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Guest guest59652

Making it work in a country town

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Guest guest59652

I found living in country town areas difficult in australia. I am now in the city. I spoke to an australian lady married to an englishman who knows that it can be hard to integrate. She said that as an australian she would find it a culture shock moving to a country town and that she would last 2 minutes and her english husband less.

 

I have found it easier to integrate in the city than in small country towns. If people move to country towns how did they make it work. I was in a country town in sa for about 18 months all up before heading to the city via the uk. I was working lots of hours dong over time and did not integrate as much as i should but with irregular work patterns and very long shifts it was against me.

 

If people are moving to the country areas, it would be good to have a forum to help people as i think the culture shock is even bigger in these areas. There were many warm and welcoming people and i always enjoyed seeing english people who had lived in the area for many years.

 

Is it just my opinion but is it much harder settling in country towns than cities? I guess life is what you make it wherever you are - but i take my hat off to people who have moved to country towns integrated and would always want to stay there. I did not quite manage to make it work as well as I would have liked.

 

Basically is the culture shock significantly greater moving to country rather than city? Is it ever possible to gain an impression of the sheer size and vastness of australia - i think on those long lonely country drives it serves to enhance this further? Read on some forums that many australians in the cities would ever entertain moving to the country, so be interested in some sociological takes on this question. I came out open minded when i moved to the countryside but left slightly disillusioned.

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The general exodus, especially of young people, is out of the country where there are limited prospects, into the bright lights of the cities. Some of the bigger country towns are OK - like Albury, Wagga, Bendigo, Ballarat etc but they are within cooee of the bigger cities anyway. Some of the smaller places would be soul destroying for people who need people and bustle around them but absolute heaven for folk who want to be on their own, self sufficient and small community minded. I can see why young people feel they have the need to escape from the very small pond. If OTOH they are into the family business and have country based hobbies like horses, hunting etc then they will probably be quite happy to stay.

 

We were contemplating Orbost at one point - interesting little town with two distinct groups - the loggers and the environmentalists and there is even a shop with a decent latte and a place where you can buy knitting needles but on balance I would have gone stir crazy, DH would have been perfectly happy though.

 

The vast majority of people living in Australia these days rarely venture outside the scope of the local train network and many wouldnt bother to drive more than 3 hours to get somewhere, they would fly, by preference. The country generally isnt what new migrants would be seeing as their Utopia!

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Guest guest59652

It knocked me for six thats for sure when I was there. The countryside in the uk is within access of cities and facilities in the most parts but in oz you have to drive and drive and drive in some cases. This is a major different cultural difference I found. I have met families from uk who have settled in country towns and love it but they are in a group for a sole person to make it i take my hat off, commend and applaud them. thanks for post quoll.

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I think if you are young and single they can be quite lonely, however, I love that rural feel but we are a close family if I was on my own I may think different although I've never been a city girl


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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We have moved to a country town, population 10000 approx, 100k to next town of similar size, 5hrs from coast & 9hrs to Sydney and I LOVE IT!

 

It's certainly not for everyone but I would move back to sunny Scotland before I lived in a city or at the coast.

 

OH is from this town so I had visited 3/4 times over past 10 years and was well aware of what I was moving to but can imagine it can come as quite a culture shock.

 

B

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Great, innit???

 

My village aint even got a shop.

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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I'm moving to Young, NSW (4 hours drive from Sydney) in January for my OH job...having lived in Maroubra, Sydney for 12 months it'll be a huge culture shock for me but willing to give it a go - will keep you posted!


18/11/11 - Posted Partner Visa (820 & 801) to Sydney Processing Centre 22/11/11 - Payment taken & confirmation email rec'd 23/12/11 - Medical in Sydney 30/1/12 - UK & Aussie Police Certificate forwarded to Sydney office 27/2/12 820 VISA GRANTED!!!

