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Guest CazRoma3210

The Graduate Teacher Issue

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Guest CazRoma3210

Hello there, I am hoping someone can help me. :)

 

I am desperate to move to Australia from the UK asap- yet cannot find a route as yet.

 

I am a primary school teacher who gained qualified teacher status via the graduate teacher programme which Australia does not accept for a skilled visa. (I have just had my skills assessment turned down on this basis , as I was wrongly advised on this issue.) (I have been teaching nearly 10 years in the UK)

 

So I need another route into Australia but am not sure how to progress, as so far advice has been contradictory.

 

I have been told there is no qualification I can do in th UK to rectify this GTP issue by the Teaching boards in the UK. (I cannot complete a PGCE for example as I already have qualified teacher status in the UK.)

 

I have also been advised that no visa for Australia that will accept GTP- is this true? Some agents suggest the 457 will accept GTP whilst others say 457 will not accept GTP. I am confused-does anyone know or have any experience of this?

 

I have also been told that I can retrain as a teacher in Australia and pay international fees of $19,500 per year at an Australian University to gain Australia recognised qualified teacher status. If this is my only option I will do this, however it is a great deal of money and I need to be sure that a more permanent visa will open up for me afterwards. Some advice has suggested that the year course I have been offered to train on- for which I would only need a student visa of one year- will not then entitle me to apply for a permanent skilled visa or 457 afterwards? Some have suggested that to apply for a skilled visa after the year course would be impossible and that I must undertake at least a two year course and apply for a two year visa as only this option will then lead to a skilled or 457 visa route for me.

 

I obviously do not want to pay $19,500 (or more) for a course that will not open up a pathway to a skilled or 457 visa. I need some solid facts before undertaking training costing so much money.

 

Can anyone shed any light? I would most grateful.

 

Or perhaps suggest a visa agent that would be happy to deal with this seemingly complex issue and help find my way to the lucky country.

 

Thank you in advance for any help or suggestions that are received. Warmest regards.

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Having two teachers in the family I know that its not that easy to get jobs in nice places, only easy in the hard to live places that people do not want to go to, like outback etc.

 

Our teachers are mainly on contract from one year to the next. We are not short of teachers in Melbourne unless you teach maths and science. My daughter is a teacher and not employed in teaching due to the subjects she teaches and jobs. She could be employed if she moved to the country areas but she does not want to do that.

 

Teachers have to have four years of university here to teach.

 

Doubt whether you would get sponsorship as there are plenty of teaches who are getting visas and moving over and also the local market is supplying lots of teachers these days.

 

Make more inquiries, if you were to be student you could not work to help your living costs I think they limit the amount you can work and they have stopped the students from getting residency after degree because of the abuse of the system.

 

Others may be able to help you further but this is as I see it.

 

There are many many threads about teaching in Australia so have a read through and see what others experiences are.

 

I know in QLD you have to do the hard yards in the country areas before being able to teach in metropolitan areas.


Petals

:ssign15:taking no prisoners :wink:

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Guest CazRoma3210

Thank you for taking the time to reply- all replies and advice are appreciated.

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Guest guest59177

Well, you are in a right tight fix. As fate would have it, both pre-primary school teacher AND secondary school teacher are in the list of occupations (http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/_pdf/sol-schedule1.pdf) that lets you apply for a 175 or 176 family sponsored visa but primary school teacher ISN'T. This means EVEN IF you could get an assessment, you WOULND'T be able to apply for these visas currently. Next, the occupation IS present on the list of occupations (http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/_pdf/sol-schedule1-2.pdf) that lets you apply for the 176 state-sponsored visa. BUT, you would first need to identify a state that is willing to sponsor you.

 

Now, since you are unable to get assessment and are looking at a lengthy study course there is a possibility that by the time you become eligible for assessment the occupation may get removed from these lists. On the other hand it may also get added to the 175 list!!! So there is no risk free way to pursue a permanent residence for you. What is worse is that the rules are completely changing from July 1 2012. At that point you will be directly competing with people having 8 years experience and holding a PhD in primary school teaching (IF such a thing exists :biggrin:). And if the number of slots fills up with these 'heavyweights' your 'Expression of Interest' will be rejected!!!

 

There is just one highly probably path:

 

Do course and get assessment.

Find a sponsor for a 457 visa and gain 3 years experience.

Find a sponsor for 121 visa.

 

The reason I say highly probable is that occupations are much less likely to be removed from the employer nominated visa lists. But as you can see, there are major pot holes in this way. You will be totally at the mercy of your sponsors.

