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Guest sh7t man no way

how long do you give Australia

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Guest sh7t man no way

before you decided to return home--is it the 2 year plan--or do you know after 1 week,or 10 years--also when do the alarm bells kick in that says its not for you,and what are the alarm bells that get you thinking like that--just how long did you give australia,and for people thinking of returning home whats making you have those thoughts

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Guest guest37336
before you decided to return home--is it the 2 year plan--or do you know after 1 week,or 10 years--also when do the alarm bells kick in that says its not for you,and what are the alarm bells that get you thinking like that--just how long did you give australia,and for people thinking of returning home whats making you have those thoughts

 

Generally mate I go by the 'Two Year Rule'. I realise that this amount of time isn't required by some, and indeed at times it can take longer, but I generally found two years about right for me.

 

Having said that if I/we didn't particular like an area we would move without hesitation, even if it meant shipping states.

 

It such a vast place that a lifetime isn't enough to see it all. And I also realise that some will inevitably come home no matter where they are as their problems seem insurmountable no matter where they live, and fair play to that.

 

Cheers Tony.:wink:

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Here you go, Alan...

 

Australia's vital statistics

 

The continent is 3 700 km from North to South and 4 000km from East to West. This varies, as the coastline takes a lot of bends and curves.

Further information:

 

From the most eastern point of Australia, Cape Byron in New South Wales, to the most western point of Australia, Steep Point in Western Australia, is a distance of 4100 kilometres.

From the most northerly point in Australia, the tip of Cape York in Queensland, to the southernmost point of the Australian mainland, Wilson's Promontory in Victoria, is 3180 km. This does not include the state of Tasmania, a large island off the southern coast of Australia.

 

Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_length_and_width_of_Australia#ixzz1X6oG9z5B

 

Cheers, Bobj.

 

Oh, before I decided to return home???

 

Still thinking about it

 

 

 

 

 

But not thinking too hard:laugh:

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Guest sh7t man no way
Here you go, Alan...

 

Australia's vital statistics

 

The continent is 3 700 km from North to South and 4 000km from East to West. This varies, as the coastline takes a lot of bends and curves.

Further information:

 

From the most eastern point of Australia, Cape Byron in New South Wales, to the most western point of Australia, Steep Point in Western Australia, is a distance of 4100 kilometres.

From the most northerly point in Australia, the tip of Cape York in Queensland, to the southernmost point of the Australian mainland, Wilson's Promontory in Victoria, is 3180 km. This does not include the state of Tasmania, a large island off the southern coast of Australia.

 

Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_length_and_width_of_Australia#ixzz1X6oG9z5B

 

Cheers, Bobj.

 

Oh, before I decided to return home???

 

Still thinking about it

 

 

 

 

 

But not thinking too hard:laugh:

no wunder that fuels so cheap--gee thats a long drive for just a few towns:biglaugh::wink:

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I have given Oz 4 years. However, I knew when I got off the plane that I didn't want to be there and I cried for weeks, my poor husband was thinking wtf. Had it not been for hubby's family being closer we would have moved areas in Oz and I suspect I would have enjoyed it more...but....I don't like being away from my family and friends and essentially nothing will ever change that. There have been times when it has gotten better for me and I've thought I can stay and times when it has been terrible. No matter how nice the weather is or how big my house is or how much I earn I will still be lonely....in that sense.

 

I think the general rule is two years but I do think most people will knwo staright away.

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Guest ShellBee

I have felt the urge to go back to the UK for sometime but have waited for that 2 yr mark to make up my mind. Moving back Sept 12 and can't wait! The alarm bells for me?... being homesick for weeks on end.

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I have felt the urge to go back to the UK for sometime but have waited for that 2 yr mark to make up my mind. Moving back Sept 12 and can't wait! The alarm bells for me?... being homesick for weeks on end.

 

yay good for you!!!! good luck:biggrin:

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I have this theory that for some, but not all migrants, at the same time as they are fighting their homesickness, Australia is imperceptibly 'growing' upon them. Unfortunately, it is only when they get back to England that they realize it.

 

I remember, decades ago, reading about this British family who emigrated to NZ and immediately HATED it. They then started saving their money to purchase their tickets home and by the time they were ready to go, they realized that they liked it in NZ. They had got used to things like the native wild and plantlife and had (re) planted roots in NZ. They wrote a book about their experiences.

 

So, even if you know, from the second you step off that plane, that you HATE Australia, I think it can grow on you. The same thing happens to some Aussies who go to UK for a holiday and end up staying for good.

