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Guest tonymalony

Visa options? Melbourne (ps: It's 30 degrees today!)

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Guest tonymalony

Hey Guys,

 

I hope you're all well and thanks in advance for taking the time to read this thread.

 

My problem: I'm in Melbourne at the moment on a tourist visa with the "no work" restriction. I really love it here and would love the option to work and stick around for a few years. I'm quite an honest person and would only do things in the correct manor.

 

History: In 2005 I was issued a WHV but as far as I can tell (it's been a long time) I didn't complete enough regional work to get a second WHV. Is there any exceptions made on this (probably not!)

 

My occupation: Well I'm a trained Sound Engineer to Diploma level and have been working in that business on and off for the last 15 years. I've been self employed and running a successful audio production and DJ service for the last 7 years. I have invoices and contracts for most of my previous work as proof.

 

The issue: I'm quickly running out of money and really this is that last throw of the dice for me. My budget for visa application (whichever visa is available to me) is about 2000-3000$

 

Any suggestions how I should proceed further? Which visa do you think would be most suited to me?

 

Many thanks

Tony.:huh:

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Guest tonymalony

Hi Surflen - Many thanks for your response.

Sponsorship..hmmmm - How would I go about getting this?

Do I need to be sponsored by an employer or can I sponsor myself?

 

I don't know much about all of this.

 

T.

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You'd need to find an employer who was willing to sponsor you. Check out the DIAC website (http://www.immi.gov.au) and it will spell out the requirements. The 457 is probably the fastest option but you are tied to that employer and its only a temporary visa. PR is always preferable but if you have a route to get there, a 457 might help you stay in the short term.

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Guest tonymalony

Judging from the response to my initial mailout to companies so far, this 457 request is not going down well. How can you get a company to sponsor you if you can't demonstrate the benifits you can bring to their organisation. I have offered to help out for free at about 25-30 different companies and haven't heard back from the majority them!

 

I don't think a straight up 457 (without previously being employed by a company) is going to be possible. Unless of course you have an extremely niche occupation and they simply cannot find anybody suitable.

 

Ah what to do next... ?

 

Has anybody ever received a work exception on a tourist visa? I know they do exist but from what I can see it's only if you can't leave Australia and return home for serious reasons.

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Judging from the response to my initial mailout to companies so far, this 457 request is not going down well. How can you get a company to sponsor you if you can't demonstrate the benifits you can bring to their organisation. I have offered to help out for free at about 25-30 different companies and haven't heard back from the majority them!

 

I don't think a straight up 457 (without previously being employed by a company) is going to be possible. Unless of course you have an extremely niche occupation and they simply cannot find anybody suitable.

 

Ah what to do next... ?

 

Has anybody ever received a work exception on a tourist visa? I know they do exist but from what I can see it's only if you can't leave Australia and return home for serious reasons.

 

I was overseas when I applied for the job I'm in now. I think it took around 200 email applications before I found a sponsor...it all takes a little time! If you're not set on staying where you are now, consider contacting companies in other cities and states.

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What about arranging a meeting with a migration agent to discuss your options?

 

If Sound Engineer is on the list of skills required what about looking at regional visas? South Australia has heaps of festivals so would imagine sound engineers would be in demand and you could settle in Adelaide.

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Guest TCASAlert

Your occupation does not need to be particularly niche to get sponsored, but it can take a long time. I started emailing companies again in April this year (having given up a couple of years ago). It took 31 introduction emails, countless follow ups and email discussions, and until September to finally get offered a job with sponsorship. Then I got offered 2 at the same time :-) You really do have to go all out and keep on chasing them, and if they say no email them again a few weeks later to follow up and see if there is anything else. Don't worry about pestering people, they need to know you are serious about moving. We are now waiting for the visa to be processed.

 

Don't go thinking that the 457 process is a fast one as it isn't, by the time you factor in finding a job and the sponsorship process it can easily take many months. Even when we get there we are tied to being sponsored until we can gain PR after 2 years (hopefully they don't change the rules in the meantime). You can't really buy a property or anything until you have PR, as at any time you could be going home. We are fortunate that our son is not 2 yet and we have a few years until he starts school, otherwise it would not have been an option for us.

