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Guest danpuel

Law Degree - what are my options?

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Guest danpuel

Hi everyone,

 

I will be graduating next year with an English law degree (hopefully getting a 2.1) and I want to know what my options are vis-a-vis immigration to Oz.

 

Anyone out there with knowledge specific to law/other similar areas able to tell me what I should be doing after my degree to enhance my chances of getting a visa for permanent residence in Australia?

 

Thanks!

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Hi everyone,

 

I will be graduating next year with an English law degree (hopefully getting a 2.1) and I want to know what my options are vis-a-vis immigration to Oz.

 

Anyone out there with knowledge specific to law/other similar areas able to tell me what I should be doing after my degree to enhance my chances of getting a visa for permanent residence in Australia?

 

Thanks!

 

Undertake some relevant work experience.


Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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Guest Bob Tonnor

Hi there

 

I am not 100% sure on this but i think you may have to undertake further training when you get here depending on what type of work you decide to take up, there are basically eight states, including territories and each have different state laws. Then there is Federal law, so it kind of depends on where your going to live and what area you decide to practice, but first is the 2 year working under a practicing legal professional period.

 

Hope that helps

 

Bob

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Guest danpuel
Hi there

 

I am not 100% sure on this but i think you may have to undertake further training when you get here depending on what type of work you decide to take up, there are basically eight states, including territories and each have different state laws. Then there is Federal law, so it kind of depends on where your going to live and what area you decide to practice, but first is the 2 year working under a practicing legal professional period.

 

Hope that helps

 

Bob

Hi,

 

thanks for getting back to me!

 

I think you're right that i'd need to retrain slightly to bring my knowledge of law up to speed with Aussie law but that would only be the case if I were to first qualify as a solicitor over here.

 

To qualify as a solicitor over here in the UK i'd need to spend about £10k after my degree studying what's called a Legal Practice Course then I'd need to find a law firm that'd train me for 2 years.

 

Due to the expense of the above route as well as how long it'd take to complete, I am more interested in learning about the other options I could pursue to get me into Oz, not necessarily in law, although law's fine if it helps, but literally any route that'd would take less than 3 years and cost less than £10k (i'll need my savings to get through the immigration application).

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Guest sdhway

Hi DanPuel,

 

I am currently in my 3rd year of LLB in Scotland and looking to emigrate to Aus. I am wondering whether it would be best to head out straight after the degree, first do the diploma in legal practice and then head out, or finish the proceeding traineeship and then trying to head out!!?

 

Basically if you have any idea whether my degree is any use in Aus without the diploma and traineeship. My goal is to get settled and working full time in Oz ASAP!

Please let us know how you are getting on in your efforts to get out there! Also, are you looking to work as a solicitor eventually or are you happy in any type of work??

 

Regards,

 

Steve

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Due to the expense of the above route as well as how long it'd take to complete, I am more interested in learning about the other options I could pursue to get me into Oz, not necessarily in law, although law's fine if it helps, but literally any route that'd would take less than 3 years and cost less than £10k (i'll need my savings to get through the immigration application).

 

You could go over on a working holiday visa. The WHV is only for a year (unless you go fruit picking or some such when it can be extended to 2 years) and only for people under 30 who've never had a WHV. The maximum period you can work for 1 employer is 6 months but if you show talent you might be able to get sponsorship from them. You could of course reduce the risk and contact Australian (or international) law firms from here in the UK to see if any would be willing to take someone on under a WHV. If it doesn't work out you'll be returning to the UK after a holiday gap year and can go back to the UK route of trying to qualify (and who knows the economy might have improved by then).


Chartered Accountant (England & Wales); Registered Tax Agent & Fellow of The Tax Institute (Australia)

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You would need to consult the relevant law society for the states you want to work in but I would say that unless you are fully qualified to practice in the UK and have relevant experience (at least 2 years PQE) you have absolutely no chance of practicing in Australia. You may may need to do the equivalent of the LPC here as well before you can practice so very little chance of a job until you have done so. All of the English lawyers at my firm are fully quialified. Getting a traineeship is hard enough for Aussie law grads so I doubt any Aussie law firm will even consider you.

 

My advice would be to do the LPC, get a traineeship and a few years PQE then decide.

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You would need to consult the relevant law society for the states you want to work in but I would say that unless you are fully qualified to practice in the UK and have relevant experience (at least 2 years PQE) you have absolutely no chance of practicing in Australia. You may may need to do the equivalent of the LPC here as well before you can practice so very little chance of a job until you have done so. All of the English lawyers at my firm are fully quialified. Getting a traineeship is hard enough for Aussie law grads so I doubt any Aussie law firm will even consider you.

 

My advice would be to do the LPC, get a traineeship and a few years PQE then decide.

 

Hi - have the English qualified solicitors had to do any form of requalification or do they just note on business cards / correspondence that they are English qualified? Many thanks, Jamie

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Hi - have the English qualified solicitors had to do any form of requalification or do they just note on business cards / correspondence that they are English qualified? Many thanks, Jamie

 

I think they have had toget Aussie qualifications and i think there is a conversion course via the College of Law. Each state is different though so contact the state Law Society

 

I know the requirements differ in each state but the LIV for Victoria webpage is confusing as it says on one page foreign lawyers can practice http://www.liv.asn.au/Practising-in-Victoria/Professional-Standards/Steps-to-Qualified-Practice/Who-can-practise-law-in-Victoria-.aspx but on another page says they cannot http://www.liv.asn.au/Practising-in-Victoria/Professional-Standards/Steps-to-Qualified-Practice/Registered-Foreign-Lawyers but I think this means they can practice foreign law but not Australian law.

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I think they have had toget Aussie qualifications and i think there is a conversion course via the College of Law. Each state is different though so contact the state Law Society

 

I know the requirements differ in each state but the LIV for Victoria webpage is confusing as it says on one page foreign lawyers can practice http://www.liv.asn.au/Practising-in-Victoria/Professional-Standards/Steps-to-Qualified-Practice/Who-can-practise-law-in-Victoria-.aspx but on another page says they cannot http://www.liv.asn.au/Practising-in-Victoria/Professional-Standards/Steps-to-Qualified-Practice/Registered-Foreign-Lawyers but I think this means they can practice foreign law but not Australian law.

 

thanks! i know that at times i've seen communications here in the UK from lawyers who have, for example, new south wales qualified in their titles. This may of course just be through secondments from within the global firms, rather than a more permanent change.

 

Only ask as i would intend to practice if we make a move, but preference is to stay in-house.

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