 

Perhaps it's like a kind of 'reverse' marriage where the honeymoon comes at the end not the beginning?

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This is all assuming that people who move to Australia have the intention of staying there permanently.

 

Personally I think it's a big wide world out there, with lots to see and experience. Who knows what their circumstances will be in five years time. Where and how to live isn't a decision that you should make once and stick to religiously, it's far too easy to coast along in life and end up in a situation that really suited you well five years ago, but actually if you think about it, your feelings and circumstances have changed and you'd actually like something different now.

 

At the moment, being in australia is good. I have no idea where I'm going to be in five or ten years time, it might be australia, it might be the UK, it might be somewhere new.

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I think you become desensitized after a while. I knew right from the first that although I liked the place and quite enjoyed being here, it was just an adventure but it wasnt where I wanted to end my days. As long as I had that tantalizing prospect that I could move on to where I knew I belonged, it wasnt too bad - I was desensitized to it - but once the iron bars clanged down then living here became awful. In hindsight I should probably have thought more about the move after the first 4 years because that was a major decision point in our lives - if you had told me then what would be happening now, I would have fled faster than greased lightning.

 

If you cant see yourself growing old in Australia then escape while you can otherwise your options will be cut off. 2 years, 4 years, 10 years who knows - just when you get to a major decision point (job change, kids schooling, financial benefit etc)

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Guest Guest16631

...............I don't think time limits are a good idea......................people and circumstances change continually.......................sometimes a return to where you have left is no longer is an option...................would you then become discontented ??....................often by going with the flow of life................making wellthought reactions to circumstances of that time.....................will in the end outcome help dictate ........where you are livving..................

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Guest gypsy6

"If you cant see yourself growing old in Australia then escape while you can otherwise your options will be cut off. 2 years, 4 years, 10 years who knows - just when you get to a major decision point (job change, kids schooling, financial benefit etc)"

 

 

I totally agree with the above. We knew within six months of being here that it was not for us and have given it a shot for 3yrs. Now it time to go back before kids put roots down. Couldn't imagine us old here.

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Guest Guest 47403
I have felt the urge to go back to the UK for sometime but have waited for that 2 yr mark to make up my mind. Moving back Sept 12 and can't wait! The alarm bells for me?... being homesick for weeks on end.

 

Sounds like you have done it about right ShellBee I think everyone needs to give it around 2 yrs I find it funny when people move back almost immediately without giving it a chance.

 

It should also work in reverse though and those that move back to the UK should give it a couple of years before pingponging.

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I think three weeks is the PiO record for a family to return back to the UK.

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Guest Shelduck

i think you will find it is different for everyone. there is the 2 year thing, but as some have already said, some people know sooner. In our circumstance- we came to Oz with the view of it being a permanent move and thats the way it has stayed for nearly 4 years, until we some recent deaths and births in the family in uk. But even then at the time we were still "nope we still want to be in oz" but as time has gone on (past 6months-year) the wanting to return to be near family has got stronger. Cant ignore it anymore so will return next year probably. Sorry to waffle on but to sum up in some circumstances the wanting to return can just hit even after a good few years.

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i think you will find it is different for everyone. there is the 2 year thing, but as some have already said, some people know sooner. In our circumstance- we came to Oz with the view of it being a permanent move and thats the way it has stayed for nearly 4 years, until we some recent deaths and births in the family in uk. But even then at the time we were still "nope we still want to be in oz" but as time has gone on (past 6months-year) the wanting to return to be near family has got stronger. Cant ignore it anymore so will return next year probably. Sorry to waffle on but to sum up in some circumstances the wanting to return can just hit even after a good few years.

 

Us too, it will be all or nothing, it will be a permanent move whatever happens. We are not uprooting the kids twice !:no:


Justin TRA 8/4/11 success 10/5/11, WA SS sent 10/5/11 - approved 16/5/11, 176 lodged 1/6/11, CO 26/6/11, Meds 16/8/11, Finalised 26/8/11, PCC 16/9/11, VISA GRANTED 1/11/11 Arrived in Perth 12/11/2012:ssign19:

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I think the "2 year rule" was actually a pretty good guideline a few years back when the pound was strong, most Brits came over with a bit of cash in their pocket from property sales & job security over here was much better.

 

A lot has changed in the last 18/24 months for new migrants, and although I think making hasty decisions and returning after a couple of moments is still not giving it enough time, 2 years is a long time if you are for example struggling to find work, still have debts in the UK, have a house in UK that is not sold, so no equity availalble to buy a house and on top of that you dont feel settled or are having trouble meeting people.

