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The 'Australian History' Thread.

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Guest guest37336

Nicked this one of sh7tman, sorry mate, couldn't wait any longer.:wubclub:

 

Australian (White) history is viewed by some rather skeptically, short in comparison to many other countries of the world, but it is indeed unique and extremely interesting, so I thought I would start thread and see where it goes.

 

I'm only going to comment on where I have been and what I know about, but would very much appreciate any further posts as I am like a sponge with this sort of stuff and love learning a bit more about my adopted country,:notworthy:.

 

Cook in South Australia still fascinates me, though little of the original town or indeed inhabitants still remain it wreaks 'Australia' to me. I have been there twice now, both times as a stop off whilst on the Indian Pacific.

 

As I said, little there now, but you (I) anyway can truly appreciate (nearly) what the earlyish settlers went thorough, not a lot to look at I admit, but truly a place where my imagination went wild and we were lucky enough to have a well informed fella tell me all about it when we stopped off,:notworthy:.

 

 

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cook,_South_Australia

 

 

 

 

cook-south-australia.jpg

 

Indian_Pacific_in_Cook,_South_Australia.jpg

 

Cook-SouthAustralia.jpg

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Guest guest37336

Though a bit tenuous, it still relates to Australian history, the story behind this particular sight is fascinating and makes for interesting reading.

 

When I was travelling around I slept in an old outhouse/storage unit for several weeks just outside the site and had a ball with two Blue tongued skinks that wanted to share the same accommodation,:realmad::yes:

 

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OTC_Satellite_Earth_Station_Carnarvon

 

 

 

 

2.1219697159.otc-satellite-dish.jpg

 

OTC_earth_station.jpg

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Guest Guest16631

...................I try to visit somewhere at least once a month.......................a country town or a coastal town..................not usually too far....................though once did a road trip from brisbane to sydney and one to bendigo...........:eek:..........at the weekend will be going to Maryborough.......it has a 150 year history as a prosperous town springing out of cane and timber industry beginnings:smile:.......it was settled in 1847...................................... and is one of Queensland's oldest provincial cities.................:jiggy:.................... Located three hours from Brisbane, Maryborough was a major immigration port into Australia....................:wideeyed:.....................widely recognised for the abundant examples of colonial and Queenslander architecture................:yes:...............I would have loved to have lived in one of these old homes...............:daydreaming:..................but the upkeep and or renovation is not for the faint hearted...................:frown:...........so that ruled OH out !!.................:wink:...............will take some photo's of the sights and put them on here...............:smile:..............have many photo's of towns around australia...............:wideeyed:.........stored all over the internet !!.......................:eek:

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Guest guest37336
...................I try to visit somewhere at least once a month.......................a country town or a coastal town..................not usually too far....................though once did a road trip from brisbane to sydney and one to bendigo...........:eek:..........at the weekend will be going to Maryborough.......it has a 150 year history as a prosperous town springing out of cane and timber industry beginnings:smile:.......it was settled in 1847...................................... and is one of Queensland's oldest provincial cities.................:jiggy:.................... Located three hours from Brisbane, Maryborough was a major immigration port into Australia....................:wideeyed:.....................widely recognised for the abundant examples of colonial and Queenslander architecture................:yes:...............I would have loved to have lived in one of these old homes...............:daydreaming:..................but the upkeep and or renovation is not for the faint hearted...................:frown:...........so that ruled OH out !!.................:wink:...............will take some photo's of the sights and put them on here...............:smile:..............have many photo's of towns around australia...............:wideeyed:.........stored all over the internet !!.......................:eek:

 

Please stick up the photos Tink, would love to see them,:yes:.

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Hey Lemming, if you are interested in the history of small towns and some of the bigger ones in Australia, you can visit the local cemeteries, often they tell the stories of the early settlers on the headstones - a great indicator of history in a wider sense.

