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millholl

The best future for our kids. Australia or UK?

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So we're going to Brisbane in December (me, wife and two girls 3 & 5) and we're wondering if anyone else is going for the same reasons we are i.e. better future for our children.

 

We're coming from the UK and I have serious doubts about the opportunities available to our kids when they are in their teens, making important decisions about their futures.

 

What are peoples opinions about career/life opportunities in Australia available to our children?

 

OK, the UK isn't in it's best shape at the minute, economically, but geographically it's positioned well to experience all of what Europe offers and indeed the States is only a 5 hour flight away. Whereas the closest country to Australia is 10+ hours ways. And to be frank I'm not sure Asia will offer the best in life for my girls.

 

And what about career opportunities. currently in the UK I'm reading for every postgraduate job opportunity their are 250 students applying for it. I also read somewhere that a large engineering firm were offering 300 apprenticeship schemes and they had 10,000+ applications. Does Australia have a similar scenario?

 

Australia, is essentially an Island in the middle of nowhere, and a huge one at that. Are my girls going to experience different lifestyles, cultures, experiences living on one island? Has Australia any culture to offer at all to rival France, Italy, Holland, Germany, dare I say…UK?

 

Is the perceived Ozzy lifestyle (laid-back, sun, sea, outdoor living, wildlife etc. etc.) enough? Are we as parents making a choice for our children today that will not allow them to experience as much of life as possible?

 

Or am I thinking too much???

 

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

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Our girls are also 3 and 5. We are planning to land in QLD at the end of 2012. Why?...

 

To instill a sense of adventure into our girls.

To lead by example in teaching them that anything is possible and that the world is full of opportunities.

To instill a love of the outdoors.

To give them an education which embraces sport and sportsmanship.

To give us, as a family, a big adventure.. a brighter future.

 

Yes, we could acheive most of the above by staying put. We love living in the Brecon Beacons. Lord knows it would be financially; emotionally and professionally easier to stay here.. but I want them to learn that leaving your 'comfort zone' and taking a (measured) risk can open up a whole world of opportunities and experiences. Take all opportunities offered to you and never ever find yourself wondering 'what if?' in your old age......

If for some reason Oz doesn't work out for us? It will have been nothing less than a brilliant adventure for our girls.

Good luck.


RGN (43) OH (47) 2 daughters (6 & 4):hug: AHPRA applied Sept. '11 & granted Jan. '12. Job offer June '12...e457 lodged 23 aug.'12..medical 28 aug.'12.. visa granted 6 Sept.'12!.. Arrived in Oz 4 Nov 2012.....!

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At the end of the day only you will know what's right for your family. Australia still churns out lawyers, Doctors, scientists so education wise it's not too bad.

 

We don't miss Europe as we didn't go that often, we married in 1993 and our honeymoon was to the Far East ... now it's the Near East and only a few hours flight from where we live ... so for us the move has brought us closer to cultures we enjoy. But if hopping over to Europe is important to you then I would say that you'll probably miss it.

 

Australia is very diverse with Each State being like it's only little country. My children now growing i've realised that what may have been good opportunities when they were 5 or 6 may not be available to them in later life. I'm a nurse and that was a life time career at one point but I know that some hospitals have re-deployed nurses and the hospital I worked at closed down it's mental health unit ... so who knows what the future holds, all we can do it give them the tools to succeed in what they choose to do.

 

It sounds as if you're not too sure about the move to Aus


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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Closet country 10+ hours away?...win the blood rugby world cup and they're still ignored :biglaugh:

 

Of course it is not as easy to get to Europe etc but new Zealand, south pacific and Asia are quite affordable these days. $398 return to Japan next month now that they've had a nuclear accident. :wink: Just about every friend/family member I have in Brisbane has travelled the world at some stage, many extensively. Sure it is harder but we all seem to do it and we usually do it properly for an extended period due to the distance. You are definitely giving up the convenience of regular European travel though. Of course like anywhere there is also a bunch of people who have been nowhere for various reasons.

 

It is your choice about the lifestyle...not all Australians are into the beach...many aren't...brisbane has plenty of theatre, opera, music and other cultural events. Far too many for a family man like me to go to more than a small percentage of them. I also prefer the outdoor family events made possible by the weather here and the number and quality of free events. All depends what city and lifestyle you are leaving behind I guess.