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My problem: I'm in Melbourne at the moment on a tourist visa with the "no work" restriction. I really love it here and would love the option to work and stick around for a few years. I'm quite an honest person and would only do things in the correct manor.

 

Well, looking for work whilst on a visitor visa is already a breach of the visa conditions - hardly correct if you ask me...

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Guest TCASAlert
Well, looking for work whilst on a visitor visa is already a breach of the visa conditions - hardly correct if you ask me...

 

Depends on the visa you are on. If you're on an eVisitor from the UK it covers you for business meetings:

 

 

An eVisitor is designed for people who are outside Australia and want to visit Australia for tourism or business purposes.

 

Tourism includes holidays, recreation and seeing family and/or friends.

 

Business purposes may include attending a conference, negotiation or exploratory business visit.

 

Surely an interview would be classed as a "Business Meeting"?

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Depends on the visa you are on. If you're on an eVisitor from the UK it covers you for business meetings:

 

 

An eVisitor is designed for people who are outside Australia and want to visit Australia for tourism or business purposes.

 

Tourism includes holidays, recreation and seeing family and/or friends.

 

Business purposes may include attending a conference, negotiation or exploratory business visit.

 

Surely an interview would be classed as a "Business Meeting"?

 

Trust me, there is no visa that allows you to enter Australia without rights to work and seek employment..

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Guest TCASAlert
Trust me, there is no visa that allows you to enter Australia without rights to work and seek employment..

 

This was the route we were looking at initially before I got my job offer over here (we were going to go over an look for work over there).

 

DIAC advised us the best visa would be an eVisitor as we are not going to engage in paid employment.

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This was the route we were looking at initially before I got my job offer over here (we were going to go over an look for work over there).

 

DIAC advised us the best visa would be an eVisitor as we are not going to engage in paid employment.

 

That's why you shouldn't phone DIAC for advice - they are there to apply the law. Migration agents exist to offer advice and guidance.

 

Have you not ever seen "Border Security - Nothing to Declare"? People regularly get sent home on the next plane if the border guard feels that the person is intending to stay in Australia longer than a visit.

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That's why you shouldn't phone DIAC for advice - they are there to apply the law. Migration agents exist to offer advice and guidance.

 

 

So you're saying a migration agent knows more about DIAC procedures than DIAC themselves :biglaugh: I'd sooner speak to them directly and get the facts.

 

Have you not ever seen "Border Security - Nothing to Declare"? People regularly get sent home on the next plane if the border guard feels that the person is intending to stay in Australia longer than a visit.

 

That is indeed the case however these people are almost always from high risk countries (from where you can't get an eVisitor in any case). They almost always have no funds to support themselves, no intention of what they will do in the country, and often have letters and things from employers directing them where to go for work when they arrive.

 

Converse this with a Brit arriving for a holiday, with funds and not stockpiling CVs. After all, your intention is to visit primarily for a holiday, if you happen to have a couple of coffees with local employers then so be it.

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That's why you shouldn't phone DIAC for advice - they are there to apply the law. Migration agents exist to offer advice and guidance.

 

I also phoned diac for advise on what visa i needed to enter oz for work assessment and interview and was told the evisiter will be ok i was stopped at customs and nothing was said about me carrying four copies of my my resume


jason 40 cheryl 41 daniel 17

457 lodged 26th sept 2011, 10th oct 2011 Additional info reguested, visa granted 31st oct 2011

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I also phoned diac for advise on what visa i needed to enter oz for work assessment and interview and was told the evisiter will be ok i was stopped at customs and nothing was said about me carrying four copies of my my resume

 

Having a pre-planned interview is not the same as arriving in Australia and applying for jobs...

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So you're saying a migration agent knows more about DIAC procedures than DIAC themselves :biglaugh: I'd sooner speak to them directly and get the facts.

