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Sunshine111

Schools warned; Sharpen up on teaching skills...

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Could have been a newspaper headline out of one of the UK newspapers couldn't it.....? but no, this is one from the West Australian in Perth.

 

http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/newshome/10679839/schools-warned-sharpen-up-on-teaching-skills/

 

Have attached the link, was part of the reason for returning to Uk from Perth. I found the early childhood system and what was available to our son, immensely limiting and very frustrating, with a poor focus on socialisation and independence from 3 yrs old through to 5 yrs, never mind the literacy and numeracy! can't comment past that as we are back now and what a difference in the teaching.

 

I am utterly over the moon seeing him absolutely thriving in his new school back here in the UK. He is slightly behind on his phonics but they have something in place to assist him with that and helps that he only missed the reception year, so time enough to catch up with the right support, which in essence he is getting.

 

What a difference in the teaching method including socialisation things like learning to work on his own, in pairs, in a group, responsibility etc, sounds quite basic, but it just wasnt happening whilst he schooled in Perth - daycare was a hugely worrying start for the early years too, visited so many and had to pull him out of x2 and he was only going x1 day a week and one of them was for a morning when he was 3 yrs!

 

Upped him to x2 days daycare when he was 4 yrs with probably, what was the best in the area, and although we finally got good carer, he spent most days painting and surrounded by 3 yr olds, (that was mid this year) and he was 4 & 1/2 yrs. Understandably he never wanted to go, on those morning, but funnily since being back in UK have not had any resistence to school - they are learning in a fun way, they did bingo last week but I can really see the difference, he is like a sponge and lurving it. Hard to believe that if we had stayed in Perth he would still be only doing x2 days a week till next February.

 

On a positive note, at least they have recognised there is an issue and will I hope be putting things in place to rectify it, though whether it is enough, time will tell......

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Guest guest59652

Never ever knock the uk. Moving to australia has taught me how good the UK actually is. When I told people of these views whilst back in the uk they thought i was mad.

I would not have had my education anywhere else at any stage. I would also have not wanted to learn to drive anywhere else - as you need all the best training and tricky tight roads to help you survive these drivers out here - who have absolutely no manners.

 

We are all too good at knocking the uk. People in aus hardly ever knock their country. I make sure on here that we appreciate who we are, where we are from and what will always be in our blood.

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Totally agree with you, even though my children never schooled in AU my friends children did, and as a comparison to what I see here in the UK it is very different. Some of my friends in AU, their children didn't start school until they were over 6. Not sure how that worked, but I know that if your child is born up till April then you as a parent have the choice to hold your child back a year. Lots of parents do this as they don't think their child is ready to start school at 5.

 

When children are reading, writing and doing simple addition and subtraction (to name only a few of the skills learned at age 5 in the UK) friends & family in AU are amazed, but this is the norm in the UK.

 

Isnt it something like 60% of the brain develops between birth and age 6? Then another 20% from 6 - 12? Which leaves teens and adults only 20% to play with for life! I am sure this was on a TV documentary that I watched, sure stuck in my mind.

 

Saying that, there is obviously other theories on how a child learns, in Europe they don't start school till at 6-7. But for me, the younger they begin the better. Plus, keeping a child at home till 6-7 would drive me and them insane!!! haha


"If you spend your whole life waiting for the storm, you'll never enjoy the sunshine"

 

 

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Its not much better here in Sydney either I was told Australia was ahead of Ireland but its not far from it.

My youngest is in year 4 they have only started to learn attached writing and they tell my son that he's doing it wrong he's been doing it since 2nd class thats 2 years ahead of them!!

I've 2 more in high school and they are bored, the teachers are lazy have no control over there classes most of the time with kids on facebook and skype.. thats what happens when you give them laptops .

They miss the strictness ,order and homework how often do you hear kids say that. And this is a private school.

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Its not much better here in Sydney either I was told Australia was ahead of Ireland but its not far from it.

My youngest is in year 4 they have only started to learn attached writing and they tell my son that he's doing it wrong he's been doing it since 2nd class thats 2 years ahead of them!!