Love the signs in the pic you posted - especially the one that says no food and petrol for 860km (Kalgoorlie) - as an Aussie I would say "ah, just down the road then":laugh:


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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Guest Guest16631

........................I will go friday night and spend the day on saturday doing photo's...................only 3 hours away....................will travel around the area a bit too......................:jiggy:

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Guest guest37336
Hey Lemming, if you are interested in the history of small towns and some of the bigger ones in Australia, you can visit the local cemeteries, often they tell the stories of the early settlers on the headstones - a great indicator of history in a wider sense.

Love the signs in the pic you posted - especially the one that says no food and petrol for 860km (Kalgoorlie) - as an Aussie I would say "ah, just down the road then":laugh:

 

Hi Olly.

 

Spent ages wandering around Broomes Japanese cemetery when there, it was gob smacking how many Japanese lost their lives through Pearl Diving, and some so young as well.:no:

 

Cheers Tony.

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yes amazing, Australia has plenty of history you just have to go and look for it. My friend is an archaeologist and he has a house full of sticks and stones......er, I beg my pardon...aboriginal utensils found around the bush in Melbourne......they are everywhere he tells me as he lights up when I ask him "What the feck is this?" LOL


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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It's a kind of history post, seeing how things have changed over recent years.

 

Second only to Cairns and Exmouth this is the one place that I truly love.

 

First went to Coral Bay thirty two years ago, fishing, there's a surprise, :idea: It was something like this, minus most of the cars and people:

 

Coral_Bay,_Western_Australia.jpg

 

Went back three years ago and now this, I'm all for progress, but,:cry::cry::cry:

 

balcony%20view.jpg

 

And several backpackers, a 'nightclub', :mad: and a beach you couldn't even swoff a fly at.:no:

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As I showed you privately, Lemon, a few items I have come across in my wanderings around this magic land:

 

A woomera and digging stick I found in the desert east of Mt. Tom Price, WA

 

942011Nativeartifacts006.jpg

 

A close up of the pattern on the woomera

942011Nativeartifacts005.jpg

 

 

A few glass spearheads from the East Kimberley, Old Lamboo Station, just south of Hall's Creek.

 

942011Nativeartifacts.jpg

 

One of my hobbies is fossicking and that involves stickybeaking around the old (1880s) mines. The number of items the miners left behind when the ore bodies petered out, is amazing...if one really looks; old bottles, round cigarette tins, metal match boxes etc.

 

Another...Get a copy of "We Of The Never Never" by Mrs Aeneas (Jeannie) Gunn. It tells of her short stay in the NT at The Elsey Station, south of The Katherine, at the turn of the 20th century

 

The Maluka, Aeneas Gunn...(pronounced MA-luh-Kuh) who died of blackwater fever.

 

Picture524.jpg

 

T those who have read the book, The head stockman lies buried on the side of the old road from Kununurra to Wyndham, just past Ivanhoe Station, about 4km west of Ivanhoe Crossing.

 

The fizzer died after helping a pregnant woman across the flooding Wickham River, NT. as he tried to get back to the other side.

 

For what it's worth.

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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Nice one Bob.:yes: As you know, I can't get enough of all this stuff.:yes:

 

Never been lucky enough to find any of the above, but do have several bits that are truly unique and of massive sentimental value.

 

Cheers Tony.

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Olly recommended a John Laws book "There is always more to the story" - I am half way through it and have learnt a great deal about many of the famous Aussie people whose names I have heard but not really known about. It is also helping me piece together Australian history - well the last couple of hundred years...


Best Newcomer 2013-14.

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Guest Guest16631

..............some interesting history..........

Remains found at a former Melbourne prison have been confirmed as those of notorious bushranger Ned Kelly.

A DNA sample taken from Melbourne school teacher Leigh Olver, Ned's sister Ellen's great grandson, confirmed the bones were those of the famous outlaw.

Doctors and scientists at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine (VIFM) identified the body.

Kelly's remains have long been rumoured to be at Melbourne's Pentridge Prison, which operated between 1850 and 1997.