 

So at the moment your options seem rather bleak. Since it seems you have already spoken to a few agents, I will let more senior members of the forum help you out. But you should seriously look at Newzealand migration also. If you are an NZ citizen you have some other options for Australian citizenship. Remember, I am not saying you are eligible for NZ but it is something you should explore if you are REALLY eager about moving to Australia. Best of luck!!!

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Guest CazRoma3210

It is a minefield but thank you so much for taking the time to reply- this is definitely food for thought.

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If you did the conversion course in Australia, as things stand now, yes you would be eligible for a 176 visa (SA are sponsoring Primary School teachers currently), which is for all intents and purposes the same as a 175 (but is going through in about a month instead of a year currently). So as things stand this route would be a definate route to PR. However, as immigration rules change seemingly constantly imho I've always thought anything long term like training etc is not the best of plans if you would be devastated if the SOL or other rules changes, or have invested a lot of money. However the official reports they base the SOL lists on (I'm sorry I can't remember the name of them exactly) do say that teachers are an in need profession for the foreseeable future, which indicates that teaching will stay on the SOL (obviously, nothing is ever certain).

 

With regards to work - you are not limited to teaching once you have received your PR visa, so unless you are absolutely set on continuing teaching (and may well be thinking of leaving the profession for all we know - I know I am lol), this might also be helpful.

 

You are allowed to work on a student visa, only 20 hours a week, but minimum wage is higher in Australia (although rents are too), but it may be something to help with funds etc. And once you qualify you could get a positive skills assessment, do your 12 months work experience (if the course is only 1 year still though you would still have this from the UK though - if its a 2 year course you would have to either get a WHV (if eligible) or return to the UK to do your experience, then you could apply for the PR visa.

 

457 visas are tricky for teachers, as, especially Primary teachers, are not really in demand (especially in the populated areas) as one might believe and therefore they don't need to sponsor people - there are enough Aussie trained or already in the country teachers to fill most positions. From my understanding its pretty much like the Primary job situation in the UK - 200-400 teachers going for a single job.

 

NZ generally don't accept GTP either, although I have heard rumblings from a couple of places about people getting over there on one, but think there was some sort of conversion done in those as well - sorry to be a bit sketchy on that one, but its something to do more research on though (look into the TES Overseas teacher forum - there is a LOOOOOOONG NZ thread on there, and think there was something said on that a bit back).

 

Hope that all helps a bit - where there is a will there is a way :) Good luck :)


Moved on a 179 PR visa Feb 2012; Citizenship granted Jan 2016. Settled in Adelaide. Loving it and feel like everyday is paradise compared to life in the UK.

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Guest CazRoma3210

Wow- thanks ever so for your time and advice, I love this site! - Some rays of hope in here. If I retrain to teach in Australia I have been told I can retrain to be a secondary art and english literature teacher.. so maybe that will open up some more avenues for me. Sigh, yep I am determined- where there is a will there's a way but it wont be easy. Thanks again.

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If you are looking at teaching secondary school why not look at what you would need to do to get qualified as a work place trainer or educator within the VET sector that way at least you broaden your options and are not solely restricted to teaching within the school environment.

 

Else if you were to study in Oz with a view to gaining residency that way, I would pick a field of study that is regularly in demand and in which there seem to be constant shortages both in the cities and country areas. It seems to be well known that whilst there is a "shortage" of teachers, that "shortage" is mostly localised to more remote areas and that has problems if you have your own family as opportunities for them in those areas are limited.

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Guest CazRoma3210

Thank you for your reply-its all useful advice on here!

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Wow- thanks ever so for your time and advice, I love this site! - Some rays of hope in here. If I retrain to teach in Australia I have been told I can retrain to be a secondary art and english literature teacher.. so maybe that will open up some more avenues for me. Sigh, yep I am determined- where there is a will there's a way but it wont be easy. Thanks again.

What about doing a PGCE in Australia, still only a one year course, you could have a qualification in a year and get your skills assessed, I don't know if this is a possibility.


TRA passed 16/07/09 IELTS Passed overall band score 8.5, 176 visa application submitted 23/12/09, CO team 4 13/09/11. PCC's rec'd 21/10/11 Meds 25/10/2011 4 out of 5 meds finalised 04/11/11, Sophie's referred,All meds finalised 07/11/11 Visa Grant 07/11/11

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You might be able to do a Graduate Diploma which is the PGCE equivalent. 1 year full time with a practical element. Australia is very odd when it comes to teaching, if you want a permanent job you have to be prepared for a move to the nether regions but if you would be prepared to go maybe to the NT you may get in through sponsorship that way. Other than that maybe do a working holiday visa see how that pans out. Iam working with a northern irish lady at the mo, she is here on a whv and currently going for her residency. But we work in a mining town in the midde of nowhere!