I've 2 more in high school and they are bored, the teachers are lazy have no control over there classes most of the time with kids on facebook and skype.. thats what happens when you give them laptops .

They miss the strictness ,order and homework how often do you hear kids say that. And this is a private school.

 

A relative of mine who was a secondary teacher in AU had no control over her class, she used to tell us stories of being blocked out of her class by chairs piled up at the door....... of how she had an argument with a pupil and when his parents came in - she also told them what she thought! Very unprofessional, but she couldn't see my point...... I guessed it was her laid back attitude.

 

As for joined up writing - thats strange teaching so late. I know in the UK cursive writing begins in year 1.


"If you spend your whole life waiting for the storm, you'll never enjoy the sunshine"

 

 

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Guest Guest 47403
Could have been a newspaper headline out of one of the UK newspapers couldn't it.....? but no, this is one from the West Australian in Perth.

 

http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/newshome/10679839/schools-warned-sharpen-up-on-teaching-skills/

 

Have attached the link, was part of the reason for returning to Uk from Perth. I found the early childhood system and what was available to our son, immensely limiting and very frustrating, with a poor focus on socialisation and independence from 3 yrs old through to 5 yrs, never mind the literacy and numeracy! can't comment past that as we are back now and what a difference in the teaching.

 

I am utterly over the moon seeing him absolutely thriving in his new school back here in the UK. He is slightly behind on his phonics but they have something in place to assist him with that and helps that he only missed the reception year, so time enough to catch up with the right support, which in essence he is getting.

 

What a difference in the teaching method including socialisation things like learning to work on his own, in pairs, in a group, responsibility etc, sounds quite basic, but it just wasnt happening whilst he schooled in Perth - daycare was a hugely worrying start for the early years too, visited so many and had to pull him out of x2 and he was only going x1 day a week and one of them was for a morning when he was 3 yrs!

 

Upped him to x2 days daycare when he was 4 yrs with probably, what was the best in the area, and although we finally got good carer, he spent most days painting and surrounded by 3 yr olds, (that was mid this year) and he was 4 & 1/2 yrs. Understandably he never wanted to go, on those morning, but funnily since being back in UK have not had any resistence to school - they are learning in a fun way, they did bingo last week but I can really see the difference, he is like a sponge and lurving it. Hard to believe that if we had stayed in Perth he would still be only doing x2 days a week till next February.

 

On a positive note, at least they have recognised there is an issue and will I hope be putting things in place to rectify it, though whether it is enough, time will tell......

 

Oh yes nothing better than a bit of Oz bashing when you've failed to make things work out for you in Australia love it :wub:

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Guest Guest16631

............schools and teachers are as individual as the children relying on them...............................regardless of the UK or OZ......................and yes the young child is like a sponge for information ...........................so you as a parent are responsible on providing stimulating enviroments...................if your little one needs that bit more confidence or tuition.................either move to a school or class that suits their needs ................extra tutoring...............or even turn the tv off and interact with your child.....!!!!

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Guest guest59652
Oh yes nothing better than a bit of Oz bashing when you've failed to make things work out for you in Australia love it :wub:

 

Baz - I do not think its a case of oz bashing - its a case of being proud of ones sense and spirits. These comments have been made are wholly true from those involved.

:daydreaming:

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............schools and teachers are as individual as the children relying on them...............................regardless of the UK or OZ......................and yes the young child is like a sponge for information ...........................so you as a parent are responsible on providing stimulating enviroments...................if your little one needs that bit more confidence or tuition.................either move to a school or class that suits their needs ................extra tutoring...............or even turn the tv off and interact with your child.....!!!!

 

In the UK there are nurserys and play groups available for children as young as 3 that offer 5 half days a week moving to full-time pretty quickly. This is by far a better enviroment for these young people to learn different skills, not just educational but also social. These groups offer a much better alternative than what any parent can do on their own at home. It has nothing to do with turning the TV off, Its about young children learning skills and theres no better place for this than amongst their peers. The balance comes in the early mornings, evenings and weekends when they then also get time to spend with both parents and their siblings.

 

Having gone through a very similar situation in Oz, there is no doubt what system we prefered, so we did move schools, back to the UK.

