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More football Ireland Vs Australia International Rules

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Two tests, international rules (AFL with a round ball !) October 28th Etihad Melbourne and Metricon Stadium, Gold Coast.

 

Come on all you Irish members, come and have a lovely night out and watch a bit of BIFFO !

 

www.ticketmaster.com.au


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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Yes it's a good game Chris, as you know AFL is based on gaelic football, hence several Irish players are in the AFL. And as I said, the last time the two teams got together there was some spirited biffo, a spectacle in itself (too much testosterone I think):laugh:


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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Yes Rob, that's the BIFFO I was talking about, LOL:laugh:


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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That'd be fighting then, its ok at the game but a bit wrong Saturday night at 10:30 in the crown - go figure.

Think I'll give it a go regardless cheers for the heads up.


Ich bin nicht ein Roboter

I am a lion

Raar

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Football was first played in Melbourne, Victoria, perhaps as early as 1840 although there was probably little resemblance to the game that is played today. The origin of Australian Football has long been in dispute. One theory is that it originates from an Aboriginal game, Marngrook (Gunditjmara for game of the ball), in which a opossum or kangaroo skin was kicked around, a noted feature being the high marking. Proponents of this theory suggest this is why many Aboriginal players of today show such exceptional skill. A popular theory of recent years was that the game was borrowed from Gaelic Football although Professor Geoffrey Blainey, a noted Australian Historian and previous Professor of Australian Studies at Harvard University, disputes this, as Gaelic Football as played in Ireland is a more recent game. He purports that Australian Football developed essentially as an Australian invention although it borrowed extensively from English football games particularly from rugby.

Yes it's a good game Chris, as you know AFL is based on gaelic football, hence several Irish players are in the AFL. And as I said, the last time the two teams got together there was some spirited biffo, a spectacle in itself (too much testosterone I think):laugh:

i believe aus football predates gaelic football

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Guest Neily

Blimey! :wacko:

Do they stop the mixed martial arts at half time and have a knockabout with an actual ball? :biggrin:

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Guest lindam

have been to some on the previous internatinal series in Ireland. Good fun and a great atmosphere. It is a good game, and looking forward to it here in the Gold Coast:jiggy:

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The Sydney Swan's Irish player has just retired - he went back to Ireland for a season didn't he to win a Gaelic League title?

 

Courtesy of living in Australia I can add another football code to my list which now comprises, (real) football!, Rugby Union, Rugby League, AFL, Gridiron (one of my friend's sons played in the NSW league) and now, Gaelic football!

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Football was first played in Melbourne, Victoria, perhaps as early as 1840 although there was probably little resemblance to the game that is played today. The origin of Australian Football has long been in dispute. One theory is that it originates from an Aboriginal game, Marngrook (Gunditjmara for game of the ball), in which a opossum or kangaroo skin was kicked around, a noted feature being the high marking. Proponents of this theory suggest this is why many Aboriginal players of today show such exceptional skill. A popular theory of recent years was that the game was borrowed from Gaelic Football although Professor Geoffrey Blainey, a noted Australian Historian and previous Professor of Australian Studies at Harvard University, disputes this, as Gaelic Football as played in Ireland is a more recent game. He purports that Australian Football developed essentially as an Australian invention although it borrowed extensively from English football games particularly from rugby.

i believe aus football predates gaelic football

 

Perhaps just in the official codification of the rules?

 

Gaelic football was first codified in 1887, although it has links to older varieties of football played in Ireland and known collectively as caid. Consequently, the name caid is used by some people to refer to present day Gaelic football.

The first record of any form of football being played in Ireland comes from 1308, when John McCrocan, a spectator at a football game at Newcastle, County Dublin was charged with accidentally stabbing a player named William Bernard.<SUP id=cite_ref-9 class=reference>[10]</SUP>

The Statute of Galway of 1527 allowed the playing of "foot balle" and archery but banned "'hokie' — the hurling of a little ball with sticks or staves" as well as other sports.

