only pay for parking in the CBD. I know I am only going on about the bad things but to be honest the UK is a beautiful country and I am longing to go back! I hope the job situation is a bit better than it was though a bit doubtfull on that one. To be honest, Perth was a bit dull for my liking, there are so many things to do and see in the UK, also visiting Europe is really cheap and a really short flight. Hope my insight has helped!

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