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Guest Guest16631

.................havving 3 of my own and involved in many other children............................from pre school to uni......................in the UK ,Europe and OZ...................THE PARENTS AND HOME INVIROMENT HAS THE BIGGEST IMPACT ON A CHILD..........playgroups and interactive enviroments do not have to be state run......................a group of like minded mums can achieve as much as any playgroup................useing parks, libary or local halls and private homes................I'm not saying any country is better than the other .........................just that the childs growth socially and educationally are ultimatley the parents responsibility !

“Man must cease attributing his problems to his environment, and learn again to exercise his will – his personal responsibility.”

Albert Einstein.............

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I attended a education conference recently and a leading researcher in education talked about a declining performance in Australian schools - where Australia currently ranks well internationally he stated that this is sliding and particularly so for high ability students.

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we have been back just over a year - one son at uni - thriving - combining a fantastic education with a great social life and independence. My eldest completed his degree in Oz (worked his butt off to get a first and was very much a big fish in small pond) and is now studying medicine at Imperial College - loving being among equally capable people and being a little fish again. Absolutely loving uni life, London life and independence. My 16 year old has had her ups and downs in returning - teased for sounding ozzie, friendship ups and downs but the teachers at her comp are absolutely amazing have brought her through this to know she can achieve her gcses and go onto to A levels ( in Oz she was graded as D and told she could work in a shop). She is focssed and beleive sin herself - I am excited for her.

 

I think the difference here is that teachers realise they need to guide and shape learning - and help young people through their personal development as well as academic to achieve their best.

 

We miss Oz in many ways mainly the sunshine and beaches - but our kids are flourishing here and we believe finishing their education in Uk will set them up for life.

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Never ever knock the uk. Moving to australia has taught me how good the UK actually is.

 

We are all too good at knocking the uk. People in aus hardly ever knock their country. I make sure on here that we appreciate who we are, where we are from and what will always be in our blood.

 

Agree completely. You never hear an Aussie knocking their country, its a shame some of that national pride doesnt rub off on us Brits (English are the worst!) However, it has taken me being away for 10 yrs to fully appreciate what the Uk has to offer. Being in NZ and Oz was a fantastic adventure, but I am sooo glad to be home.

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we have been back just over a year - one son at uni - thriving - combining a fantastic education with a great social life and independence. My eldest completed his degree in Oz (worked his butt off to get a first and was very much a big fish in small pond) and is now studying medicine at Imperial College - loving being among equally capable people and being a little fish again. Absolutely loving uni life, London life and independence. My 16 year old has had her ups and downs in returning - teased for sounding ozzie, friendship ups and downs but the teachers at her comp are absolutely amazing have brought her through this to know she can achieve her gcses and go onto to A levels ( in Oz she was graded as D and told she could work in a shop). She is focssed and beleive sin herself - I am excited for her.

 

I think the difference here is that teachers realise they need to guide and shape learning - and help young people through their personal development as well as academic to achieve their best.

 

We miss Oz in many ways mainly the sunshine and beaches - but our kids are flourishing here and we believe finishing their education in Uk will set them up for life.

 

Great post! thank you. Great to hear your kids are doing well. I myself found it such a big decision to return, wondering if it was right for our kids, better life in Oz etc... but for us, we seem to have found that better life on returning. We have had to research to find it, and if we had moved to the wrong area, I am sure it would have effected our decision but first and foremost, seeing my eldest son flourshing is utterly brilliant.

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Great post! thank you. Great to hear your kids are doing well. I myself found it such a big decision to return, wondering if it was right for our kids, better life in Oz etc... but for us, we seem to have found that better life on returning. We have had to research to find it, and if we had moved to the wrong area, I am sure it would have effected our decision but first and foremost, seeing my eldest son flourshing is utterly brilliant.

 

The same goes for picking areas in Australia too. My children were 3 and 7 when I moved here I my experience of early childhood education was not the same as yours. THere are plenty of pre-kindy places (not daycare) in Perth, you just have to look around. My youngest went to a fantastic one in Duncraig and I know of many others. Her Kindy class was exemplary and she is now a confident, smart Year 3 with excellent social skills which were started in pre Kindy class and at home with me.

