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The Pom Queen

Backpacking around Australia

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    We seem to have quite a few members out there who are already or about to backpack around OZ. I thought this forum would be great to put any work contacts in, let us know which hostels are any good and which to avoid. Etc


    If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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    Adelaide YHA - supposed to be good but I found it a bit run down and they were rather up themselves, and also limit the time you can stay there (I think it is 2 weeks).

     

    Shakespear Backpackers (also in Adelaide) - too many beds to a room and the cleaning was rather haphazard but not as stuck up as the YHA.

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    Adelaide YHA - supposed to be good but I found it a bit run down and they were rather up themselves, and also limit the time you can stay there (I think it is 2 weeks).

     

     

    Nooooooo don't say that - we're booked in for our first two weeks in Oz there! I've heard nothing but good things about it (searching high and low for all reviews/thoughts online) especially how clean it is :( :cry:


    Info about our journey down under here and our ongoing travels around the country in a Bushcamper (including lots of lovely photos of beautiful places) can be found here Enjoy :)

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    It is fine you are not going to a dump - it is in my book probably about a 6 out of 10 just over the minimum standard. If you get someone on the desk who is friendly you could probably stretch that to a 6.5. Bonus is that it is in the city so there is no travelling.

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