 

 

 

To be honest some of the operators at DIAC are your typical call centre staff, you phone up 5 time asking the same question and you will get 5 different answers. These people are reading the same online information as everyone else and giving their interpretation of it. They are just call centre staff not lawyers or legislators.

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Guest tonymalony
Well, looking for work whilst on a visitor visa is already a breach of the visa conditions - hardly correct if you ask me...

 

How is looking for sponsored work a breach?

I'm not going to "engage" in any work until a sponsorship comes through.

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From one of the Austrlian Embassy websites:

For short business trips to Australia - eVisitor or Business Short Stay Visa, subclass 456

 

Generally, persons seeking to engage in paid employment in Australia, even if the period of employment is less than three months, should apply for the Temporary Business Entry (Long Stay) visa - subclass 457 or other class of visa. This is regardless of whether the employer is a business based inside or outside Australia.

 

An eVisitor or 456 visa does not allow a business visitor to remain in Australia for a long-term assignment. If you intend to remain in Australia to work for a longer period you should obtain a Business Long Stay Visa prior to arrival. It is not possible to extend an eVisitor or 456 visa in Australia. Holders of either an eVisitor or 456 visa are not allowed to engage in a course leading to a degree, diploma, trade certificate or formal award.

 

An eVisitor allows a stay of maximum 3 months on each visit within a 12 month period from date of grant.

 

http://www.hungary.embassy.gov.au/btps/Business_vis.html

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Guest Cimbom

Just to let you know that any jobs related to the media or entertainment (or similar) industries in Australia are hugely competitive so it may be quite difficult for you to get sponsorship, even with your experience. These industries are quite small in Australia and there are far more applicants than there are positions. I do wish youi the best of luck though. Maybe try looking in smaller cities and towns as you'd probably have the best chance over there rather than Melbourne, Sydney, etc.

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From one of the Austrlian Embassy websites:http://www.hungary.embassy.gov.au/btps/Business_vis.html

 

As stated at the start of the thread, the OP hadn't come out with the intention of looking for work, its only since he arrived that he's found he would like to stay. The eVisitor was the most appropriate visa for him.

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As stated at the start of the thread, the OP hadn't come out with the intention of looking for work, its only since he arrived that he's found he would like to stay. The eVisitor was the most appropriate visa for him.

 

Regardless of his initial intent, Australia does not offer a "come and look for work" visa (except PR). Hence an eVisitor is no longer suitable.

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To be honest some of the operators at DIAC are your typical call centre staff, you phone up 5 time asking the same question and you will get 5 different answers. These people are reading the same online information as everyone else and giving their interpretation of it. They are just call centre staff not lawyers or legislators.

 

That has happened to me - I called twice and got 2 different anwers so that was the end of that...


18/11/11 - Posted Partner Visa (820 & 801) to Sydney Processing Centre 22/11/11 - Payment taken & confirmation email rec'd 23/12/11 - Medical in Sydney 30/1/12 - UK & Aussie Police Certificate forwarded to Sydney office 27/2/12 820 VISA GRANTED!!!

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My brother-in-law (Customs officer) reckons if you are seeking work/sponsorship while on a ETA/Tourist visa then you should declare is on the Incoming Passanger card.

 

side2-incoming-passenger-card.jpg

 

That way if you apply for a job or go knocking on an employers door and they phone DIAC to report you are covered, its seems they only get pissed when you declare you are geunine tourist but your intentions are not that of a genuine tourist.

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How is looking for sponsored work a breach?

I'm not going to "engage" in any work until a sponsorship comes through.

 

Technically not but there is a very fine line between seeking work and working, if an employer asked you to work for 3-6 months trial before they even offer you sponsorship what would you do? Knock it back?

 

You are already in the country, tempting enough as it could take maybe 2-3 months to sort sponsorship and if you are not working you are spending money but not making any. Plenty of people do this on the sly, I suspect members of PIO as well.

 

Some dont get caught and others do not, if immigration suspect you are working or you intend on working they can cancel your visa and deport you at anytime. They dont really need to catch you red-handed, suspicion is good enough.

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