The project involved collaboration with the ancient DNA laboratory EAAF in Argentina, which has worked with the VIFM on other forensic projects.

The investigation started when a skull believed to belong to Kelly was handed to the VIFM on November 11, 2009.

The skull had been taken from the Old Melbourne Gaol in December 1978 where it had been on display next to the death mask of the bushranger.

While the skull was being investigated, the team tried to identify Kelly from among the remains exhumed from Pentridge in 2009.

Through CT scans, X-rays, pathology, odontology (teeth examination), anthropological analysis and DNA, the team confirmed the skeleton belonged to Kelly.

Kelly's family will be consulted on the appropriate resting place for his remains.

Victoria's Attorney-General Robert Clark said he was amazed by the work of the forensic team.

"This is an extraordinary achievement by our forensic team here in Victoria," he said.

"To think a group of scientists could identify the body of a man who was executed more than 130 years ago, moved and buried in a haphazard fashion among 33 other prisoners, most of whom are not identified, is amazing."

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I lovee this thread, thanks so much to all who have posted with such fascinating info and pics.


And the end of all our exploring will be to arrive at where we started, and know the place for the first time.

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One of the things I miss about the UK is history, old buildings, archeology etc. Love watching Time Team on the history channel!

While Australia can't compete with the UK's rich history, there's still many places of historical interest.

 

Some places I've visited below.

 

Military history

 

Fort Nepean on the entrace to Port Phillip bay in Victoria. It was part of a network of fortifications, commanded from Fort Queenscliff, protecting the narrow entrance to Port Phillip, Victoria.

Originally a quarantine station in the 1850's it was fortifed in the 1870's and remained in use throught the first and second world wars.

 

Alice Springs - Darwin

WW2 history all along the stuart highway with numerous airstrips, hangers, army staging camps etc. In Darwin itself, there's various sites including the East point fortifications.

 

mil1.jpg

 

Queensland - Also visited the underground hospital at Mt Isa in Queensland and sites of WWII army traing camps in FNQ.

 

mil2.jpg

 

 

Geological history

 

The Volcanic lava tubes at Undara which are around 190,000 years old. One of the lava flows from Undara extends over 160 kilometres, making it one of the longest lava flows from a single volcano in the world.

 

geo2.jpg

 

Chillagoe limestone caves, formation began from coral reefs approximately 400 million years ago.

 

geo1.jpg

 

geo3.jpg

 

geo4.jpg

 

Industrial / mining history

 

Sites around the Victorian Goldfieds Ballarat, Bendigo, Castlemaine etc, Smeletrs at Chillagoe in FNQ. etc

 

min1.jpg

 

min2.jpg

 

min3.jpg

 

 

Cooktown

Probably my favourite place in Australia, can't explain it, just feel completely de-stressed when I'm there. Cooktown is a small town located at the mouth of the Endeavour River, on Cape York Peninsula in Far North Queensland where James Cook beached his ship, the Endeavour, for repairs in 1770.

 

cook1.jpg

 

cook2.jpg

 

cook3.jpg

 

cook4.jpg

 

cook5.jpg

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Wow, I'm loving this more and more :)


Jo (Aussie), Jon (Pom on a 100 visa), Satch (the gorgeous viscous labrador) have now been joined by Siena Rose.

Does anyone have a spare instruction manual for a baby girl?

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Few more photos with a historical slant.

 

Sovereign Hill - an open air museum in Ballarat, Victoria. Sovereign Hill depicts Ballarat's first ten years after the discovery of gold there in 1851. It's located on the site of one of Ballarat's major gold diggings. The discovery on August 21, 1851 by James Dunlop and James Reagan that sparked the Ballarat Gold Rush.

 

his-13.jpg

 

his-15.jpg

 

his-12.jpg

 

Central Deborah Goldmine, Bendigo

 

his-7.jpg

 

Port of Echuca - authentic working steam port, home to Australia’s largest fleet of steam-driven paddlesteamers. Operates much the same as it did in the 1860's with large parts of the original wharf still standing.