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The general exodus, especially of young people, is out of the country where there are limited prospects, into the bright lights of the cities. Some of the bigger country towns are OK - like Albury, Wagga, Bendigo, Ballarat etc but they are within cooee of the bigger cities anyway. Some of the smaller places would be soul destroying for people who need people and bustle around them but absolute heaven for folk who want to be on their own, self sufficient and small community minded. I can see why young people feel they have the need to escape from the very small pond. If OTOH they are into the family business and have country based hobbies like horses, hunting etc then they will probably be quite happy to stay.

 

We were contemplating Orbost at one point - interesting little town with two distinct groups - the loggers and the environmentalists and there is even a shop with a decent latte and a place where you can buy knitting needles but on balance I would have gone stir crazy, DH would have been perfectly happy though.

 

The vast majority of people living in Australia these days rarely venture outside the scope of the local train network and many wouldnt bother to drive more than 3 hours to get somewhere, they would fly, by preference. The country generally isnt what new migrants would be seeing as their Utopia!

 

My brother was doing a job at Cann River and I think he was too late to get a meal at the pub. (They do nice meals too as I've stayed there with him.) I think he said he drove to Orbost and back for a McDonalds - 74K each way, just checked.

 

Leaving aside any criticism of his culinary tastes, it's having some facilities around you that makes or breaks a place. Personally, I could not live in a village without a shop, pub, post office, doctors & dentists within a few minutes' drive.

 

I guess you could be lonely in a small town or a big city but it COULD be easier in a small place. I think if I set myself a target of, say, two weeks of going to the pub,club,cafe, newsagent, saying hello to everyone I met, I'd become a known 'face'.

 

Friendships might take a bit longer of course, but the longer you live in a place, start to join in activities, clubs, take classes, volunteer, etc., then they might develop?

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My brother was doing a job at Cann River and I think he was too late to get a meal at the pub. (They do nice meals too as I've stayed there with him.) I think he said he drove to Orbost and back for a McDonalds - 74K each way, just checked.

 

Leaving aside any criticism of his culinary tastes, it's having some facilities around you that makes or breaks a place. Personally, I could not live in a village without a shop, pub, post office, doctors & dentists within a few minutes' drive.

 

I guess you could be lonely in a small town or a big city but it COULD be easier in a small place. I think if I set myself a target of, say, two weeks of going to the pub,club,cafe, newsagent, saying hello to everyone I met, I'd become a known 'face'.

 

Friendships might take a bit longer of course, but the longer you live in a place, start to join in activities, clubs, take classes, volunteer, etc., then they might develop?

 

That's the way it goes, MR02...Either be self reliant, or have having to rely on all the peripheral aspects of life.

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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That's the way it goes, MR02...Either be self reliant, or have having to rely on all the peripheral aspects of life.

 

Cheers, Bobj.

 

If ever there was a bloke less suited to coming to OZ - in 1978 I could not even boil a kettle to make a cup of tea!

 

And still waiting for someone to show me how to 'boil the billy!'

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If ever there was a bloke less suited to coming to OZ - in 1978 I could not even boil a kettle to make a cup of tea!

 

And still waiting for someone to show me how to 'boil the billy!'

 

Mate, about the most basic bush lore, boiling the billy, then giving it a swing to settle the tea leaves.:yes:

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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Great, innit???

 

My village aint even got a shop.

 

Cheers, Bobj.

 

 

But does it have a pub?


Jo (Aussie), Jon (Pom on a 100 visa), Satch (the gorgeous viscous labrador) have now been joined by Siena Rose.

Does anyone have a spare instruction manual for a baby girl?

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But does it have a pub?

 

:no:

 

A 10 minute drive to the Bowlo...and the off licence.

 

Err, we have a school bus stop and a public phone booth.:jiggy:

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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Well you had more than where I grew up !

 

We had a caravan park 5 kms down the road, but no public phones for another 15 - next to the school bus stop :)


Jo (Aussie), Jon (Pom on a 100 visa), Satch (the gorgeous viscous labrador) have now been joined by Siena Rose.

Does anyone have a spare instruction manual for a baby girl?

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