 

I am glad you have now found your place in the world but I could call up many articles about the UK which make it sound very different to the one you describe. Nowhere is perfect, we just find the right place for us and our children.

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In the UK there are nurserys and play groups available for children as young as 3 that offer 5 half days a week moving to full-time pretty quickly. This is by far a better enviroment for these young people to learn different skills, not just educational but also social. These groups offer a much better alternative than what any parent can do on their own at home. It has nothing to do with turning the TV off, Its about young children learning skills and theres no better place for this than amongst their peers. The balance comes in the early mornings, evenings and weekends when they then also get time to spend with both parents and their siblings.

 

Having gone through a very similar situation in Oz, there is no doubt what system we prefered, so we did move schools, back to the UK.

 

kungfustu, you are too right. I was at home with my son until he was 3 yrs and we were with mother groups/playgroups/music groups, libraries, parks etc but when he hit around 3 onwards just did not seem enough. He just seemed to need so much more than just being with his ole' mum day in day out & probably an opportunity for some independence. Dont think that unusual, he was just ready for the next stage. We only wanted 1-3 mornings of something like a nursery in Perth, where he was with others his own age (not much younger) and in a stimulating environment. There just didnt seem to be anywhere affordable amongst other things, that could offer that for us.

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The same goes for picking areas in Australia too. My children were 3 and 7 when I moved here I my experience of early childhood education was not the same as yours. THere are plenty of pre-kindy places (not daycare) in Perth, you just have to look around. My youngest went to a fantastic one in Duncraig and I know of many others. Her Kindy class was exemplary and she is now a confident, smart Year 3 with excellent social skills which were started in pre Kindy class and at home with me.

 

I am glad you have now found your place in the world but I could call up many articles about the UK which make it sound very different to the one you describe. Nowhere is perfect, we just find the right place for us and our children.

 

I have no doubt you would dig out loads more articles about the uk, that make it sound very different - that is the easy bit,there are so many negative ones! and it makes a decision to move back to the UK all the more harder. I had some big worries about moving back, based on amongst other things, what I was reading in the papers, got the wobbles more times than a plate of jelly!

 

On moving to Australia you expect a better life. It is a huge decision so nothing less will do. Some find it, and that is great for them but some do not. It isnt a one size fits all cap. You hear more success stories like yours but what about those, that do not find what they are looking for? or decide down the track it just isnt for them?

 

For all my worries, we have moved back and have managed to find the right place for us, and in the UK. Bottom line is, it is possible. If you want it enough, you just got to look.

 

Interesting, was the pre-kindy for x1 or x2 mornings a week for 2 hrs at a time? We had something similar in our area but was v.expensive and very hard to get into. Tho' to be fair, that was just in our area.

 

Our perspections do come from our experiences and it is true to say that nowhere is perfect but we just got to find where we feel we belong, where ever that maybe. Good to hear you have found yours. Be boring if we were all the same ay?!

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We are in a very tricky situation. Our 10 year old has passed her grammar school exam for a very good school. She is bright but just managed to pass by 5 points. We won't know if she has a place until next March. Our 7 yeer old is very bright (approx 1 year ahead of his peers as he is late august born and, is in top groups for everything and would also appear to be GS material. We are having trouble finding finances and places for them both in private schools in Melbourne as most are full except one which is really expensive. Realistically therefore we would be in the state system. They are currently in a very small private school here and are worried about taking them out of that environment and into one of the local state which has 1900 pupils. We've heard so much of Oz focussing on the individual and not being hysterical about qualifications as here and we quite like that idea as exams are not everything. We do however all want to go and are worried about the prospects for them when they finally enter the workplace here and believe there to be more opportunities down there. Any thoughts much appreciated.

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Guest The Ropey HOFF

It's a shame the job situation for youngsters is so dire here in the uk, i readily accept that the uk might offer better education overall, but not by much and i for one would choose a slightly lesser standard of education in Australia for my kids with better prospects of a well paid career at the end of it, than the grim realities facing education leavers here in the uk.