By the 17th century, the situation had changed considerably. The games had grown in popularity and were widely played.<SUP style="WHITE-SPACE: nowrap" class=Template-Fact>[citation needed]</SUP> This was due to the patronage of the gentry.<SUP style="WHITE-SPACE: nowrap" class=Template-Fact>[citation needed]</SUP> Now instead of opposing the games it was the gentry and the ruling class who were serving as patrons of the games. Games were organised between landlords with each team comprising 20 or more tenants. Wagers were commonplace with purses of up to 100 guineas (Prior, 1997).

The earliest record of a recognized precursor to the modern game date from a match in County Meath in 1670, in which catching and kicking the ball was permitted.<SUP id=cite_ref-thesmartjournal1_10-0 class=reference>[11]</SUP>

However even "foot-ball" was banned<SUP style="WHITE-SPACE: nowrap" class=Template-Fact>[citation needed]</SUP> by the severe Sunday Observance Act of 1695, which imposed a fine of one shilling (a substantial amount at the time) for those caught playing sports. It proved difficult, if not impossible, for the authorities to enforce the Act and the earliest recorded inter-county match in Ireland was one between Louth and Meath, at Slane, in 1712.

A six-a-side version was played in Dublin in the early 18th century, and 100 years later there were accounts of games played between County sides (Prior, 1997).

By the early 19th century, various football games, referred to collectively as caid, were popular in Kerry, especially the Dingle Peninsula. Father W. Ferris described two forms of caid: the "field game" in which the object was to put the ball through arch-like goals, formed from the boughs of two trees, and; the epic "cross-country game" which lasted the whole of a Sunday (after mass) and was won by taking the ball across a parish boundary. "Wrestling", "holding" opposing players, and carrying the ball were all allowed.

During the 1860s and 1870s, Rugby football started to become popular in Ireland. Trinity College, Dublin was an early stronghold of Rugby, and the rules of the (English) Football Association were codified in 1863 and distributed widely. By this time, according to Gaelic football historian Jack Mahon, even in the Irish countryside, caid had begun to give way to a "rough-and-tumble game" which even allowed tripping. Association football started to take hold, especially in Ulster, in the 1880s.

Limerick was the stronghold of the native game around this time, and the Commercials Club, founded by employees of Cannock’s Drappery Store, was one of the first to impose a set of rules which was adapted by other clubs in the city. Of all the Irish pastimes the GAA set out to preserve and promote, it is fair to say that Gaelic football was in the worst shape at the time of the association’s foundation (GAA Museum, 2001).<SUP id=cite_ref-thesmartjournal1_10-1 class=reference>[11]</SUP>

Irish forms of football were not formally arranged into an organised playing code by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) until 1887. The GAA sought to promote traditional Irish sports, such as hurling and to reject "foreign" (particularly English) imports. The first Gaelic football rules, showing the influence of hurling and a desire to differentiate from association football — for example in their lack of an offside rule — were drawn up by Maurice Davin and published in the United Ireland magazine on February 7, 1887. The rules of the aforementioned Commercials Club became the basis for these official (Gaelic Football) rules who, unsurprisingly, won the inaugural All-Ireland Senior Football Final (representing County Limerick)<SUP id=cite_ref-11 class=reference>[12]</SUP>

On Bloody Sunday in 1920, during the Anglo-Irish War, a football match at Croke Park was attacked by British forces. 14 people were killed and 65 were injured. Among the dead was Tipperary footballer Michael Hogan, for whom the Hogan Stand at Croke Park (completed in 1924) was named.

Ladies' Gaelic football has become increasingly popular with women since the 1970s<SUP style="WHITE-SPACE: nowrap" class=Template-Fact>[citation needed]</SUP>.

The relationship between Gaelic football and Australian rules football and the question of whether they have shared origins is a matter of historical controversy. Games are held between an Irish representative team and an Australian team, under compromise rules known as International rules football.

The current President of the GAA is Christy Cooney of Youghal, County Cork

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If you are not going and in Melbourne, go to the Celtic Club and watch it on the big screen - a few interesting characters in there on the night to be sure, to be sure:laugh:Someone mentioned they toned it down, I remember they were talking about calling it off at one stage:policeman:Hopefully these games will be good to watch.


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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