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Banana707

Contributory Parent and Last Remaining Relative

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My parents are soon to apply for the Contributory Parent visa which I understand takes about two years and we are also hoping to bring my brother over as well on a last remaining relative visa.

My brother is 33 years old and would not qualify for a visa on his own. We don’t want to leave him on his own in England for long and are just wondering the best option.

Does anyone know how long LMR offshore visas are currently taking to process?

We understand its several years wait so were wondering what other options we have such as coming over on a 3 month tourist visa or student visa and then applying for an onshore LMR. Are they likely to impose waiver condition 8503 on either of these.

Any help would be appreciated

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My parents are soon to apply for the Contributory Parent visa which I understand takes about two years and we are also hoping to bring my brother over as well on a last remaining relative visa.

 

My brother is 33 years old and would not qualify for a visa on his own. We don’t want to leave him on his own in England for long and are just wondering the best option.

 

Does anyone know how long LMR offshore visas are currently taking to process?

 

We understand its several years wait so were wondering what other options we have such as coming over on a 3 month tourist visa or student visa and then applying for an onshore LMR. Are they likely to impose waiver condition 8503 on either of these.

 

Any help would be appreciated

 

8503 is not a waiver condition. If you play your cards correctly it is unlikely to by imposed.


Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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Hi Banana

 

Trawl through this thread - http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/migration-issues/93110-other-family-visas-cutbacks-delays.html - it has loads of info on it.

 

My parents came on the Contributary Visa a few years ago and instead of the 2 year wait, they got their visa within 5 months... I think because it is so expensive.

 

Once they can prove that they are 'normally resident' in Aus, your brother can follow. I am aware of people who have come over on the same flight as their parents and successfully applied for it.

 

I am nearly 2 years into what could now be a 10 year wait.. My only advice to your family is to try to convince your brother to apply on-shore after travelling here on a tourist visa :)

 

HTH

 

Cx

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Hi Banana

 

Trawl through this thread - http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/migration-issues/93110-other-family-visas-cutbacks-delays.html - it has loads of info on it.

 

My parents came on the Contributary Visa a few years ago and instead of the 2 year wait, they got their visa within 5 months... I think because it is so expensive.

 

Once they can prove that they are 'normally resident' in Aus, your brother can follow. I am aware of people who have come over on the same flight as their parents and successfully applied for it.

 

I am nearly 2 years into what could now be a 10 year wait.. My only advice to your family is to try to convince your brother to apply on-shore after travelling here on a tourist visa :)

 

HTH

 

Cx

 

Thanks.

 

My brother is happy to come over with my parents and apply onshore. In fact this is the ideal senario. We were just concerned about them imposing a no further stay restriction on his visa.

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Guest guest36187

DOes your brother have a girlfriend? Fiancee>? Does she have family?

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Nope.

He does not have a partner and there will be no immediate family left in England once my parents leave.

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Just a thought, but I don't think your brother be able to work if he applied for the Last Remaining Relative visa onshore and was put on a briding visa till it was granted. Or is it possible to get this waived?

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Just a thought, but I don't think your brother be able to work if he applied for the Last Remaining Relative visa onshore and was put on a briding visa till it was granted. Or is it possible to get this waived?

 

Yes, you can work whilst you are on a brigdging visa pending this one being assessed.

 

You can't get into debt or leave the country (without BVB) or change your situation to make you invalid for the LRR - but yes, you can be, and they want you to be an upstanding, tax-paying member of society here...

 

It's all good :)

 

Cx

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Yes, you can work whilst you are on a brigdging visa pending this one being assessed.

 

You can't get into debt or leave the country (without BVB) or change your situation to make you invalid for the LRR - but yes, you can be, and they want you to be an upstanding, tax-paying member of society here...

 

It's all good :)

 

Cx

 

I am a bit confused now about being able to work on this visa. We are looking at if for my son. However, on further investigation I found this in one of the booklets:

 

From Booklet 4, Page 24: Link - Booklet 4

 

"Bridging visas

If you apply for a visa in Australia, you will usually be granted a bridging visa to keep you lawful, in case your previous visa ceases before a decision is made on your application. It will also keep you lawful if your visa is refused and you seek merits review of that decision.

 

However, if you wish to travel overseas, you will need to apply for a specific bridging visa to allow you to return to Australia (unless you already have another visa which allows you to return to Australia)."

 

You would automatically be granted a BV A (No travel outside Australia, no work)

 

If you wish to leave Australia you need a BV B (still no work - as the tourist visa has no work rights)

 

If you wish to work you will need to apply for a BV C - and you will need 'compelling' reasons

 

"Permission to work

Generally, the holder of a Bridging visa A, B, C, or E with work restrictions can apply on form 1005 Application for a bridging visa for another bridging visa with unlimited permission to work. To be eligible, you need to demonstrate a ‘compelling need to work’, that is:

• you are in financial hardship; or

• you have been nominated or sponsored by an employer for a substantive visa on skills grounds, and appear to meet the requirements for the visa.

 

From : http://www.immi.gov.au/allforms/pdf/1024i.pdf

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