 

Good luck to anybody that is just about to make the move, and hats off to all that have tried, but have unfortunately returned. :hug:


 

 

:wink:

 

 

 

 

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Guest Guest 47403
I think the "2 year rule" was actually a pretty good guideline a few years back when the pound was strong, most Brits came over with a bit of cash in their pocket from property sales & job security over here was much better.

 

A lot has changed in the last 18/24 months for new migrants, and although I think making hasty decisions and returning after a couple of moments is still not giving it enough time, 2 years is a long time if you are for example struggling to find work, still have debts in the UK, have a house in UK that is not sold, so no equity availalble to buy a house and on top of that you dont feel settled or are having trouble meeting people.

 

Good luck to anybody that is just about to make the move, and hats off to all that have tried, but have unfortunately returned. :hug:

 

Yeah there will always be certain circumstances where someone may HAVE to come back, main one being financial if they can't find work, or like I think it was Dawny found her kids were so unhappy.

 

But generally you have to give things a chance especially when (most people) have wanted it, planned it, researched it etc for so long. If your moving with an Aussie partner I suppose things are a bit different and it's not always what you deep down want to do.

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Yeah there will always be certain circumstances where someone may HAVE to come back, main one being financial if they can't find work, or like I think it was Dawny found her kids were so unhappy.

 

But generally you have to give things a chance especially when (most people) have wanted it, planned it, researched it etc for so long. If your moving with an Aussie partner I suppose things are a bit different and it's not always what you deep down want to do.

 

I definitely agree that you need to give things a chance, especially after all the planning, waiting, stress & cost involved in making the move in the first place. Its just that in the past new migrants (myself included) had at least a financial buffer and better work possibilities at the time to make it a less stressful move.


 

 

:wink:

 

 

 

 

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before you decided to return home--is it the 2 year plan--or do you know after 1 week,or 10 years--also when do the alarm bells kick in that says its not for you,and what are the alarm bells that get you thinking like that--just how long did you give australia,and for people thinking of returning home whats making you have those thoughts

 

 

How longs a chinaman al?????depends on work,finances,savings,how she copes being away,i'l be ok,she SAYS she will be as well,but i'l wait and see,im not setting dates/targets but would like to think we'l give it a year at least:wubclub:


"The problem with neo conservative capitalism and it's insatiable greed for more wealth and disparity amongst the populace,is that it ended up being the catalyst for the great depression and modern recession"

 

Me,tonight:wubclub:

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We'll be giving it at least 2 years.... if we come home before then I'll have to pay back the relocation package!

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I wonder which country is the best one to grow old in? Which one will take less of your capital to pay for nursing homes for instance?

 

Which Govt is more likely to take care of you?

 

Two 'first world' economies with all the benefits of modern states. Does it really matter which one you live in?

 

I can't answer the first two questions, don't have an opinion even. As for the third, well, probably not either except that as far as Pommie migrants go, the majority stay in Australia!

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Guest sh7t man no way
I wonder which country is the best one to grow old in? Which one will take less of your capital to pay for nursing homes for instance?

 

Which Govt is more likely to take care of you?

 

Two 'first world' economies with all the benefits of modern states. Does it really matter which one you live in?

 

I can't answer the first two questions, don't have an opinion even. As for the third, well, probably not either except that as far as Pommie migrants go, the majority stay in Australia!

fair point about growing old in Australia mate--i wonder how many people take that question into account when immigrating to Australia--its happens to us all (getting old)

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Guest Julz

I personally think the 2 year rule thing is a load of rubbish. We have lived in Australia 23 months now and I knew from the 8 week mark that this was not the place for us. I think when the homesickness kicks in you make a decision there and then in your own mind where you really want to be.

 

I also believe where you live has a lot to do with your decisions too, we lived in Darwin for 20 months, hated the place and recently moved to Brisbane which we love. I sometimes wonder if we moved to Brisbane first would I still have had the massive pangs of homesickness that I had in Darwin.....I say this because Darwin is very tropical, nothing like home and Brisbane especially on the wet drizzly days feels very much like the UK.

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fair point about growing old in Australia mate--i wonder how many people take that question into account when immigrating to Australia--its happens to us all (getting old)

 

The nursing home fees for my father back in 2005 were 640 pounds a week although I'm sure that it would not have been free here for him either.

 

I'm not sure if I like the idea of giving Australia a set number of years to see if it's right - sounds a bit like a pre-nuptial agreement.

 

Then again, nearly half of all marriages end in divorce but Australia's migrant 'divorce rate' is nowhere near that bad.

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