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We are in a very tricky situation. Our 10 year old has passed her grammar school exam for a very good school. She is bright but just managed to pass by 5 points. We won't know if she has a place until next March. Our 7 yeer old is very bright (approx 1 year ahead of his peers as he is late august born and, is in top groups for everything and would also appear to be GS material. We are having trouble finding finances and places for them both in private schools in Melbourne as most are full except one which is really expensive. Realistically therefore we would be in the state system. They are currently in a very small private school here and are worried about taking them out of that environment and into one of the local state which has 1900 pupils. We've heard so much of Oz focussing on the individual and not being hysterical about qualifications as here and we quite like that idea as exams are not everything. We do however all want to go and are worried about the prospects for them when they finally enter the workplace here and believe there to be more opportunities down there. Any thoughts much appreciated.

 

I did a lot of work in private schools in Melbourne which can be very elitist and difficult to get into. There are also some good (and popular) state schools such as Melbourne High School (boys) - do you know anyone in the area who can advise you - with academically able kids I would advise you to seek out a school which has a clear academic focus otherwise you may end up in a 'summer heights high'. You could also consider the Catholic system which has some excellent schools in Melbourne. Good luck.

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It's a shame the job situation for youngsters is so dire here in the uk, i readily accept that the uk might offer better education overall, but not by much and i for one would choose a slightly lesser standard of education in Australia for my kids with better prospects of a well paid career at the end of it, than the grim realities facing education leavers here in the uk.

 

Yes, but the trouble is Hoff that lots of the children being discussed here are in kindy and primary - that is a long time until they will be looking for employment and nobody knows which economy will be up or down that far in the future. Securing the best education would always be my preference.

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playgroups and interactive enviroments do not have to be state run......................a group of like minded mums can achieve as much as any playgroup................useing parks, libary or local halls and private homes................I'm not saying any country is better than the other .........................just that the childs growth socially and educationally are ultimatley the parents responsibility !

“Man must cease attributing his problems to his environment, and learn again to exercise his will – his personal responsibility.”

Albert Einstein.............

 

Sadly most peoples situation in Oz as expats is that they dont have a huge circle of friends or family to fall back on to form their own play group, I dont think anyone is talking about a couple of hours once a week at a play group, that is the problem, the children need more stimulation and having a 3,4 or 5 year old at home for most of the week when a learning enviroment at a pre school or kindy/nursery full time is so much better for them and their development as they can interact with children their own age whilst getting a good base to their fledgling education.

 

I wasnt aware that educating my children was my personal responsibility, I always thought the state took care of educating their people, my choice comes if I want a particular state to educate my children or not and in this situation I chose against the Oz state education because I felt it was inferior to the one on offer at home, the proof is in the pudding and my kids are doing just grand.

 

"Man will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time he will pick himself up and continue on" winston churchill.

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I wasnt aware that educating my children was my personal responsibility,

 

A primary school only has a 5% sphere of influence on a child - the other 95% of high or low achieving is up to the parent. (This is quoted from research I've been a part of in the UK on the role of parents in education).

 

Did you not speak to your child pre-school age? Have you not taught them to use a knife and fork? Do you read with your child everyday?

 

You would (or maybe not) be surprised at the number of parents that do not. We regularly get children picked up from school, mother on the mobile phone. Mother continues to speak on phone, swearing openly infront of 5 year olds, doesn't even smile at child and walks off, leaving child to trail behind. Virtually every single day.

 

Obviously though, its all the teachers fault though that Destiny doesn't even know her own name, let alone how to read it, spell it, or write it.

 

Whilst so many parents continue to think like this, teachers are fighting a losing battle from the off.


Moved on a 179 PR visa Feb 2012; Citizenship granted Jan 2016. Settled in Adelaide. Loving it and feel like everyday is paradise compared to life in the UK.

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If school is grounding for future employment prospects and judging by some of the comments here, I'm amazed that Oz has any lawyers, doctors, engineers etc................Oh wait a minute! :idea: They must import 'em all from the UK where the education system is soooooooooo much better :wacko:


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