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I think your kids are too young to be worrying unduly about what they might be facing in their teens/twenties - if anyone has a remotely accurate estimate of what economic opportunities may be 15 years hence, then they won't be on here ;-)

 

You'll give them a taste of something different and maybe it'll work out for them and for you. Maybe it won't. The great thing with your kids being that age is that you have plenty of time to work that out. You don't even have to make serious decisions about where you want to live for schooling systems/exams for another 5 years

 

So give it a try

 

My son is a similar age (4) and we think we'll either be in Oz for 2 years (if we don't like it), 5 years (if we like it but don't love it) or indefinitely (if we love it). Either way he'll have had the chance to see something different. If we stay indefinitely he can always come back to the UK himself when he's an adult, an awful lot of Australian youngsters do after all, and yes, a lot of that is because of the geographical isolation of Australia

 

But I don't think you're closing any doors, far from it

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We generally go to the uk when traveling as given our relationship it makes a nice base for visiting the rest of Europe, working or whatever. Most are just visiting and the rest of the world is also visited these days. Everyone I know returned eventually.

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We have two girls (aged 3 and 5) and I honestly believe that it is the parents that make the children, not the country in which you live. If you are hard working, adventurous, motivated etc, it doesn't matter where you live, those qualities will pass on to your children. For us, Australia was an opportunity, and we are fortunate enough to be happy here, but we didn't move here for our children.

 

Don't over think things. If you are a good, loving, supportive parent, then your children will have a whole world of opportunity wherever you live.

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One first world country versus another - no magical 'better opportunities' conferred by one or the other. Having happy and functional parents and a nice wide social support network of friends and family is going to be the best indicator of future outcomes. Both countries are beset by much the same troubles and once kids get to an age to fly the nest they will often make their own decisions so choose whichever gives you the best opportunities for you at the moment and accept that your kids will go their own road.

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OK, the UK isn't in it's best shape at the minute, economically, but geographically it's positioned well to experience all of what Europe offers and indeed the States is only a 5 hour flight away. Whereas the closest country to Australia is 10+ hours ways. And to be frank I'm not sure Asia will offer the best in life for my girls.

 

Personally, being further away from the US is actually a plus point for me. Honestly, I have no desire to ever go there again and if and when my son is old enough, if he wants to visit, travel round it or whatever he will be more than capable to take himself I would think.

 

And there are plenty of places less than 10 hours flight from Australia. Yes mainly Asian countries but New Zealand is on the list also. I am sure you can find plenty of places to go if you wish.

 

 

Australia, is essentially an Island in the middle of nowhere, and a huge one at that. Are my girls going to experience different lifestyles, cultures, experiences living on one island? Has Australia any culture to offer at all to rival France, Italy, Holland, Germany, dare I say…UK?

 

Honestly, how many of us take our kids round Europe and show them the culture? We don't have enough holidays or money to take it all in, even though its on our doorstep. Most people for their summer holidays go to Spain, Turkey, US or someplace and do the beach thing when they have kids. Or do the whirldwind tours and don't ever really get to see or experience things properly. I don't know anyone with a 3 year old who has said 'I know, we'll go to Vienna and check out the churches and go see the Spanish Riding School perform while we're there'.

 

The idea of culture being close is lovely, but how many of us really make the most of it? Its not until kids are older we tend to do those sorts of things but again, I don't know that many kids/teens who can say they've been to Oberammergau and seen the Passion Play or gone to Rome for a weekend and seen the sights there.

 

I did a backpacking stint round Europe when I was 19 or so. Lived in a few countries also. Was how I saw most of Europe. As an adult and without parents. I did see lots when I was a kid also as I had a mother who preferred to take me to the mountains of Austria for a summer holiday than go sit on a beach. But none of my friends did what I did for holidays. Same with our annual week in London seeing all the shows, doing the museums and so on.

 

What my husband and I have decided to do when our son is old enough to appreciate it is take a 3-6 month stint and pull him out of school and go travelling round Europe. Hubby did it when he was in school and loved it. His Mum spent 3 months living in Sacandinavia and then 3 months travelling Europe with him and his brother. Was educational also :) We figure aged about 10 or so it'll be a fab experience for a few months. We can show him so much in that time and when he is older, if he wants to return he can. Our way around the culture aspect. We'll embrace the Aussie culture, plan holidays to explore NZ and a few other places and also some serious time travelling Europe (and time to save for it also). Will tie it in with an extended trip to the UK also we hope. Of course, this is all a fair few years in the future but its our plan and we hope to be able to make it happen.

 

End of the day I think its what you make it. If you move to Aus, explore it if you can, visit NZ, amazing country to travel round, take some holidays and go live a little and experience some of the culture that that part of the world has to offer :)

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Look, just get on that plane, never stop thinking about your family in England, but try and forget everything else about the place, and have a good time.

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Again who knows what the economic or climatic state of any country will be in 10-15 years time.

 

If you all have Australian and UK citizenship by then you can take your pick of a wide range of countries. No saying if your kids will stay in Australia any more than if they would have stayed in the UK.

 

Remember once they are adults they can make their own decisions on where they want to work and live.

 

However at this stage it is important that YOU want to do it.


So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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