 

Ironically i am looking at options the other way around, British degrees with an Oz grad. dip puts me as an OTT, so basically at more of a disadvantage than a Polish non-english speaking teacher!! It looks like I will have to retrain again to get QTS.:eek:

 

Or maybe try the agencies!!!

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Guest CazRoma3210

That's effectively what I've been verbally offered by an Oz uni for next year-its a definite possibility-just waiting to hear if my degree will be accepted in Oz. If it is then I could retrain as a secondary teacher and gain qualified teacher status in Oz. It may be the only avenue for me but fees are A$19,500 per year as an international student. If its the only way I will do it- but when you already have this qualification and are paying that much to do it all again its a big undertaking to take such a large loan and will take me years to pay off.

My concern with this 1 year route is that some people have said I would need to do a two year course if I wanted to apply for permanent residency visa afterwards- and that a one year student visa would cut off my path to a skilled visa... so much contradictory advice- hard to know which route to take. :S

 

Thanks for taking the time to write. Appreciate it. :)

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Guest CazRoma3210

That's effectively what I've been verbally offered by an Oz uni for next year-its a definite possibility-just waiting to hear if my degree will be accepted in Oz. If it is then I could retrain as a secondary teacher and gain qualified teacher status in Oz. It may be the only avenue for me but fees are A$19,500 per year as an international student. If its the only way I will do it- but when you already have this qualification and are paying that much to do it all again its a big undertaking to take such a large loan and will take me years to pay off.

My concern with this 1 year route is that some people have said I would need to do a two year course if I wanted to apply for permanent residency visa afterwards- and that a one year student visa would cut off my path to a skilled visa... so much contradictory advice- hard to know which route to take. :S

 

Thanks for taking the time to write. Appreciate it. :)

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Hi there,

 

My friend suggested I have a look at your thread and see if I can shed any light on your situation. Reading through, mine was a little different but I'll share my story anyway.

 

In 2005, my hubbie and I decided we were going to migrate to Australia. I had been teaching in the Uk for 6 years by then and had graduated from uni having completed a 3 year BA in Primary Education. I too failed my skills assessment despite my degree being purely education based and having more than enough teaching experience. I was not ready to give up on my aussie dream so I did a little research on what might be required in order for me to pass the skills assessment. I was informed that another year of study at uni - studying anything would be enough to pass the skills assessment, and as a bonus it didn't have to be a full-time year at uni.

 

I enrolled at my local uni to do a graduate diploma in education, leadership and management. This was a part time course over a year. I had already completed study that earnt me cat points towards a masters and was convinced by my tutor to finish my dissertation and graduate with an MA instead of a diploma. I did and successfully completed my skills assessment. I do know however that I had a very tight timeline to get the skills assessment completed because all the rules were in the process of changing. I did meet the deadline and in 2006 my skills assessment was successful, in 2007 we were awarded a skilled independent 136 visa. We have been living in Australia since September 2007, are eligible for citizenship and have started our aussie family.

 

I'm not sure how much of this will help you but I hope you can see from my story that where there's a will, there's a way. I didn't give up and found my way here.

 

Felicity


Felicity + Michael - We're 'Pozzies' - Happy and Lovin' it!

Melbourne since September 07

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My concern with this 1 year route is that some people have said I would need to do a two year course if I wanted to apply for permanent residency visa afterwards-

 

I think this just depends on what quals you've already got and the specific uni you go to in Aus with regards to what they have on offer - obviously not all unis offer all the courses that there are out there, so if you are flexible with regards to where you study the 1 year is far easier (whereas if you are tied to a specific place, say because a partner has a job offer in a specific state/town then you might only be able to take a 2 year course, because that uni don't offer the 1 year course.) I think you just need to make sure you directly ask (in writing) 'Will this course give me qualified teacher status in Australia' (although they may only be able to tell you with regards to that state, seeing as how it works on such a state level once inside the country and they all have different requirements with regards to what you can/can't teach it seems on specific qualifications).

 

Hope that makes sense :)


Moved on a 179 PR visa Feb 2012; Citizenship granted Jan 2016. Settled in Adelaide. Loving it and feel like everyday is paradise compared to life in the UK.

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