 

his-2.jpg

 

his-3.jpg

 

his-1.jpg

 

 

Stunning authentic Australian Castle :laugh:

 

his-4.jpg

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Some of the world's oldest paintings are from the Kimberlies in WA.

 

The local Aborigines have no idea who painted them and predate their owm, ancient cave paintings. They are termed "Bradshaws" after the bloke who showed them to the world.

 

http://www.convictcreations.com/aborigines/bradshaws.htm

 

A little story, nowt to do with paintings, but death...

 

In the 1960's I lived in Kununurra and early one saterday morning, went to Hidden Valley, about 2 km from the town. It is a miniature Bungle Bungles with small gorges and chasms. I found a little known area and was looking at the ancient rock marks where bygone Aborigines had used the sandstone to sharpen spearheads etc. As I was walking along, I glanced up to a rock crevice and saw a large paperbark container. On investigation, it was an Aboriginal body...Mate! I got out of there and hopped it quick-smart to the police station, told them my story. An officer came back with me...I was quite apprehensive as we came to the crevice. And there it was, GORNE...There was still some minor evidence, bits of paperbark.

 

From memory, it was about 35-45 minutes later when the police officer and I looked at the crevice.

 

I can only assume I had been watched earlier. I still wonder how, why and who...And it still gives me "the willies"

 

True story.

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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Pablo's thread on chinese food reminded me of the early Chinese folk in the Goldfields.

 

http://www.kidcyber.com.au/topics/goldchinese.htm

 

Seems that the amounts of gold coming out of the ground never matched up with the official tally. A number of Chinese people who died on the diggings had their bones filled with gold and the 'bodies' were returned to China.

 

http://www.gemsociety.org/info/igem23.htm

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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Good thread, this made interesting reading though.

 

 

Falling student interest in Australian history at Melbourne University has prompted a review to recommend it scrap its Australian Studies programme for undergraduates.

 

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/higher-education/future-of-australian-studies-in-doubt/story-e6frgcjx-1226120347299


Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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Thanks for posting those pics of Ballarat Kate, my brother lived up around the goldfields in Victoria for several years, as he and his friends were hobby gold prospectors, and they found so much gold up there - "there's gold in them thar hills !":laugh:A friend of his got enough gold 12 years ago to put a deposit on a small house up there (near Maryborough). My brother had put some of his gold findings into a small container and put it in a place of safekeeping - but it wasn't so safe as it turns out, as when he died and gave me the job of sorting out his belongings, I threw out an old plastic canister at the bottom of a box - turns out that was his safekeeping place - we estimated I threw out about $5 to 8,000 worth of gold. If there's life after death, my brother is not laughing right now:cry: The Victorian goldfields have lots of history, and the towns are well worth a look - especially places like Castlemaine etc.


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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Olly recommended a John Laws book "There is always more to the story" - I am half way through it and have learnt a great deal about many of the famous Aussie people whose names I have heard but not really known about. It is also helping me piece together Australian history - well the last couple of hundred years...

 

Glad you are enjoying it fleabo, I am quarter of the way through the sequel. How about the fact that the founder of Melbourne's son drowned in the Yarra?


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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Good thread, this made interesting reading though.

 

 

Falling student interest in Australian history at Melbourne University has prompted a review to recommend it scrap its Australian Studies programme for undergraduates.

 

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/higher-education/future-of-australian-studies-in-doubt/story-e6frgcjx-1226120347299

 

I guess that's because some people just what to live in the present and aren't interested in things which have come before - it's like history is the past so why go there? As they say those who disregard history may be doomed to make the same mistakes. We know the world goes in cycles, and some people don't realise that some of the things they have today are not new at all, they are just a more recent version of things that have been before. I have even surprised my kids with some of these revelations !:idea:


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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Glad you are enjoying it fleabo, I am quarter of the way through the sequel. How about the fact that the founder of Melbourne's son drowned in the Yarra?

 

Did he mention the fact that Melbourne was founded from Tasmania?:biggrin:

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